Lenel offers web enabled applications with OnGuard 2006
Lenel offers web enabled applications with OnGuard 2006

OnGuard 2006 seamlessly integrates access control, ID credential issuance and management, alarm monitoring, digital video surveillance and management, intelligent video, biometric technology integration, intrusion detection, visitor management and smart card functionality.  OnGuard 2006 marks Lenel’s entry into an XML Web Services architectural platform, with the introduction of web-enabled applications.  The web platform offers ease of deployment and maintenance, and system users can launch the applications from a PC using a standard web browser.  Another new component is Lenel IntelligentAudio™, an automated digital audio content analysis tool that can recognize, analyse and classify objects (information) in recorded audio files.  OnGuard 2006 is the first offering in the marketplace that enables biometric data to be used for both physical and logical access control.  OnGuard 2006 offers the first digital video management software that includes a suite of seamlessly integrated intelligent video tools that can be used for forensic video analysis.  Lenel is the first company to include these tools for all users without charge, as a basic component of the software.  OnGuard 2006 integrates with the Otis Compass destination dispatching system to provide secure access to banks of elevators.Other important capabilities include automatic rerouting of an alarm to an alternate workstation, integrated support for Integrated Engineering smart card encoders and biometric-smart card readers, digital video watermarking and authentication, and video matrix display on large-format video walls.Click here to download corporate brochure

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Lenel-ActivIdentity joint solution
Lenel-ActivIdentity joint solution

Lenel has partnered with ActivIdentity to jointly market a solution for physical access to facilities and logical access to networks.  The joint solution offers many benefits, including increased security and lower total cost of operation.  In addition, the Lenel-ActivIdentity solution will be a primary component for a corporation’s efforts to achieve compliance with regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley and HSPD-12. The ActivIdentity Enterprise Access Card consolidates employee logical credentials onto a single, secure smart card.  This provides a photo ID as well as a security device that enables secure Windows and network login, PC 'locking', secure remote access (VPN), secure email with digital signatures, and single sign-on to enterprise and desktop applications.The Lenel OnGuard® ID CredentialCenter™ application consolidates employee physical credentials, biometrics, and demographic information onto a single secure smart card, captures photo ID and prints the card.  The Lenel OnGuard security platform offers seamlessly integrated access control, alarm monitoring, identity management, digital video, intrusion detection, asset management, card production, and visitor management.The joint solution integrates the issuance and administration of cards and credentials for both physical and logical domains, and combines a photo ID, smart card and proximity card onto a single, easy to use device.  With the importance of physical and logical security, the integration of the Lenel and ActivIdentity products allows complete life cycle management of the credential.See the ActivIdentity Architecture diagram

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Lenel-ActivIdentity joint solution
Lenel-ActivIdentity joint solution

Lenel has partnered with ActivIdentity to jointly market a solution for physical access to facilities and logical access to networks.  The joint solution offers many benefits, including increased security and lower total cost of operation.  In addition, the Lenel-ActivIdentity solution will be a primary component for a corporation’s efforts to achieve compliance with regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley and HSPD-12. The ActivIdentity Enterprise Access Card consolidates employee logical credentials onto a single, secure smart card.  This provides a photo ID as well as a security device that enables secure Windows and network login, PC 'locking', secure remote access (VPN), secure email with digital signatures, and single sign-on to enterprise and desktop applications.The Lenel OnGuard® ID CredentialCenter™ application consolidates employee physical credentials, biometrics, and demographic information onto a single secure smart card, captures photo ID and prints the card.  The Lenel OnGuard security platform offers seamlessly integrated access control, alarm monitoring, identity management, digital video, intrusion detection, asset management, card production, and visitor management.The joint solution integrates the issuance and administration of cards and credentials for both physical and logical domains, and combines a photo ID, smart card and proximity card onto a single, easy to use device.  With the importance of physical and logical security, the integration of the Lenel and ActivIdentity products allows complete life cycle management of the credential.See the ActivIdentity Architecture diagram

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Access control software - Expert commentary

Protect physical assets from cyber-attacks
Protect physical assets from cyber-attacks

