New recording management software from Hanwha Techwin America
New recording management software from Hanwha Techwin America

Samsung has launched new recording management software to facilitate the easy set up, monitoring and recording of images captured by the company's iPOLiS network camera and dome ranges. A four-channel version of Samsung's NET-i Ware recording software is available license-free with various upgrade versions on offer to allow a user to control up to 64 recording channels. The primary objective of the NET-i Ware recording software is to provide a full control, administration and set-up of cameras and domes from the company's iPOLiS range of network products, including the latest HD megapixel series, and allow images to be recorded and played back via a PC across the network. With this in mind, Samsung's design engineers have packed the NET-i Ware software with features to ensure operators are able to take full advantage of the latest IP technology. Various compression methods are therefore supported, including H.264, MPEG-4 & MJPEG. Multiple back-up video formats are also supported as are a number of audio formats, e.g. G.726, G.711, G.723 and PCM. The device registration process of the NET-i Ware software allows an operator to almost effortlessly register, modify or delete up to 64 Network devices and configure each one individually for scheduled or pre and post event recording. Other key features of the NET-i Ware software include: The NET-i Ware SNS-SF software will automatically backup/archive at a pre-determined time either every day or every week on a per camera basis to a file location of choice. The recorded data has a global auto deletion mode as well as an option to automatically overwrite the oldest video when the HDDs are full. The automatic sending of an email informing the recipient of the camera name, event type, event time and a snapshot JPEG image of what has triggered an alarm or a camera's motion detection function. An administrator can also decide if they wish to record both video and audio and if certain cameras should be hidden from an operators view. The NET-i Ware SNS-SF software empowers administrators to set-up User Groups, with each group given different levels of control, e.g. Set-up, PTZ controls covert monitoring, search facilities and back-up.

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Count, measure, analyse: New video analysis tools for retail stores and beyond
Count, measure, analyse: New video analysis tools for retail stores and beyond

The MOBOTIX Q24M-Sec hemispheric camera, which can capture an entire room with no blind spots, has now even more to offer with the new integrated MxAnalytics video analysis tool. MxAnalytics is an efficient tool for process optimization or marketing purposes and can be used in small retail stores as well as in public buildings such as museums or airports in order to receive important information. Heat Map: Track and evaluate movements Which shelves in the shop are attracting the most customers? Which products at the exhibition booth hold the attention of the visitors most? Which waiting areas in the departure hall are preferred on Mondays between 8 a.m. and 12 p.m.? MxAnalytics makes it possible to reliably capture and evaluate the movement of people or objects in the live image. The most frequented areas are highlighted in color on a heat map in a predefined area. The areas with the most movement are displayed in red, and those with little movement in blue. Counting Lines: Count people and objects Using counting lines to count people and objects and generate observation data is a valuable tool. How many people pass by a specific entrance in an hour or a day? And what direction were they coming from? MxAnalytics also stands out when it comes to user-friendliness thanks to quick, user-friendly configuration, when creating reports, for example. Another highlight: The results of the video motion analysis can be saved as daily, weekly or monthly reports in a table and exported via various interfaces. Whether via web interface, e-mail or as a MxControlCenter prompt, the reports are automatically collected in the camera and can be easily accessed or sent at any time. This can take place fully automatically and individually for any number of addressees. Reduce costs with MxAnalytics In addition to the count feature, the analysis of statistical behavior data makes an essential contribution to process optimization, thus further reducing costs. MOBOTIX cameras like the Q24M differ from most traditional video systems thanks to their decentralized system architecture. Each camera includes a high-speed computer with long-term memory. It is no longer necessary to use a computer or server to record or analyze image material. Video analysis takes place decentralized in the camera, without network load. This reduces total costs and maintains the system's high performance. MxAnalytics is available free of charge with the latest en firmware version 4.1.4.11 and from the MOBOTIX website with no usage restrictions. It can also be easily integrated into all older Q24M-Sec models via software update. The new release (2.5.2) of the free MxControlCenter video management software supports MxAnalytics, too. This allows evaluating the results from different cameras in a more convenient manner. The update enables the configuration of MxAnalytics on a Q24M camera and subsequent analysis of the created and stored data. MxControlCenter 2.5.2 can now be downloaded free of charge from the MOBOTIX website. MOBOTIX is continuing to develop MxAnalytics for image data processing inside the camera for the Q24 initially. The robust MOBOTIX camera needs very little maintenance and can be discreetly integrated into any environment thanks to its elegant design and compact size. The next step will be the integration into further MOBOTIX camera models.

