Multiplexers - Expert commentary

Technology evolution leads to changes in security control room furniture
Technology evolution leads to changes in security control room furniture

Technology is changing the look and function of today’s security control rooms. Old-school CRT (cathode-ray tube) monitors are giving way to the thinner, flat screen monitors in the control room environment, but the transition is gradual. Randy Smith of Winsted still sees many control rooms that need to make the conversion, which is a boon to his company’s business. Furniture today is designed differently to accommodate the thinner monitors, often with larger screens. Need for integrated rack systems With the increase of IP-based systems comes the need for integrated rack systems that include advanced functionality such as cable management, adds Jim Coleman, National Sales Manager, AFC Industries. Server rooms are environmentally controlled by cooling systems and power systems monitored on the IP network. Low-profile flat screens allow centres to utilise space vertically, thus creating a smaller footprint for the consoles. Additionally, with IP-based systems, workstations will have a smaller footprint because there is less cumbersome equipment. In most cases the servers are stored in a secured, climate controlled environment to eliminate overheating of the servers and maintain their security, says Coleman. This environment also helps with cable and power management. AFC builds technical furniture racks that adhere to the precise needs of computer network server room operators. The company designs and fabricates LAN workbenches with versatile functionalities, and server room workstation racks that are scalable. There is a complete line of IT workbenches, IT computer racks and computer server rack mounts with flexible mounting options. In most cases the servers are stored in a secured, climate controlled environment to eliminate overheating of the servers and maintain their security Flexible control room designs Matko Papic, Chief Technology Officer of Evans Consoles, says the transition from bulky CRT equipment to flat-screen (lower profile) monitors was a major disruption in control room design; it changed the whole dynamic. Another evolution is the use of IP video streaming, which allows more flexibility in manipulation of audio-video content, and requires more flexible control room designs. Another shift, driven by larger, higher-definition monitors, is a shift to fewer monitors that display more information. Instead of a smaller monitor for each information stream, larger monitors now consolidate that information into “dashboard” displays. Looking ahead, control rooms will need to be more flexible, both in the initial design and the ability to adapt to changing technology, says Papic. Legacy customers who are currently using PCs may be moving to more remote applications. Sit-stand equipment will continue to be increasingly prevalent. “There will be more emphasis on flexibility, technology integration, and the ability to change over the life of the system,” says Papic. Consolidation of multiple operations into a single system A trend in security is consolidation of multiple physical operations into a single system, says Papic. As a result, more customers are taking more interest in alarm management and situational awareness. How is the technology being used in terms of alarm triggers? How can the systems react rapidly and provide information to a larger audience in the control room? These questions impact how control rooms are designed, and Evans Consoles can adapt lessons learned from other markets to these trends in the security arena. Greater use of technology is inevitable, says Coleman of AFC Industries. “It is virtually impossible for humans to monitor all security data at the street level in our cities,” he says. “As computers become more powerful and their programs more all-encompassing, we will see a greater shift to robotic and technology uses that will provide enhanced monitoring capabilities and safety Read our Control Rooms series here

Choosing the right power supplies for security installations
Choosing the right power supplies for security installations