Recent cyber-attacks have disabled and even shut down physical assets. Robust foundational security and training staff, able to recognise an attack can help mitigate the threat, as ABB’s Rob Putman explains. Edge devices and data analytics As cyber security specialists, we must navigate an ever-changing threat landscape, one that is made even more complex by the increased interconnectivity between Operational Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT), as companies look to leverage edge devices and data analytics, as well as remote connectivity, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the threat surface evolves, the industry must guard against attacks on key physical infrastructure, carried out by a range of malicious actors, including nation states and criminals intent on blackmail. The chemicals sector, a high-value target for cyber-criminals Cyber-criminals view the chemicals sector, as a high-value target, because of the potential cost In 2017, not long after a ransomware attack that targeted Maersk, the world’s largest shipping firm, made the news around the world. Another cyber-attack, this time targeting physical industrial assets, generated fewer headlines, and yet could have resulted in both real, as well as financial, damage. Cyber-criminals view the chemicals sector, as a high-value target, because of the potential cost, both financial and reputational, to the operator, should production be interrupted or stopped entirely. Cyber security vulnerabilities put physical assets at risk The attack in question, a ‘Triton’ custom malware attack on a petro-chemical facility in Saudi Arabia, targeted a safety system, taking over system controllers. Bugs in the code triggered an emergency shutdown, but could have led to the release of toxic and explosive gases. It was a vivid reminder of how cyber security vulnerabilities are increasingly putting companies’ key physical assets at risk. Two more-recent high-profile incidents illustrate my point. In February, a Florida water treatment plant was hacked. The malicious actor remotely accessed the system for three to five minutes, during which time they opened various functions on the screen, including one that controls the amount of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the water. The hacker changed the NaOH from about 100 parts per million to 11,100 parts per million, which could have resulted in a mass poisoning event. Colonial Pipeline cyber-attack incident Then, in May, the Colonial Pipeline system that originates in Houston, Texas and carries gasoline, and jet fuel, suffered a ransomware attack. Using a VPN, hackers targeted back-office IT systems, forcing Colonial to shut down IT hosts and network infrastructure, severing communication with those OT systems that are responsible for communicating ‘transactional data’ associated with fuel delivery. In this instance, a single compromised password disrupted Colonial’s ability to invoice its customers. This dependency on OT data stopped pipeline and business operations, and the company was elected to pay the hackers an initial ransom of US$ 4.4 million, in order to restore operations. The Colonial attack was multi-dimensional, in that it not only impacted Colonial’s business, but also the wider US economy and national security, since the pipeline transports nearly half of the east coast's fuel supplies. Outdated IT system elevates physical risk The increased interconnectivity between IT and OT can also create vulnerabilit Attacks such as these prove that, armed with little more than a laptop, an email account and access to the dark web, determined hackers can cause disproportionate damage to physical infrastructure. As mentioned at the outset, the increased interconnectivity between IT and OT can also create vulnerability. Producers often want to know: Is it risky to connect a production asset or their operational environment to the Cloud? My answer is, if you do so without having done any risk audits around people, processes and technology, or without enhancing and maintaining that environment, then yes, that is risky. For example, we often observe that the life cycle of a production asset far outlasts the IT systems that are used to run it. Take a cement kiln. Several generations of plant operators may have come and gone, but that asset may still run, using legacy software, such as Windows XP and why not? Need to replace aging distributed control systems Well, that’s fine, if you are not concerned about having that asset compromised, and all that entails. A ‘flat’ IT network, an aging distributed control system, and machines with legacy versions of Microsoft Windows, all these elements, which are still commonplace in many industries, make it much easier for attackers to find and infiltrate a