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New Management Experience with VIVOTEK VAST 2
New Management Experience with VIVOTEK VAST 2

VIVOTEK’s VAST 2 is an easy to use IP video management software (VMS). To meet the real-world needs of users, it comes with exciting advancements such as easy operation on single or multiple monitors, custom layout to accommodate both corridor and panorama orientations, rapid export of multi-channel video and the acquisition of VCA analytics & cybersecurity attack events from VIVOTEK cameras and substations (such as NVRs) in a hierarchical system structure. In the new version update of VIVOTEK’s video management software VAST 2, several advanced user-centered functionalities will be unveiled. The new features include the Deep-Learning Technology Smart Search II, Cybersecurity Management Solution, and License Plate Recognition Integration. With this update, users can enjoy the intuitive interface of VAST 2 while achieving a higher level of management efficiency. Three new user-oriented benefits will be highlighted in VAST 2: Smart Search II Building on Deep-Learning Video Content Analytics, the Smart Search II of VAST 2 allows users to quickly search for specific objects and people in the specified region. While enabling People Detection feature, only people-based activities will serve as event triggers. The security operator no longer needs to search through extensive footage for critical videos, thus improving both efficiency and effectiveness. Cybersecurity Management Solution Offering the complete end-to-end cybersecurity protection, the new VAST 2 is fully integrated with VIVOTEK cameras and NVRs and becomes a powerful cybersecurity central management site. The protection includes Instant Alert Notifications, allowing users to receive notifications  automatically, and the Cyber Risk Dashboard to visually identify common types of cyber-attacks. In addition, users can filter attack logs according to a range of criteria, making it quicker to find abnormal events and take necessary actions to minimize risks. License Plate Recognition Integration Now, the new VAST 2 is fully integrated with VIVOTEK’s LPR/ Automatic Number-Plate Recognition (ANPR) camera, IB9387-LPR. Users can see the live images with selected information, such as confidence level or black list status, which can in turn become a trigger source in Alarm Management, making it easy to intelligently manage license plate data.

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Avigilon links high definition video with point of Sale transaction data
Avigilon links high definition video with point of Sale transaction data

Launched at ASIS 2009 in Anaheim, CA, the Avigilon Control Center HD Point-of-Sale (POS) Transaction Engine is a new add-on feature to the award winning Avigilon Control Center Network Video Management Software (NVMS). Avigilon Control Center HD POS Transaction Engine links live and visually lossless recorded high definition video with transaction data, enabling security professionals to search and quickly find specific transactions and associated indisputable video evidence for event validation.Meeting the increasing demands for better video quality, Avigilon Control Center HD POS Transaction Engine helps customers reduce shrinkage and theft, and address compliance requirements, by enabling security professionals to more quickly and successfully find video surveillance footage associated with a specific transaction. The transaction engine provides customers the ability to link vital business intelligence with HD video, helping to analyse operations and improve bottom line performance."With the current economy, all departments within an organisation are focusing on performance," said Dave Tynan, vice-president of global sales and marketing at Avigilon. "The new Avigilon Control Center HD POS Transaction Engine is a highly effective tool for associating any character based transaction data-such as point of sale data and bar code data-with HD video to provide indisputable and instantaneous evidence to deal with liabilities, shrinkage, service level improvement, and process efficiencies."Avigilon Control Center HD POS Transaction Engine includes the following features and benefits:Multiple streams of transactions from devices such as cash registers, automated teller machines (ATM), or bar code scanners can be associated to a single HD camera to cover a larger field of viewTransactions are linked to associated video to allow instant review, including accessing individual transactions using a powerful search functionTransaction information is simultaneously displayed alongside live or recorded videoException filtering and reporting allows the triggering of events when transactions match certain criteria. These events can be mapped to on-screen alerts, e-mail alerts, and other system events.

