Viper Perimeter Protection from Honeywell Security
Viper Perimeter Protection from Honeywell Security

When it comes to Perimeter Protection, Viper is the brand that has become the generic term, accepted by all as the market leader - with over 2,000,000 units having being fitted worldwide.  The latest offerings are based on extremely successful predecessors and have a number of user requested upgrade features incorporated.  These include removable electronics and dual stage sensitivity settings, enabling a much more accurate set up even in the most testing circumstances.The Viper range of perimeter products are the most extensive that you will find from any one manufacturer and are tailored to the need of the installer / end user.  The range includes a Calibration Tool that allows for regular and repeated accurate sensitivity set up, the V Box, a purpose designed heavy duty enclosure for wall mounted Viper detectors in high security areas and a cleverly designed shock sensor with integral door contact facility.Immediate indication of attack at point of attempted entryThe intruder will be detected as soon as they attempt entry - you will be able to pinpoint the exact location of attack.  This is indicated by a flashing LED on the activated detector.Detection before entry is gainedThe potential intruder can be alerted to their detection prior to gaining entry.  This may cause the intruder to flee and so preventing the opportunity for a crime to take place.Minimal damageDue to early detection and alert, the damage caused should be limited in scope and cost.24-hour protectionThe alarm system can be left permanently SET, protecting the perimeter at all times.Occupants and petsThroughout the night your freedom of movement and that of your animals will not be hampered, as might be the case with purely internal PIR detection. Features include:First to alarm option (Viper GLX only) Integral door contact (Viper GLX with contacts only) Non gravity dependent Walk test facility Remote reset White or brown option 10-year guarantee Patented "commando boot" base

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Intruder detectors - Expert commentary

Why customers should buy products and services from SMBs
Why customers should buy products and services from SMBs

In 1973, a brilliant economist named E.F. Schumacher wrote a seminal book titled ‘Small Is Beautiful:’ taking an opposing stance to the emergence of globalisation and “bigger is better” industrialism. He described the advantages of smaller companies and smaller scales of production, highlighting the benefits of building our economies around the needs of communities, not corporations. In almost every industry or market that exists in the world today, you're likely to find a difference in size between companies. Whether it’s a global retail chain versus a small family-owned store, a corporate restaurant chain versus a mom-and-pop diner or a small bed and breakfast versus a large hotel chain — each side of the coin presents unique characteristics and advantages in a number of areas. Disparity in physical security industry Customers are drawn to products and services from large enterprises as the big names typically imply stability This disparity very clearly exists in the physical security industry, and differences in the sizes of product manufacturers and service providers could have important implications for the quality and type of the products and services offered. All too often, customers are drawn to products and services from large enterprises, as the big names typically imply stability, extensive product offerings and global reach. And that's not to say that these considerations are unwarranted; one could argue that larger companies have more resources for product development and likely possess the combined expertise and experience to provide a wide range of products and services. But the value that a company’s products and services can bring isn’t necessarily directly related to or dependent on its size. In an age where the common wisdom is to scale up to be more efficient and profitable, it’s interesting to pause and think about some of the possible advantages of small- and medium-sized businesses (SMBs). Typically, “small” companies are defined as those with less than 100 employees and “medium” with less than 500. Providing social mobility  Schumacher argued that smaller companies are important engines of economic growth. Indeed, according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), a group of 36 member countries that promotes policies for economic and social well-being, SMBs account for 60 to 70 percent of jobs in most OECD countries. Importantly, SMBs provide resilience in that there are often large economic and social impacts when big companies fail. Smaller companies are better for regional economies in general, as earnings stay more local compared to big businesses, which in turn generates additional economic activity. SMBs are also better at providing social mobility for disadvantaged groups by giving them opportunities and enabling them to realise their potential. Smaller companies are often more innovative, bringing to the market novel technologies and solutions such as Cloud, analytics, AI, and IoT New companies introduce new technologies There's no denying the role of start-ups when it comes to innovation. In the security industry, many new technologies (e.g. Cloud, analytics, AI, IoT) are first brought to the market by newer companies. In general, smaller companies’ products and services often have to be as good or better than others to be competitive in the marketplace. They are therefore often more innovative, bringing to the market novel technologies and solutions. And these companies are also more willing to try out other new B2B solutions, while larger companies tend to be more risk-averse. Customer service Aside from the quality of products and services, arguably one of the most important components of a security company’s success is its ability to interact with and provide customers the support that they deserve. Smaller companies are able to excel and stand out to their customers in a number of ways: Customer service. Customers’ perceptions of a product’s quality are influenced by the quality of support, and smaller manufacturers often possess a strong, motivated customer service team that can be relatively more responsive to customers of all sizes, not just the large ones. A superior level of support generally translates into high marks on customer satisfaction, since customers’ issues with products can be resolved promptly. Flexibility. SMBs have a greater capacity to detect and satisfy small market niches. While large companies generally create products and services for large markets, smaller companies deal more directly with their customers, enabling them to meet their needs and offer customised products and services. And this translates to adaptability, as SMBs become responsive to new market trends. By having a pulse on the market, smaller companies have much more flexibility in their supply chain and can adjust much faster in response to changing demand. Decision-making. Smaller companies are much more agile in decision-making, while larger enterprises often suffer from complex, tedious and lengthy decision-making processes. Communication is easier throughout SMBs, as smaller teams enable new ideas to flow and can solve problems faster. Job satisfaction Employees working for SMBs connect more directly with the company's goals and objectives, which in turn increases motivation and job satisfaction Employees working for SMBs connect more directly with the company's goals and objectives, which in turn increases motivation and job satisfaction. SMBs are also generally more connected to local communities and participation in community activities leads to a greater sense of purpose. Additionally, SMBs have a much smaller impact on the environment, which is increasingly becoming an important consideration for today’s employees and customers. Though Schumacher's book takes a much deeper dive into the large global effects of scale on people and profitability, the general impact of a company’s size on its products and services is clear. It’s important for all players in the security industry to remember that the commitment and dedication to product quality can be found in businesses of all sizes. Ensuring safety of people, property and assets Large manufacturers may catch your eye, but small business shouldn’t be forgotten, as they can offer end users a robust set of attributes and benefits. While all security companies are aiming to achieve a common goal of providing safety for people, property and assets, smaller businesses can provide extensive value when it comes to driving the economy, innovating in the industry, providing quality employment and offering superior customer service.