company, without needing sophisticated tools. The age-old mantra of not interfering with a piece of equipment or software that appears to be working, often applies to the individual assets. For example that cement kiln that are still controlled by the same Windows XP-based control software. However, if we’re honest, things have changed quite a bit, not because something was broken, but because innovation came in. That same kiln control system is most likely connected to other systems, than when first commissioned and that opens it to exposure to threats that it was never designed for. The human element There is a misconception that IoT-connected devices can open companies to risk There is a misconception that IoT-connected devices can open companies to risk, but many recent, high-profile cyber-attacks have been conducted from a laptop, by hacking someone’s VPN, or are a simple phishing/malware attack. In all these cases, the human element is partly to blame. Take the Florida attack. The compromised computer at the water treatment facility was reportedly running an outdated Windows 7 operating system and staff all used the same password, in order to gain remote access via the Teamviewer app, which the hacker was then able to use. Physical and human assets, key to robust cyber security Discussion on the best way to mitigate the threat is often framed solely around specific technical solutions and ignores the fact that robust foundational cyber security is really driven by two very different, but equally important, types of capital: physical assets (e.g. production machinery), and human assets. The truth is that smart digital software and industry-renowned cyber security applications, while critical, are in many cases, only as good as the weakest human link in the chain. Industry would, therefore, do well to ask itself the following question: Do we have a security problem, or a complacency problem? At this juncture, it is important to point out that the majority of companies that ABB works with, are at least aware of the threat posed by cyber attackers, and the potential impact of an attack, on their revenues, reputation and bottom line. User error and human-generated exposures Making sure staff are aware of the threat and training them to respond properly, if they are targeted, is vital However, user error and human-generated exposures are where most of these attacks occur. Those human failures are mostly not due to malicious intent from employees, but to the lack of training of the employees on secure behavior. Making sure staff are aware of the threat and training them to respond properly, if they are targeted, is vital. However, there are also age demographics at play here. Much of the operations employee base is heading towards retirement and often, there is no plan or ability to backfill these people. Need to invest in new digital and automated technologies If you think you don't have enough people now, in order to stay on top of basic care and feeding of the OT environment, with regards to security, what is that going to be like in 20 years? For this reason, there must be a major industry reset, when it comes to its workforce. Companies must invest in new digital and automated technologies, not only to ensure that they stay ahead of the curve and mitigate risk, but also to attract the next generation of digitally literate talent. Robust cyber security is built on solid foundations When we talk about foundational cyber security, we mean fundamentals, such as patching, malware protection, high-fidelity system backups, an up-to-date anti-virus system, and other options, such as application allow-listing and asset inventory. These basic controls can help companies understand their system setup and the potential threats, identify vulnerabilities, and assess their risk exposure. The Pareto principle states that around 80% of consequences come from 20% of the causes. In the context of cyber security, that means 80% of exposure to risk comes from 20% of the lack of security. If companies do the foundational things right, they can manage out a significant amount of this risk. Importance of maintaining and upgrading security controls However, having basic security controls, such as anti-virus software in place, is just the first step on that journey. Equally important is having someone within the organisation, with the requisite skill set, or the extra labour bandwidth, to operate, maintain and update those security controls, as they evolve. Educating, training and recruiting existing employees, and the next generation of talent, along with forging partnerships with trusted technology providers, will ensure that industry can leverage the latest digital technologies, in order to drive business value, and secure physical assets against cyber-attacks.