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Avigilon Control Center high definition surveillance software offers improved performance and manageability
Avigilon Control Center high definition surveillance software offers improved performance and manageability

Avigilon, the performance and value leader in high definition (HD) and megapixel video surveillance systems, announced the release of Avigilon Control Center 4.2, the company's latest release of its award-winning HD surveillance software with High Definition Stream ManagementTM (HDSM). With new features to improve performance and manageability, Avigilon Control Center 4.2 captures, transmits, manages, stores, archives, plays back, and exports HD video while efficiently handling bandwidth and storage requirements. "Organisations around the world are using Avigilon HD surveillance systems to monitor operations, validate safety procedures, and ensure compliance with industry regulations or corporate best practices," said Dave Tynan, vice president of global sales and marketing at Avigilon. "With added features for improved manageability and a more powerful network video management software platform that supports data from any resolution or camera technology, Avigilon Control Center 4.2 delivers superior evidence to lead to improved response times and greater investigative success." Avigilon Control Center 4.2 includes the following new features and benefits: Web Browser Based Avigilon Control Center ClientAvigilon Control Center 4.2 now includes full-featured client software that can be used inside Microsoft Internet Explorer without requiring the installation of software on the remote viewing machine. Using HDSM, the new web browser based client enables quick and reliable access to HD surveillance images from remote machines which allows security professionals real-time access to surveillance images from any location. Site Grouping for Dynamic System Explorer Layout Avigilon Control Center 4.2 facilitates the customised grouping of servers, cameras, views, maps, and web pages within the system explorer. Benefitting large sites, custom grouping allows easier navigation and system management by grouping surveillance components logically instead of physically. With this feature, surveillance professionals can group components by site, location, owner, role, or whatever grouping makes most sense for their particular installation. Audio Alerts for Rules Engine Events and Alarm Monitoring Security operators need to know when an important event happens. Avigilon Control Center 4.2 features pre-loaded or customised advanced audio alerts to ensure that security professionals are alerted to important events. Manually Triggered Recording Manually triggered recording capabilities allow operators to manually start recording for a specific camera using a newly designed button on the image viewing panel. This feature enables operators to instantly turn on recording if observing an event on a monitored system and works in conjunction with alarms, events, motion, and all other existing recording triggers. Expanded Third Party IP Camera Support Avigilon Control Center 4.2 records and manages video from a wider range of third party IP cameras and analogue encoders for the purpose of building hybrid systems and preserving existing assets. Management of surveillance video from third party cameras and analogue encoders is in the camera's native compression format, including H.264, MPEG4, or MJPEG.

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CCTV software - Expert commentary

Addressing the Internet Of Things (IoT) and challenges in device design using a comprehensive approach
Addressing the Internet Of Things (IoT) and challenges in device design using a comprehensive approach