 Selecting the optimum power supply for a system is critical to an installation  When it comes to selecting power supplies, knowledge is power. Determining the power requirements of every systems product, taking into account their integration with one another is critical to ensure that you are selecting and installing the power solutions most appropriate for your installation. Such information will enable you to select the power supplies that will be required to keep your security system running efficiently in the long run. Paul Rizzuto, Technical Sales Manager, Altronix Corp outlines some of the key factors to consider when choosing the right power solution for security installations - including those of video surveillance systems and access control systems - and fire alarm systems. Questions to consider when selecting the optimum power supply Before commencing the evaluation and selection process, three fundamental questions/issues need be addressed:Approvals and conformance to norms: Are there any specific agency approvals that the installation must conform to?Each state, county and even municipality has their own requirements regarding agency approvals. There are a variety of compliance issues such as UL listings for video, access control and fire/life safety that need to be adhered to along with specific local codes. It's imperative that you check with the local AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) to find out what agency listings you must conform to during the design process to assure your security system is in compliance before installing any components and power supplies. Features required: What are the application specific features required for the installation? Selecting power supplies for a security or fire alarm system is a complex process due to a number of variables Before starting the design process, a comprehensive analysis of the facility's security systems are required to determine feature sets of the power supplies. Up until recently, selecting power supplies often required the need to combine various components to deliver the functionality desired. For example, does the system need battery back-up in case of a power failure?  All that has changed with the introduction of a new breed of integrated power solutions that deliver both cost and installation advantages. Quantity, location and power requirements of the security system componentsWhat is the number of devices in the system, the power requirements for each, and their physical location?This information is necessary to determine the size and quantity of the power supplies, how many security devices they will run, and where they will be physically located.  It is always a good rule of thumb to add 20% more power to your calculations as a safety factor.  Alarm signal generation is a key consideration when dealing with power consumption in fire alarms systems Dealing with power consumption issues in fire alarm systems Power consumption is a primary issue when configuring fire alarm systems. One of the most critical considerations revolves around how alarm signals are activated. When an alarm condition exists, Notification Appliance Circuits (NAC) are output from the Fire Alarm Control Panel (FACP) to activate notification appliances such as strobes and horns commonly used to indicate an emergency situation. The number of notification appliances to be activated, along with the current draw for each device and its distance from the FACP, sometimes makes the deployment of NAC Power Extenders a necessary system component. For example, in large commercial installations or multi-tenant buildings, the total current draw of the notification appliances may well exceed the power output of the FACP. In these instances, one or more NAC Power Extenders need to be installed for those notification appliances where the wire runs are too long for the FACP to deliver sufficient power.  Features to consider when selecting a NAC Power Extender: Number of Class A or Class B indicating circuits.Total power rating (ex. 6.5 amp, 8 amp or 10 amp).Number of Aux. power outputs with or without battery backup.Programmable outputs: SynchronizationTemporal Code 3Input to output follower mode.Enclosure capacity: Room for battery backupAmple knockouts and room for wiringAgency approvals UL, MEA, CSFM and FM.NAC Power Extenders are available with programmable features that maintain horn/strobe synchronization by either producing internally generated sync protocols utilized by major signal manufacturers, or by electronically repeating these sync protocols from the FACP outputs. Power supply requirements for access control systems - key standards to follow    To ensure safety any device designated to lock or unlock an exit must be connected to the fire alarm systemAccess control systems manage entry and exit points at a facility by means of controlled locking devices. NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) requires that any device or system intended to actuate the locking or unlocking of exits, must be connected to the facility's fire alarm system so that all doors will release when an alarm signal is generated.To comply with NFPA requirements, there are two classifications of locking devices that need to be addressed: Fail-Safe and Fail-Secure. Fail-Safe locking devices such as magnetic locks release when they lose power. Fail-Secure locking devices such as electric strikes unlock when power is applied and may be manually released from inside a secured area. This determines the manner in which your power solution removes or provides power and the sequence and timing of each action.Access control power supplies come in both AC and DC versions and some provide multiple voltages simultaneously. Features include independently trigger controlled Fail-Safe/Fail-Secure outputs, power supervision, battery charging and fire alarm interface. Wall and rack mount models are also available.To comply with NFPA requirements, there are two classifications of locking devices that need to be addressed: Fail-Safe and Fail-Secure Some systems may also require the installation of panic hardware devices. Upon activation, the devices' high current power demand can reach up to 16amps, but not all power supplies can handle these high inrush currents.  As a result, you need to specify a power supply designed for this type of application.  Some operate a single panic hardware device and require optional modules to add features like timing functions, output relays, fire alarm disconnect, or power for additional panic hardware devices.  Therefore, these "base" models almost always require additional modules to deliver the functionality you need and may not be cost effective. More advanced models offer integrated features and supply a comprehensive solution. In addition to the convenience of these integrated devices, they are highly cost efficient with respect to total cost of ownership and installation. Video surveillance systems - typical power consumption guidelinesVideo surveillance systems typically run 24/7/365 placing high demands on power supplies. These video power supplies need to deliver a clean and consistent source of 24VAC or 12VDC power to assure uninterrupted operation. Depending on the video component's specific power requirements and its location, there is a wide selection of power supplies to select from. They can be wall or rack mounted, designed for use indoors or outdoors, and feature AC or DC outputs. Configurations typically range from 1 to 32 outputs and some models offer additional features like 115 or 230VAC input with current ratings as high as 25 amps, power LED indicators, and PTC or fused protected outputs. Certain models provide both 24VAC and 12VDC to power both types of surveillance cameras simultaneously. Environmental conditions can affect the performance of video components and the power supply when situated outdoors A few additional variables to consider when selecting video surveillance power supplies include: Environmental conditions: Temperature differences due to change of seasons, day or  night, can often be extreme and can have a direct affect on the performance of both the video components and the power supply when located outdoors. Enclosures for outdoor power supplies should be rated to withstand the elements.Ground Isolation: In some cases, the surveillance cameras are not equipped with internal electrical isolation. Should this be the case, it's important to specify a power supply with this feature. Video Transmission Systems: For years, the use of structured cable has been an inexpensive method for transmitting video and data between head end equipment and camera systems. The introduction of UTP transceiver hubs with integral camera power make it possible to transmit both video and data via structured cable along with the power needed for the cameras. This is accomplished via video balun/combiners which pass the power and data to the camera and send the video back to the head end equipment. New highly versatile devices with integral power provide system designers with a highly integrated solution. This new breed of integrated device greatly reduces the time and expense of configuring and installing separate components while helping to minimize bandwidth requirements for large security systems. Paul RizzutoTechnical Sales Manager Altronix Corp  

