Multiplexers - Expert commentary

Technology evolution leads to changes in security control room furniture
Technology evolution leads to changes in security control room furniture

Technology is changing the look and function of today’s security control rooms. Old-school CRT (cathode-ray tube) monitors are giving way to the thinner, flat screen monitors in the control room environment, but the transition is gradual. Randy Smith of Winsted still sees many control rooms that need to make the conversion, which is a boon to his company’s business. Furniture today is designed differently to accommodate the thinner monitors, often with larger screens. Need for integrated rack systems With the increase of IP-based systems comes the need for integrated rack systems that include advanced functionality such as cable management, adds Jim Coleman, National Sales Manager, AFC Industries. Server rooms are environmentally controlled by cooling systems and power systems monitored on the IP network. Low-profile flat screens allow centres to utilise space vertically, thus creating a smaller footprint for the consoles. Additionally, with IP-based systems, workstations will have a smaller footprint because there is less cumbersome equipment. In most cases the servers are stored in a secured, climate controlled environment to eliminate overheating of the servers and maintain their security, says Coleman. This environment also helps with cable and power management. AFC builds technical furniture racks that adhere to the precise needs of computer network server room operators. The company designs and fabricates LAN workbenches with versatile functionalities, and server room workstation racks that are scalable. There is a complete line of IT workbenches, IT computer racks and computer server rack mounts with flexible mounting options. In most cases the servers are stored in a secured, climate controlled environment to eliminate overheating of the servers and maintain their security Flexible control room designs Matko Papic, Chief Technology Officer of Evans Consoles, says the transition from bulky CRT equipment to flat-screen (lower profile) monitors was a major disruption in control room design; it changed the whole dynamic. Another evolution is the use of IP video streaming, which allows more flexibility in manipulation of audio-video content, and requires more flexible control room designs. Another shift, driven by larger, higher-definition monitors, is a shift to fewer monitors that display more information. Instead of a smaller monitor for each information stream, larger monitors now consolidate that information into “dashboard” displays. Looking ahead, control rooms will need to be more flexible, both in the initial design and the ability to adapt to changing technology, says Papic. Legacy customers who are currently using PCs may be moving to more remote applications. Sit-stand equipment will continue to be increasingly prevalent. “There will be more emphasis on flexibility, technology integration, and the ability to change over the life of the system,” says Papic. Consolidation of multiple operations into a single system A trend in security is consolidation of multiple physical operations into a single system, says Papic. As a result, more customers are taking more interest in alarm management and situational awareness. How is the technology being used in terms of alarm triggers? How can the systems react rapidly and provide information to a larger audience in the control room? These questions impact how control rooms are designed, and Evans Consoles can adapt lessons learned from other markets to these trends in the security arena. Greater use of technology is inevitable, says Coleman of AFC Industries. “It is virtually impossible for humans to monitor all security data at the street level in our cities,” he says. “As computers become more powerful and their programs more all-encompassing, we will see a greater shift to robotic and technology uses that will provide enhanced monitoring capabilities and safety Read our Control Rooms series here

Choosing the right power supplies for security installations
Choosing the right power supplies for security installations