As the number of connected devices increases worldwide, the ways that they are being used, designed, and tested have also expanded. The rise of connected devices is demanding engineers to harness the power of the internet of things, which is expected to hit 28 billion by 2025. A comprehensive approach to device design is needed more than ever to address the challenges that this rapid growth will bring. Why engineers should be using IoT technology in product design The demand for devices designed to use the Internet of Things (IoT) technology is increasing as more industries are finding expanded ways to put them into use. Industries such as healthcare, automobiles, and agriculture are becoming more dependent on cloud capabilities and are therefore in need of new devices able to connect to it. Due to this rise in demand, an increasing amount of devices are delivering a multitude of benefits both to consumers and companies. However, this new wave of products has led to a growing list of challenges for engineers as they are forced to address IoT tech in regards to connectivity, regulations, longevity, and security. Ways to use IoT in the development process Engineers are facing these new challenges along with the normal pressure of deadlines and test considerations. By approaching all of these issues from a comprehensive point-of-view, the solutions become clearer and new device capabilities can be born. Let’s look at the challenges individually as well as possible solutions for them. Improving connectivity IoT enables data to be transferred between infrastructure, the cloud, and devices, making the process smooth  Because IoT is based around connection, it’s no surprise that the primary challenge for engineers to overcome is the improvement of connectivity between devices. IoT enables data to be transferred between infrastructure, the cloud, and devices, so making this process as smooth as possible is crucial. The main challenges involved with connectivity have to do with development and product testing while meeting industry standards and best practices. Additionally, many companies lack the necessary equipment and technology to develop new IoT devices, which makes it difficult to create scalable prototypes and test new products. Suggested solutions To address the issue of not having the expertise and necessary tools for testing, we suggest outsourcing the prototyping and evaluation process instead of attempting to tackle this in-house. By doing this, you’re able to free up resources that would otherwise be needed for expensive equipment and qualified staff. Helping comply with regulations When working with devices that are connected across the world, there is a complex web of regulations and conformance standards that can lead to challenges for engineers. The necessity of complying with these regulations while also pushing to meet deadlines can be burdensome and lead to an increase in production time and expenses. Failure to comply with global and regional laws, as well as system and carrier requirements, can lead to fines and costly setbacks. This type of failure can destroy a company’s reputation on top of causing financial losses, often leading to the loss of business. Suggested solutions By testing the IoT device design and components early, engineers can address any pre-compliance issues that may arise. During the early stages of development, we suggest using scalable and automated test systems readily available in the marketplace. Improved communication with other devices New challenges arise as new devices hit the market and existing technologies are redesigned to offer a better experience In the rapidly growing number of connected devices, new challenges will arise as new devices hit the market and existing technologies are redesigned to offer a better user experience. This rapid growth in devices will lead to congested networks leading to the necessity of devices being able to function in the midst of increased traffic and interference. Failure to do this will lead to delayed responses which could prove to be fatal. Suggested solutions The best solution for this issue is found in the evaluation process and supporting test methods that the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) published in the American National Standard for Evaluation of Wireless Coexistence (ANSI). This process addresses the interconnectivity issues present in radio frequency environments. The outlined process involves defining the environment and evaluating the wireless performance of the equipment through thorough testing. An in-depth version can be found in its entirety online. Increasing the longevity of devices IoT devices are being used in vital industries such as healthcare and automotive so battery life and power consumption are two challenges that engineers must take seriously. A failure in this area could potentially lead to loss of life or safety concerns on the road. As new firmware and software are being designed to