Latest LenelS2 news

PSIA approves the Secure Credential Interoperability (SCI) 1.0 specification
PSIA approves the Secure Credential Interoperability (SCI) 1.0 specification

The Physical Security Interoperability Alliance (PSIA) announces it has approved the Secure Credential Interoperability (SCI) 1.0 specification. The PSIA has been working with a broad group of industry pioneers in the access control industry to come up with this specification, which is likely to have a significant influence on the future of secure mobile credentials. Mohammad Soleimani, the Chief Technology Officer of Kastle Systems and the Chairman of the SCI Work Group, introduced this concept to the organisation in 2020 and has had a strong influence in engaging other companies in its development. Compatible secure credential “A standard for secure mobile credentials has been long overdue in the industry. SCI relies on established standards and the Public Key Infrastructure, to provide a simple, but elegant solution,” said Soleimani. SCI addresses the need for a universally compatible secure credential for the physical access control industry in the form of cards, fobs, mobile devices, and wearables. Progress has been dramatic, with the technology being demonstrated at a PSIA technical meeting in August featuring apps from IDEMIA and Johnson Controls and a Kastle reader developed by WaveLynx. “It has been our mission from day one, to drive secure credentials and interoperability into the market” said Laurie Aaron, Executive Vice President at WaveLynx Technologies Corp. “Joining PSIA to collaborate and execute on a standard that is made available to all, has been a fast track to mission success.” Different mobile platforms The SCI specification helps the industry to take steps towards the last mile of credential evolution" One of the important characteristics of SCI is its interoperability across different mobile platforms including iOS and Android or devices with the ability to generate ephemeral key pair, which can be communicated over various protocols such as BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy), NFC (Near Field Communication), and UWB (Ultra-wide band). “The SCI specification helps the industry to take steps towards the last mile of credential evolution where interoperability of credentials can exist. The simplicity of the use of a public key leveraging standards and best practices ensure a secure and open way to manage credentials that takes proprietary out of the picture.” says Jason Ouellette, the Head of Technology and Business Innovation for Johnson Controls Access Control and Video Solutions business. Security industries’ efforts Participants in the spec development include, ASSA ABLOY, Deister Electronics, Farpointe Data (a dormakaba company), HID, IDEMIA, Kastle Systems, LenelS2, rf IDEAS, SentryCard, Siemens, and Johnson Controls. “This is an important milestone in the security industries’ efforts to enable flexible, interoperable and scalable solutions,” states Peter Boriskin, Chief Technology Officer for ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions Americas. “It will be essential to consider how this and other standards apply across various industries, and how current and emerging standards impact each other.”

Traka receives factory certification for its key and asset management solution under the LenelS2 OpenAccess Alliance Program (OAAP)
Traka receives factory certification for its key and asset management solution under the LenelS2 OpenAccess Alliance Program (OAAP)

Traka announced that the company has received LenelS2 factory certification for OnGuard access control solution, as a LenelS2 OpenAccess Alliance Program (OAAP) partner. Traka’s key and asset management system interfaces with the OnGuard access control system, and provides seamless, single-credential access to property secured by Traka. LenelS2 OAAP factory certification “Traka has completed the required factory testing at LenelS2, to validate the functionality of its interface to OnGuard. This partner interface provides regional security and control over important company assets,” said John Marchioli, Director of Strategic Alliances and OAAP Product Management at LenelS2. John Marchioli adds, “We look forward to their continued involvement in the LenelS2 OpenAccess Alliance Program.” Traka - LenelS2 partnership The combination of Traka and OnGuard allows companies to control access and permissions" “We’re excited about this latest certification with LenelS2. Our continued partnership ensures our mutual customers have the latest in innovative access management solutions,” said Wayne Stant, Product Director at Traka. Wayne Stant adds, “The combination of Traka and OnGuard allows companies to control access and permissions, monitored by OnGuard, to track who checks out vital keys and equipment. It simplifies and improves security, while reducing administration overhead.” Electronic key and equipment management solutions Traka provides electronic key and equipment management solutions, allowing organisations to secure, manage, and audit the use of their important physical assets, including facilities, equipment, machinery, and vehicles. Traka’s products can be used standalone or integrated with many of the world’s renowned access control systems.