The robotic transformation of the security industry
The robotic transformation of the security industry

The COVID-19 pandemic is only accelerating the expansion of Automation, Robotics, Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), and changing how people live their daily lives. This expansion leads the way with technologies that are developed to solve problems, improve operations, streamline processes and assist people, to focus on learning new skills, creativity, and imagination. Transformation of the physical security industry One of the latest industries to be permanently transformed is physical security. The era of utilising security cameras is slowly changing into more advanced and more efficient technological applications - security robotic solutions. SMP Robotics is a California-based company, which is a pioneer in developing robotic technologies, powered by AI, to assist, improve and deliver on new expectations in today’s world. One of their services is smart surveillance systems. This represents a proactive approach to security. The company, SMP Robotics’ Founder and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Leo Ryzhenko, stated “Autonomous robotic technologies will become a driving force in future security solutions.” Robotics and AI in autonomous security solutions The robots can patrol 24/7, counteracting intrusion and communicating via voice message with guards The company uses robotics and AI technology to implement autonomous security solutions, which reduce liability and overhead, as well as improving the quality of services. Robotic guards are capable of patrolling all types of facilities, in both urban and rural contexts. The robots can patrol 24/7, counteracting intrusion and communicating via voice message with guards. The inspection robots, deployed by SMP Robotics, are easily integrated with many existing security technologies, armed with obstacle avoidance and anti-collision measures, automatically recharge, and can recognise faces up to 50 metres. As the world grows increasingly complex, technology like this is essential to ensure safety for all. AI-enabled autonomous video monitoring ground vehicles The advancements in technological breakthroughs of SMP Robotics position the company and its AI-powered, autonomous video monitoring ground vehicles, to be the most adaptable to any industry, cost-effective for clients’ business needs, in providing various types of services from public safety, crime prevention, to asset protection and physical security. SMP Robotics continues to implement new innovative solutions and groundbreaking technologies in its latest generation of autonomous models. Currently, many were already deployed or in a process to be delivered to a number of key clients, in various industries throughout the globe, from oil & gas, nuclear power plants to data centers, healthcare facilities, and amusement parks. Smart security robots Tal Turner, the Vice President (VP) of Business Development and Partnerships, SMP Robotics, said “We provide autonomous, artificial intelligence, all-weather, all-surface, smart security robots that are turnkey and operate independently on their own, using real-time obstacle avoidance, face recognition, and other cutting-edge technological advancements.” According to Coherent Market Insights, the Robots as a Service (RaaS) market direction will grow by 15.9% by 2028 and reach the threshold of 41.3 billion dollars. SMP Robotics stands at the forefront of the security robotic revolution, making an impactful change to make the world a safer place.

The EU called for a ban on police use of facial recognition but not commercial use. Why?
The EU called for a ban on police use of facial recognition but not commercial use. Why?

Recently, the European Parliament called for a ban on police use of facial recognition. In the US, too, some cities have restricted police use of facial recognition. The first question that comes to mind is - why ban police from using technology that is allowed to private companies? Point of difference The key difference between the way police use facial recognition and the way commercial facial recognition products work is that: The police get a picture of a suspect from a crime scene and want to find out: "Who is the person in the picture?" That requires as wide a database as possible. Optimally - photos and identities of all the people in the world. Commercial facial recognition products such as those used by supermarkets, football stadiums, or casinos answer different questions: "Is the person in the picture on the employees' list? Is the person in the picture on a watch-list of known shoplifters?" To answer these questions doesn't require a broad database but rather a defined list of employees or a watch-list of specific people against whom there is an arrest warrant or a restraining order. Use of facial recognition AnyVision helps organisations leverage facial recognition ethically to identify known persons of interest "Facial Recognition Apps Should Be Provided to the Police with an Empty Database". This is exactly the subject of the open letter sent by AnyVision, to the British Biometrics and Surveillance Camera Commissioner, Prof. Fraser Sampson, titled: "Facial Recognition Apps Should Be Provided to the Police with an Empty Database". AnyVision recently raised $235M from Softbank and another leading VCs is a visual AI platform company that helps organisations across the globe leverage facial recognition ethically to identify known persons of interest, including shoplifters, felons, and security threats. Ethical use of facial recognition AnyVision CEO Avi Golan wrote, "The ethical use of facial recognition is a thorny one and requires a nuanced discussion. Part of that discussion has to explain how facial recognition works, but, just as important, the discussion must also involve how the technology is used by police departments and what checks and balances are built into their processes.” “We recommend building their watchlists from the ground up based on known felons, persons of interest, and missing persons. Some facial recognition solution providers have scrapped billions of photos and identities of people from social networks, usually without their consent." "Unfortunately, this method of facial recognition has justifiably angered privacy groups and data protection agencies around the globe and damaged the public trust in accuracy and reliability of facial recognition systems.” Preventing invasion of citizen’s privacy We believe an unjustified invasion of citizens' privacy can be prevented, false arrests can be reduced" “We believe that lists of suspects should be limited and justified. In this way, unjustified invasion of citizens' privacy can be prevented, false arrests can be reduced and public confidence in technology can be increased.” Golan added: "AnyVision is willing to share its industry insights and best practices from our vast research experience with leading global players, including name-brand retailers, global hospitality and entertainment companies, and law enforcement agencies from around the world.” Balancing public order and crime prevention “If the regulations set forth by Surveillance Camera Code of Practice are committed to the principles outlined above, then law enforcement agencies can strike the right balance between the need to maintain public order and prevent crime with the rights of every person to privacy and non-discrimination before the law." Recently Clearview AI CEO told Wired; the company has scraped 10 billion photos from the web - 3 times more than was previously known.