Steps to develop an integrated retail security strategy
Steps to develop an integrated retail security strategy

There are many aspects to consider when developing a retail security strategy, including loss prevention, physical security, asset protection, risk management, and IT. All these areas could be the responsibility of just a few people working to secure a handful of stores or each of these areas could be entirely separate departments, as is often the case for major retailers with locations throughout the country. Regardless of the size of the retailer, there are many different technologies that can be used within a retail store to improve security and loss prevention, yet none should be used in a silo. There are tremendous benefits to integrating security technologies and communications systems together, including enhancing overall safety and security, reducing shrink, and improving operations. There are many different technologies that can be used within a retail store to improve security and loss prevention As the existing security infrastructure is evaluated and plans for the future are developed, the team responsible should consider some of the following questions. Are there areas of the store that require greater security? Are there notifications or other technologies that could improve the efficiency of personnel and the safety of shoppers? Are there other departments within the organisation that could benefit from the data gathered by the security technology? Understanding current pain points within the stores and how integrated security solutions can address these is the key to implementing the best solution. Here are a few “hot spots” within a typical retail store that easily demonstrate the power of integrated solutions. Point of sale terminals Whether it’s loss through sweet hearting or other fraud, point of sale terminals present a significant shrink risk for retailers. Integrated systems enhance security at these locations. Video recording of HD or megapixel cameras integrated with point of sale data makes it easy to locate video associated with transactions and exception reporting. This allows for visual verification of each transaction when needed.There are tremendous benefits to integrating security technologies and communications systems together Other risks like robbery not only result in loss, but also impact the safety of employees and shoppers alike. Panic buttons or bill trap sensors connected to the intrusion detection system ensure silent alarms are issued when employees are at risk. When the intrusion detection system is integrated with the video system, pressing a panic button or pulling the bill from the sensor can automatically trigger a video snapshot to be sent to the monitoring station to provide verification of the alarm and more information for law enforcement when they are dispatched. Adding audio integration to the intrusion system can also result in a message sent to the store security personnel’s two-way radio when a panic button is pushed, or a bill trap sensor is activated. If no security guard is onsite, video monitoring services can allow the monitoring centre to intervene through audio, alerting the perpetrator that his or her actions are being monitored and that the authorities have been contacted. This may cause the offender to flee the area, helping to mitigate the safety risk as well as the potential for loss. Panic buttons or bill trap sensors connected to the intrusion detection system ensure silent alarms are issued when employees are at risk High value displays Protect high-value or frequently-stolen items such as electronics, using video analytics integrated with audio communication Protect high-value or frequently-stolen items such as electronics, using video analytics integrated with audio communications. For example, a person standing at a display for longer than a pre-defined time or touching items on display can trigger a video snapshot to be sent to the store manager and an audio message to play through a nearby loudspeaker, such as: “Thank you for your interest in our smartphone selection; an associate will be there soon to assist you.” This not only alerts potential offenders that their actions are being watched, it also serves to improve customer service for legitimate shoppers – as a retail floor associate is notified that a customer may need assistance. Cash office An access control reader at the door to the cash office restricts access to only authorised individuals. Integrating video can automatically capture an image of the person requesting access for verifying an employee’s identification prior to granting access or for retrospective analysis in the event of a