address these factors, engineers must be implementing them into IoT devices with the ability to be continually updated. Suggested solutions Longevity should be addressed in all aspects of the design process and tested thoroughly using a wide range of currents. By doing this, an engineer can simulate consumer applications to best predict performance. Security Security and privacy are concerns with any technology, but with the use of IoT in medical devices, it’s paramount Security has been a controversial issue for IoT since its inception. Security and privacy are concerns with any technology, but with the widespread use of IoT in medical devices, smart home appliances, and access control and surveillance, it’s paramount. For example, medical devices may store information about health parameters, medications, and prescriber information. In some cases, these devices may be controlled by an app, such as a smart pacemaker, to prevent heart arrhythmias. Naturally, a security issue in these devices could be devastating. Another example of dangerous security concern is with surveillance cameras and access control, such as for home or business security systems. These intelligent door locking systems contain locks, lock access controllers, and associated devices that communicate with each other. Suspicious activities are flagged with alerts and notifications, but if a hacker gains access, it can lead to real-world, physical danger. Security design points Here are some key points for security design: Physical security: IoT devices may be in external, isolated locations that are vulnerable to attack from not only hackers but by human contact. Embedding security protection on every IoT device is expensive, but it’s important for general security and data safety. Security of data exchange: Data protection is also important because data gets transmitted from IoT devices to the gateway, then onto the cloud. With surveillance and access control information or sensitive medical information, and encryption is vital to protecting data from a breach. Cloud storage security: Similar to data exchange, the information stored in medical devices, surveillance and access control systems, and some smart appliances with payment features, must be protected. This includes encryption and device authentication through access control, which can police what resources can be accessed and used. Update: Security vulnerabilities will always occur, so the key to addressing them is having a plan to address errors and release patches. Customers should also have options to secure devices quickly and effectively. Suggested solutions Engineers can include security and protection into IoT devices with early and perpetual testing throughout the design process. Most security breaches occur at endpoints or during updates, giving engineers a starting point for how to address them. Creating more secure devices Ensuring the security of connected devices should be of supreme importance for engineers as these devices are vulnerable to security breaches. The ultimate security of devices goes beyond the scope of engineering as the network and enterprise levels must also be secure to protect against potential threats. However, engineers play a role in this protection as well and should consider device security in the design process. Suggested solutions On a device level, engineers can help protect IoT devices from vulnerabilities by implementing early testing and continuing it throughout the design process. Most security transgressions occur at endpoints so this continual testing can, and should, create barriers to breaches. Regulations and compliance For IoT engineers, the complex web of regulations and compliance standards present new challenges Regulations and compliance surrounding data and technology are nothing new, but for IoT engineers, the complex web of regulations and compliance standards present new challenges. Engineers are already addressing obstacles in security and connectivity, all while meeting deadlines, and working around regulations adds time and expense to the process. Unfortunately, a failure to comply with global, regional, or local laws can lead to setbacks and fines. In addition to time lost in production and possible fines, the damage to a company’s reputation can lead to even more losses. Suggested solutions Compliance should be considered early and often in the design process. In the early stages of development, the IoT device or components can be tested to address and compliance issues. If possible, use a scalable and automated test system. The comprehensive solution As we stare at an uncertain future full of possibilities, it’s clear to see that new challenges will continue to be presented as technology evolves and new innovative devices are designed by engineers. By addressing these issues early and often, solutions can be implemented and problems prevented before they even have a chance to occur thanks to sound engineering and solid design.