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Soloinsight to showcase their CloudGate VIAM platform at the CREtech New York 2021
Soloinsight to showcase their CloudGate VIAM platform at the CREtech New York 2021

Soloinsight Inc., a workflow automation platform company, will be featured at this year’s CREtech event in New York City. The company’s CEO, Carter Kennedy, will be a panelist for the show’s ‘The Ever-Evolving and Future of Access Control’ session on Wednesday, October 13th at 11 am EST. As a company that was recently awarded the Security Industry Association’s (SIA) new product showcase award in the hosted solutions/managed services category, Soloinsight is no stranger to innovating in the commercial real estate and access control industries. Workflow automation platform Soloinsight has integrated with some of the biggest names in the access control and visitor identity spaces Their product, CloudGate, is a visitor identity and access management (VIAM) platform that delivers unprecedented security and an intuitive guest and host experience at multiple locations via the cloud, on-prem, or hybrid infrastructures. Since the introduction of CloudGate, Soloinsight has integrated with some of the biggest names in the access control and visitor identity spaces, such as Johnson Controls, LenelS2, and Honeywell, to deliver a secure and seamless security workflow automation platform. With a platform that touches nearly every point in visitor and access management — from its mobile concierge technology, self-service kiosks, and turnstile integrations, Soloinsight is poised to be a game-changer in the commercial real estate industry. “We are excited to partner with access control manufacturers and property management companies to alleviate these challenges and advance their access control systems to the next level.” - President and CTO, Farhan Masood.

LifeSafety Power to showcase their intelligent networked power supplies at the GSX 2021
LifeSafety Power to showcase their intelligent networked power supplies at the GSX 2021