theft. Exit doors If an employee props open a back door – either for easy re-entry after a break or to allow access to another person with intentions of theft – integration of the intrusion detection system to the video and audio system can significantly reduce risk of loss. For example, the intrusion detection system can monitor doors for abnormal conditions, even when the system is disarmed.Loss can also occur when a cooler or freezer malfunctions or when the door is accidentally left open A door left open for longer than a pre-defined time can cause an alarm on the intrusion panel, which can trigger a nearby camera to send a snapshot of the open door to the store manager and trigger the public address system to play a pre-recorded message through a nearby speaker. This prompts the employee to close the door, reducing risk of theft. Coolers and freezers Loss isn’t just about theft. Loss can also occur when a cooler or freezer malfunctions or when the door of one of these units is accidentally left open. The same concept for monitoring exit doors can also apply to doors for coolers and freezers to prevent spoilage. A cooler or freezer door monitored by the intrusion detection system can trigger an alert or chime to play in the area to remind an employee to close the door or to alert the store manager to the issue. While providing surveillance of the cash register area, the camera's video analytics can be used to trigger an alert in case the queue exceeds the pre-defined threshold Serving a dual purpose Retailers can use the metadata from the cameras to gather business statistics like counts of people entering the store While the technology solutions described above positively impact loss prevention in a retail store, they can also extend beyond security to improve health and safety and enhance customer service as well as customer engagement and sales. For example, while securing a store’s main entrance with IP cameras featuring on-board video analytics, retailers can use the metadata from the cameras to gather business statistics like counts of people entering the store. This data can help them understand peak days and times when making decisions about staffing. Or while providing surveillance of the cash register area, the camera's video analytics can also be used to trigger an alert in case the number of people in a queue exceeds the pre-defined threshold. At this point, the same public address system and loudspeakers used to play background music to enhance the shopping experience could be activated to broadcast a message to request another cash register to be opened, improving store operations. For security and loss prevention purposes, video analytics can also be used to ensure that no one enters or leaves the retail shop using the emergency exit. To address health and safety issues, these same cameras can also trigger an alarm if that emergency exit is blocked by an object – improving the safety of customers and employees. When systems are used to deliver data for purposes beyond security, other departments may be willing to contribute toward the cost Metadata generated by the cameras can also be used to gather information that when processed with sophisticated algorithms in the cloud can show trajectories of the paths that shoppers take as they travel throughout a store as well as heat maps indicating where they walk, stop and dwell – all while protecting the privacy of individual shoppers. This information can be used by merchandisers to evaluate the success of displays and store layouts, which directly impacts customer engagement and sales. When systems are used for and deliver data for purposes beyond security, other departments may be willing to contribute toward the cost of the system. This provides an added benefit by relieving some of the cost burden from security or other operational budgets. Product selection Integration is becoming easier using standards and expanding industry partnerships. However, in some cases, choosing systems from a single vendor that are designed to work together can help to speed and simplify installation, while also reducing system costs for both the integrator and the user. Regardless of the products chosen, it will be important for a retailer with many locations to have consistency in the type of equipment installed at each site. This makes support easier and enables a more uniform response to incidents that happen at various stores. As many retailers already understand, there is no silver bullet to reducing loss. However, a combination of the right technologies working together to prevent shrink and improve investigative capabilities can result in smarter and more effective loss prevention.