Back to school: Best practices for a holistic approach to security
Back to school: Best practices for a holistic approach to security

In the past decade, we’ve seen an unfortunate increase in gun-related incidents on school campuses, making security and policy efforts a top priority for educational facilities nationwide. While the causes for this increase are hotly debated in and around the education community, the facts remain that specific steps can be taken to mitigate risks. To tackle this issue, officials from campus stakeholders, law enforcement officials, architects, and security personnel, have met to find solutions for protecting educational facilities. Further complicating matters, educational campuses are again tasked with mitigating health risks associated with COVID-19, as we head into the third pandemic school year. Video communication tools To safely reopen, new technologies and policies in many K-12 and higher education institutions have been released, with many searching for a way to leverage existing security infrastructure. Achieving both health safety and physical security requires an integrated approach—from all-around best practices, to video communication tools and enhanced security infrastructure. The simple intercom has been a security staple in the education market for many years A holistic approach is best to ensure the safety of students, staff, and visitors. The simple intercom has been a security staple in the education market for many years, but now in a pandemic-centric world, these devices provide a new set of required capabilities. Intercoms, once thought to be a basic security tool, can now be combined with video, offering users the ability to solve multiple pain points associated with COVID-19. Controlled access points In this article, we’ll discuss some best practices for educational decision-makers, as well as how video intercoms can enhance overall security architecture. A school’s first opportunity to mitigate threats lies in its ability to deter threats entering in the first place. This begins with ensuring policies, procedures, and equipment are all up to standard. Most campus shootings and other violent acts occur once the individual has made it through the front door of a building; putting the emphasis on controlled access points at key entries to add an extra barrier of safety between threats and students. While written policies help staff understand how visitors are approved for entry, they should also be informed of more simple items, such as why doors can’t be left propped open, when to lockdown, or how to evacuate during an emergency. Physical security solutions The security industry has also created effective physical security solutions for protecting a campus Another best practice would be training staff to spot signs of distressed and potentially violent students, while providing ways to get help for them. When it comes to campus security, there is no one-size-fits-all approach, which is why security integrators should also be included in planning processes to tailor a custom solution for each campus to address its unique security needs. While best practices, including mental health screenings, stricter discipline codes, and faster law enforcement responses are all crucial to campus safety, the security industry has also created effective physical security solutions for protecting a campus—which includes enhanced two-way video and audio/visual communication solutions such as a video intercom. For years educational facilities have utilised intercoms to manage access, but now, it’s more important than ever to ensure the safety of students and staff by thoroughly vetting all those who enter a building. Providing visual verification Long gone are the days of asking visitors to check in manually using a sign-in book, or simply walking into a school. Best practices now require the presence of a visitor management system (VMS), which is a more accurate and seamless way to manage access. Using a VMS, a campus could add its own custom watch list, which when properly implemented, can provide protection from abuse orders, custodial issues, and offer names and pictures of disgruntled former employees and students. Using a VMS, a campus could add its own custom watch list, which when properly implemented As security technology has become more sophisticated, so have intercom capabilities—extending far beyond what they used to be. Going further than a simple button and speaker system, when used in conjunction with an IP video system, intercoms provide visual verification that the person requesting access into a school building does indeed belong there. Contact tracing solutions Whether it’s a student, parent, or staff member, verifying a person’s identity and ensuring that the individual has proper credentials is key. Pairing an intercom with a camera allows for this important, real-time visual and audio communication between the front office and those requesting access. Additionally, intercoms can be used as contact tracing solutions by leveraging an audit trail in case of an outbreak. For example, if a number of students at a college or university all use a mobile app to gain access to a dormitory through an intercom system, in the event that someone tests positive for COVID-19, they are able to contact all students, staff, or visitors who frequent that building. IP video intercoms can assist in pandemic related and security use cases by limiting unnecessary human-to-human interaction and replacing that with remote management capabilities. Remote monitoring station Remote monitoring allows for eyes on a facility while personnel are not physically present There is increased flexibility when working from a mobile app, or remote monitoring station, especially for security directors or officers on educational campuses. For example, if a campus is not able to staff a lobby of a building or a dormitory, they can remotely manage access from a mobile device. This enables security personnel to access video feeds and directly communicate with students or staff requesting access into a building. Remote monitoring allows for eyes on a facility while personnel are not physically present, thus increasing overall security. It can also give the appearance of the building being occupied at all times, even when it’s not. Another way an educational facility can leverage their video intercom system is to shift to mobile applications that offer a touchless way to gain access. Mobile application credential A mobile application removes the need for a physical key card and eliminates the potential of loss or theft of that access credential. It also allows for easy updating to credential status. For example, if a student, staff member or visitor is added to an ‘access denied’ list, security personnel can simply revoke a mobile application credential, versus having to track down a physical key and run the risk of copies or other issues. The importance of visual confirmation cannot be stressed enough when it comes to educational campuses The importance of visual confirmation cannot be stressed enough when it comes to educational campuses. Not only for security purposes to visually confirm identity, or screen for suspicious behaviours or other anomalies, simply having the ability to have a conversation with someone requesting access is vital. Better audio feedback There’s been a shift in recent years, in some cases spurred by the pandemic, to focus on how existing technologies can meet the unique needs of students, staff and visitors. For example, intercoms allow for two-way video which is crucial for an individual who is deaf, or hearing impaired, who needs to communicate using sign language. Additionally, intercoms can be integrated with t-coil features, to allow for better audio feedback for those with hearing aids. The past few years have taught us that while best practices, attention to the mental wellbeing of students, enhanced security at main entry points, and exits are all important focuses, educational security needs to be holistic and comprehensive. From physical security risks, to potential pandemic-related outbreaks, to the regular day-to-day communication needs of all individuals, decision-makers recognise intercom systems easily address each unique need.

Data explosion: Futureproofing your video surveillance infrastructure
Data explosion: Futureproofing your video surveillance infrastructure