Carrier provides Emory Musculoskeletal Institute with innovative, intelligent healthy buildings solutions at new cutting-edge medical facility
Carrier provides Emory Musculoskeletal Institute with innovative, intelligent healthy buildings solutions at new cutting-edge medical facility

Carrier Global Corporation, a global provider of healthy, safe, sustainable, and intelligent building and cold chain solutions is delivering a full suite of innovative building technologies at Emory Healthcare’s new cutting-edge Musculoskeletal Institute (MSKI) in Atlanta, Georgia. Advanced solutions Carrier and Emory are collaborating to implement advanced solutions from Carrier’s Healthy Buildings Program – including HVAC, building automation, fire detection, access, and video management and digital services – at this state-of-the-art facility. Carrier’s portfolio features products that optimise indoor environments to improve occupant experience, operational efficiency, and inspire confidence in everything from physical safety and security to improved health, productivity, and cognitive performance. Eco-friendly building design Emory’s vision to be a model of transformative practices serves as the inspiration for the eco-friendly design" “Emory’s vision to be a model of transformative practices and sustainable choices at every level serves as the inspiration for the eco-friendly design of the building,” said Scott D. Boden, MD, Director of Emory MSKI and Professor and Chair of the Department of Orthopaedics, Emory University School of Medicine. To deliver this vision, it was important for Emory to partner with an innovative building technologies company like Carrier that provides the most advanced solutions. Intelligent technologies “At Carrier, we recognise the potential for indoor environments to help shape a healthier future. We are pleased to provide Emory’s MSKI with our full suite of intelligent building technologies. It’s through relationships built on a shared vision of innovation, that we can see the full potential of our technologies,” said Mead Rusert, President, Automated Logic Corporation, a Carrier Company. “I am confident that patients and staff will see and feel the benefits of the technologies in this world-class facility.” From the most fundamental elements of safety and security to the cognitive and health benefits of improved air quality and ventilation, Carrier’s high-performing building solutions at the Emory MSKI facility enhance the occupant experience. WebCTRL® building automation system WebCTRL helps customers achieve their sustainability and energy-efficiency goals by optimizing equipment At the core of the enhancements is the Automated Logic WebCTRL® building automation system, a powerful web-based platform that provides the MSK Facilities Team with software tools and insight to keep occupants comfortable while managing energy consumption and to identify, prioritise and analyse operational issues. WebCTRL helps customers achieve their sustainability and energy-efficiency goals by optimising equipment and proactively identifying issues. Carrier’s Abound IoT platform will integrate into WebCTRL and will monitor indoor air quality and operational performance, displaying the data on user-friendly dashboards in the main lobby and on MSK’s website. Safety and security MSK chose products from Carrier’s Fire & Security portfolio, including LenelS2 and Edwards, to enhance the safety and security of the facility. The LenelS2 OnGuard® access control system secures the facility by leveraging mobile credentialing technology through the MyWay app, eliminating a significant number of access touchpoints and affording a safer, more secure, healthier experience for building occupants. In addition, through LenelS2’s continued collaboration with Milestone Systems, a provider of video management software, MSKI operators benefit from a unified security management system that incorporates access control, video surveillance, and other technologies to help keep people and property safe. EST4 enhances system survivability through advanced encryption and safeguards, managing cyber threats EST4 emergency communications system The facility also utilises the Edwards EST4 premier emergency communications system. Featuring new network architecture, EST4 enhances system survivability through advanced encryption and safeguards, managing today's cyber threats. The system also benefits from Edwards’ Signature Optica™ detectors which distinguish between different types of fires, enhancing the protection of people and property, while reducing the number of false alarms that cause business interruption and unnecessary responses by fire departments. Location Located in Emory’s Executive Park health innovation district, Emory’s MSKI is a six-story,180,000 square-foot building that focuses on innovation, improving the patient experience and research while providing all musculoskeletal services in one convenient location for patients.

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