Five cyber security threats your enterprise must address
Five cyber security threats your enterprise must address

By now your organisation should know the drill. To keep your enterprise safe from unauthorised access you take the basic precautions: create strong passwords that are not re-used and are updated frequently, use updated anti-virus software, employ host and network-based intrusion detection and prevention, data encryption, etc. etc. However, complacency has no place in cybersecurity. Hackers are working round-the-clock to outwit your most ardent security professionals. Here are a few specific vulnerabilities that require immediate and constant attention to stay safe in a hostile security world. Protect against burst attacks You may be aware of DDoS, or distributed denial of service attacks. In fact, Cisco writes that these online attacks — where high-volume traffic floods a system’s servers, making web traffic extremely slow — grew 172% in 2016. But in the last few years, Cisco documents how "burst attacks", a type of DDoS attack that floods traffic in short bursts at random times over a prolonged period, has skyrocketed. They claim that in one study, 42% of the companies faced a burst attack in 2017. Burst attacks change vectors throughout an attack, making it difficult to create a signature to block the attack According to Radware, on-premises DDoS protection needs to adapt to counter these often less than one-minute attacks. While the majority of these solutions detect burst attacks, they write that "most of them limit the rate of bad (and legitimate) traffic to a certain threshold, resulting in a high level of false positives." One big challenge is burst attacks change vectors throughout an attack, making it difficult to create a signature to block the attack. They recommend adopting two key solutions: 1) a behavioural DDoS protection system that utilises machine learning algorithms to identify the patterns of burst attacks, and 2) measuring the degree-of-attack (DoA) surface, which looks at the bandwidth or rate of a specific type of traffic and the percentage of a given type of traffic out of the entire distribution of traffic. If an attack rates high in both the bandwidth and percentage parameters, then it gets a high DoA surface score, showing that a burst attack likely occurred. Prioritise network infrastructure Nefarious actors have been exploiting both enterprise level and small/home office and residential routers For companies with in-house information technology staff, network infrastructure usually gets plenty of attention. Proper configuration, maintenance and security are often key considerations for infrastructure due to its importance to the business. What about smaller entities? Do you have a small switch or router you either purchased or leased from your internet service provider? If so, when was the last time you updated it? In Alert TA18-106A, the United States Computer Emergency Response Team (US-CERT) shares information dating all the way back to 2015 on how nefarious actors have been exploiting both enterprise level and small office/home office and residential routers and switches. If you haven’t changed passwords and updated the software/firmware on these devices yet it should be near the top of your priority list. Hide sensitive web pages from search engines Search engines are an easy first step for someone looking to exploit your environment. They can conduct searches of your known web presence, looking for pages which might not have been meant for the general public but are still accessible. Using robots.txt pages can be excluded from search engine crawlers. Entrepreneur.com suggests checking out a tutorial from SEObook.com to learn more about how you can do this. Keep in mind this will only deter the most basic attackers as more sophisticated attackers will conduct manual searches. Update passwords on your IoT devices Data at rest is important, but data in transit is just as important to encrypt, particularly sensitive information It is shocking how many IoT devices are used in our daily lives, such as security and video conference cameras, cars, and smart sensors, but also contraptions you probably forgot are now connected to the internet, such as garage doors, appliances, etc. Tom’s Guide gives a good list of the many things you should remember to update. Use encryption to protect data in transit Encryption your data at rest – when it is stored somewhere – is incredibly important. However, your encryption efforts should not stop there. Data in transit is just as important to encrypt, particularly sensitive information. This could include communication between your websites and applications or even just communications within your company. Unencrypted information is at risk to an eavesdropper on your network. To prevent the data from being usable to potential eavesdroppers, ensure you are using encrypted connections such as HTTPS, SSL, TLS, FTPS, etc.