Video surveillance systems are producing more unstructured data than ever before. A dramatic decrease in camera costs in recent years has led many businesses to invest in comprehensive surveillance coverage, with more cameras generating more data. Plus, advances in technology mean that the newest (8K) cameras are generating approximately 800% more data than their predecessors (standard definition). Traditional entry-level solutions like network video recorders (NVRs) simply aren’t built to handle massive amounts of data in an efficient, resilient and cost-effective manner. This has left many security pioneers grappling with a data storage conundrum. Should they continue adding more NVR boxes? Or is there another, better, route? Retaining video data In short, yes. To future proof their video surveillance infrastructure, an increasing number of businesses are adopting an end-to-end surveillance architecture with well-integrated, purpose-built platforms for handling video data through its lifecycle. This presents significant advantages in terms of security, compliance and scalability, as well as unlocking new possibilities for data enrichment. All of this with a lower total cost of ownership than traditional solutions. Security teams would typically delete recorded surveillance footage after a few days or weeks Previously, security teams would typically delete recorded surveillance footage after a few days or weeks. However, thanks to increasingly stringent legal and compliance demands, many are now required to retain video data for months or even years. There’s no doubt that this can potentially benefit investigations and increase prosecutions, but it also puts significant pressure on businesses’ storage infrastructure. Data lifecycle management This necessitates a more intelligent approach to data lifecycle management. Rather than simply storing video data in a single location until it’s wiped, an end-to-end video surveillance solution can intelligently migrate data to different storage platforms and media as it ages. So, how does this work? Video is recorded and analysed on a combination of NVR, hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) and application servers. Then, it’s moved to resilient file storage for a pre-determined period, where it can be immediately retrieved and accessed for review. Finally, based on policies set by heads of security, data is moved from file storage to highly secure, low-cost archive storage such as an object, tape or cloud. Data is moved from file storage to highly secure, low-cost archive storage Long-term storage This process is known as tiering. It allows businesses to use reliable, inexpensive long-term storage for most of their data, whilst still enabling security pioneers to retrieve video data when the need arises, such as during a compliance audit, or to review footage following a security breach. In a nutshell, it offers them the best of both worlds. Scaling your video surveillance infrastructure can be a headache. Businesses that rely on NVRs – even high-end units with 64 or even 96 hard drives – are finding themselves running out of capacity increasingly quickly. In order to scale, security pioneers then have to procure new boxes. With NVRs, this inevitably involves a degree of guesswork. Should they go for the largest possible option, and risk over provisioning? Or perhaps a smaller option, and risk running out of capacity again? Common management console Security pioneers can easily add or remove storage capacity or compute resources – separately or together As businesses add new cameras or replace existing ones, many end up with inadequate surveillance infrastructure made up of multiple NVR boxes along with several application servers for running other surveillance functions such as access control, security photo databases, analytics, etc. This patchwork approach leaves security pioneers scrambling for capacity, maintaining various hardware footprints, repeating updates and checks across multiple systems, and taking up valuable time that could be better spent elsewhere. By contrast, flexible HCI surveillance platforms aggregate the storage and ecosystem applications to run on the same infrastructure and combine viewing under a common management console, avoiding ‘swivel chair’ management workflows. Plus, they offer seamless scalability. Security pioneers can easily add or remove storage capacity or compute resources – separately or together. Data storage solutions Over time, this ensures a lower total cost of ownership. First and foremost, it removes the risk of over provisioning and helps to control hardware sprawl. This in turn leads to hardware maintenance savings and lower power use. Many security pioneers are now looking beyond simple data storage solutions for their video surveillance footage. Meta tags can provide context around data, making it easier to find and access when needed Instead, they’re asking themselves how analysing this data can enable their teams to work faster, more efficiently and productively. Implementing an end-to-end video surveillance architecture enables users to take advantage of AI and machine learning applications which can tag and enrich video surveillance data. These have several key benefits. Firstly, meta tags can provide context around data, making it easier to find and access when needed. Object storage platform For instance, if security teams are notified of a suspicious red truck, they can quickly find data with this tag, rather than manually searching through hours of data, which can feel like looking for a needle in a haystack. Plus, meta tags can be used to mark data for future analysis. This means that as algorithms are run over time, policies can be set to automatically store data in the right location. For example, if a video is determined to contain cars driving in and out of your premises, it would be moved to long-term archiving such as an object storage platform for compliance purposes. If, on the other hand, it contained 24 hours of an empty parking lot, it could be wiped. These same meta tags may be used to eventually expire the compliance data in the archive after it is no longer needed based on policy. Video surveillance architecture Continuing to rely on traditional systems like NVRs will fast become unsustainable for businesses Even if your organisation isn’t using machine learning or artificial intelligence-powered applications to enhance your data today, it probably will be one, three, or even five years down the line. Implementing a flexible end-to-end video surveillance solution prepares you for this possibility. With new advances in technology, the quantity of data captured by video surveillance systems will continue rising throughout the coming decade. As such, continuing to rely on traditional systems like NVRs will fast become unsustainable for businesses. Looking forward, when moving to an end-to-end video surveillance architecture, security pioneers should make sure to evaluate options from different vendors. For true futureproofing, it’s a good idea to opt for a flexible, modular solution, which allow different elements to be upgraded to more advanced technologies when they become available.

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