LifeSafety Power will showcase its award-winning intelligent networked power supplies at booth 1463 during this year’s GSX show, September 27-29 in Orlando. Featured products include: FPO Generation 2 - Recently redesigned and re-engineered with updated features and capabilities, the FlexPower® FPO Generation 2 (Gen2) power supply line brings additional enhancements to both installers and users in the access control market. Network communications module FlexPower Gen2 includes the groundbreaking OutSmart™ visual voltage indication across all boards, visually showing the technician the output voltage of the power supply boards and each distributed output. Optional RS-485 capability on FPO and M8 devices allows larger managed systems on fewer network drops with the NLX NetLink™ network communications module. Refinements like built-in low battery disconnect and battery current sensor foster cleaner installations Added data points such as AC input voltage and main output current measurements on the FPO power supply and output cycle counts on the M8 yield a comprehensive view of overall system health. Refinements like built-in low battery disconnect and battery current sensor foster cleaner installations. Access control boards E12M and E12S Enclosures - One of the most spacious enclosures in the industry, the E12 is available in Unified Power or ProWire with dimensions of 48 (H) x 36 (W) x 8 (D). The E12 handles larger enterprise access control deployments–accommodating more access control boards, power supplies and managed outputs in a single enclosure for hardware and deployment savings. The E12 houses up to three FlexPower FPO power supply boards to allow up to 750 Watts of power to locking hardware, access control boards and auxiliary devices. It comes in two configurations: the E12M integrates with authentic Mercury Systems and handles 24 doors of access control; E12S integrates with Software House (SWH) controllers to handle up to 32 doors. Security management software NetLink lets users remotely monitor, control, program and report on system power Access Control Integrations - LifeSafety Power’s solutions integrate with several industry-preferred access control security management software platforms, including Genetec Security Center; OnGuard® for Lenel S2; and C•CURE 9000 from SWH. Security Center Integration for Genetec - Leveraging the Genetec integration between NetLink network communication device and Security Center, users can seamlessly add NetLink devices into the software platform, allowing real-time alerts to appear directly within the interface. From Security Center, users receive detailed data on the health and viability of power, connected locks and other devices. NetLink lets users remotely monitor, control, program and report on system power and connected devices and features patented battery management that includes health reporting, remote battery testing, email/SNMP alerts and other proactive notifications. Advanced power management OnGuard Integration for LenelS2 - The LenelS2 integration allows LifeSafety Power’s NetLink NL4 and NLX Network Communication Modules to interface with OnGuard access control software versions 8.0, in addition to 7.6, for advanced power management of enterprise access control systems. NetLink adds proactive monitoring and management capabilities to LifeSafety Power’s power systems, interfacing directly to the OnGuard platform, with all power system alerts indicated on the OnGuard software. NetLink adds proactive monitoring and management capabilities to LifeSafety Power’s power systems CCURE integration for SWH - The native integration with SWH C•CURE 9000 and LifeSafety Power’s intelligent network monitoring modules allows users to receive and centrally manage alerts and notifications through the software, for monitoring and control of PSX power and distribution modules sold and supported through SWH. Critical networking notifications are driven directly into C•CURE 9000, relaying real-time data and analytics on the health and viability of iSTAR door controller power, lock power and battery condition. Streamlining power installations ProWire Unified Power Systems/Helix - ProWire Unified Power Systems, the highest level of integration between a power system and an access control solution, are an installer’s blueprint for consistent, streamlined power installations. ProWire makes it simple to create a connected power campus, eliminating installation variability for repeatable and professional results. Network-connected ProWire systems can interface directly into Mercury Security or SWH C•Cure 9000 platforms, allowing users to receive, manage and control alerts and notifications. ProWire is compatible with Multi-Site Manager (MSM) Enterprise™, which yields advanced analytics so end-users can actively network, monitor and manage connected power solutions for greater uptime and dependability. Mission-critical applications Helix reduces the risk of system downtime or outage and features network management Helix AC/DC is the only solution for mission-critical applications in government, finance, medical and high-tech industry vertical markets. Designed for seamless failover protection with the automatic backup switchover of AC or DC power, Helix reduces the risk of system downtime or outage and features network management for predictive reporting that optimises and maintains the highest levels of performance. AC Helix monitors separate AC branch circuits, reporting trouble with a primary branch immediately and instantly transferring power to backup for uninterrupted system operations. DC Helix uses redundant power supplies to instantly transfer power to the backup supply on the failure of the primary supply. Helix is now available in standard, Unified Power and ProWire configurations to provide the ultimate protection to any access control power system.

LifeSafety Power attains LenelS2 factory certification under the LenelS2 OpenAccess Alliance Program (OAAP)
LifeSafety Power attains LenelS2 factory certification under the LenelS2 OpenAccess Alliance Program (OAAP)

LifeSafety Power, an ASSA ABLOY company, has announced that it has received LenelS2 factory certification and joined the LenelS2 OpenAccess Alliance Program (OAAP). LifeSafety Power’s NetLink NL4 and NLX Network Communication Modules interface with OnGuard access control software versions 8.0 and 7.6, to provide advanced power management for enterprise access control systems. NetLink modules interface with OnGuard platform NetLink adds proactive monitoring and management capabilities to LifeSafety Power’s power systems NetLink adds proactive monitoring and management capabilities to LifeSafety Power’s power systems and interfaces directly to the OnGuard platform, and is engineered to handle applications, which require network management. Leveraging this new interface, all power system alerts are now viewable in the OnGuard software. “LifeSafety Power has completed required factory testing at LenelS2, to validate the functionality of its interface to the OnGuard system. This interface to the OnGuard system allows users to add powerful remote monitoring capabilities to LifeSafety Power’s access control power systems, through an intuitive web browser interface,” said John Marchioli, OAAP Product Management, LenelS2. LifeSafety Power and LenelS2 partnership John Marchioli adds “We look forward to their continued involvement in the LenelS2 OpenAccess Alliance Program (OAAP).” “The ability to receive alerts and notifications on all power-connected systems through the OnGuard system brings greater intelligence to access control solutions,” said John Olliver, the Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing for LifeSafety Power, adding “For the end-users and systems integrators, managed power improves the ability to preemptively assess power status for greater reliability and uptime.”

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