 Selecting the optimum power supply for a system is critical to an installation  When it comes to selecting power supplies, knowledge is power. Determining the power requirements of every systems product, taking into account their integration with one another is critical to ensure that you are selecting and installing the power solutions most appropriate for your installation. Such information will enable you to select the power supplies that will be required to keep your security system running efficiently in the long run. Paul Rizzuto, Technical Sales Manager, Altronix Corp outlines some of the key factors to consider when choosing the right power solution for security installations - including those of video surveillance systems and access control systems - and fire alarm systems. Questions to consider when selecting the optimum power supply Before commencing the evaluation and selection process, three fundamental questions/issues need be addressed:Approvals and conformance to norms: Are there any specific agency approvals that the installation must conform to?Each state, county and even municipality has their own requirements regarding agency approvals. There are a variety of compliance issues such as UL listings for video, access control and fire/life safety that need to be adhered to along with specific local codes. It's imperative that you check with the local AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) to find out what agency listings you must conform to during the design process to assure your security system is in compliance before installing any components and power supplies. Features required: What are the application specific features required for the installation? Selecting power supplies for a security or fire alarm system is a complex process due to a number of variables Before starting the design process, a comprehensive analysis of the facility's security systems are required to determine feature sets of the power supplies. Up until recently, selecting power supplies often required the need to combine various components to deliver the functionality desired. For example, does the system need battery back-up in case of a power failure?  All that has changed with the introduction of a new breed of integrated power solutions that deliver both cost and installation advantages. Quantity, location and power requirements of the security system componentsWhat is the number of devices in the system, the power requirements for each, and their physical location?This information is necessary to determine the size and quantity of the power supplies, how many security devices they will run, and where they will be physically located.  It is always a good rule of thumb to add 20% more power to your calculations as a safety factor.  Alarm signal generation is a key consideration when dealing with power consumption in fire alarms systems Dealing with power consumption issues in fire alarm systems Power consumption is a primary issue when configuring fire alarm systems. One of the most critical considerations revolves around how alarm signals are activated. When an alarm condition exists, Notification Appliance Circuits (NAC) are output from the Fire Alarm Control Panel (FACP) to activate notification appliances such as strobes and horns commonly used to indicate an emergency situation. The number of notification appliances to be activated, along with the current draw for each device and its distance from the FACP, sometimes makes the deployment of NAC Power Extenders a necessary system component. For example, in large commercial installations or multi-tenant buildings, the total current draw of the notification appliances may well exceed the power output of the FACP. In these instances, one or more NAC Power Extenders need to be installed for those notification appliances where the wire runs are too long for the FACP to deliver sufficient power.  Features to consider when selecting a NAC Power Extender: Number of Class A or Class B indicating circuits.Total power rating (ex. 6.5 amp, 8 amp or 10 amp).Number of Aux. power outputs with or without battery backup.Programmable outputs: SynchronizationTemporal Code 3Input to output follower mode.Enclosure capacity: Room for battery backupAmple knockouts and room for wiringAgency approvals UL, MEA, CSFM and FM.NAC Power Extenders are available with programmable features that maintain horn/strobe synchronization by either producing internally generated sync protocols utilized by major signal manufacturers, or by electronically repeating these sync protocols from the FACP outputs. Power supply requirements for access control systems - key standards to follow    To ensure safety any device designated to lock or unlock an exit must be connected to the fire alarm systemAccess control systems manage entry and exit points at a facility by means of controlled locking devices. NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) requires that any device or system intended to actuate the locking or unlocking of exits, must be connected to the facility's fire alarm system so that all doors will release when an alarm signal is generated.To comply with NFPA requirements, there are two classifications of locking devices that need to be addressed: Fail-Safe and Fail-Secure. Fail-Safe locking devices such as magnetic locks release when they lose power. Fail-Secure locking devices such as electric strikes unlock when power is applied and may be manually released from inside a secured area. This determines the manner in which your power solution removes or provides power and the sequence and timing of each action.Access control power supplies come in both AC and DC versions and some provide multiple voltages simultaneously. Features include independently trigger controlled Fail-Safe/Fail-Secure outputs, power supervision, battery charging and fire alarm interface. Wall and rack mount models are also available.To comply with NFPA requirements, there are two classifications of locking devices that need to be addressed: Fail-Safe and Fail-Secure Some systems may also require the installation of panic hardware devices. Upon activation, the devices' high current power demand can reach up to 16amps, but not all power supplies can handle these high inrush currents.  As a result, you need to specify a power supply designed for this type of application.  Some operate a single panic hardware device and require optional modules to add features like timing functions, output relays, fire alarm disconnect, or power for additional panic hardware devices.  Therefore, these "base" models almost always require additional modules to deliver the functionality you need and may not be cost effective. More advanced models offer integrated features and supply a comprehensive solution. In addition to the convenience of these integrated devices, they are highly cost efficient with respect to total cost of ownership and installation. Video surveillance systems - typical power consumption guidelinesVideo surveillance systems typically run 24/7/365 placing high demands on power supplies. These video power supplies need to deliver a clean and consistent source of 24VAC or 12VDC power to assure uninterrupted operation. Depending on the video component's specific power requirements and its location, there is a wide selection of power supplies to select from. They can be wall or rack mounted, designed for use indoors or outdoors, and feature AC or DC outputs. Configurations typically range from 1 to 32 outputs and some models offer additional features like 115 or 230VAC input with current ratings as high as 25 amps, power LED indicators, and PTC or fused protected outputs. Certain models provide both 24VAC and 12VDC to power both types of surveillance cameras simultaneously. Environmental conditions can affect the performance of video components and the power supply when situated outdoors A few additional variables to consider when selecting video surveillance power supplies include: Environmental conditions: Temperature differences due to change of seasons, day or  night, can often be extreme and can have a direct affect on the performance of both the video components and the power supply when located outdoors. Enclosures for outdoor power supplies should be rated to withstand the elements.Ground Isolation: In some cases, the surveillance cameras are not equipped with internal electrical isolation. Should this be the case, it's important to specify a power supply with this feature. Video Transmission Systems: For years, the use of structured cable has been an inexpensive method for transmitting video and data between head end equipment and camera systems. The introduction of UTP transceiver hubs with integral camera power make it possible to transmit both video and data via structured cable along with the power needed for the cameras. This is accomplished via video balun/combiners which pass the power and data to the camera and send the video back to the head end equipment. New highly versatile devices with integral power provide system designers with a highly integrated solution. This new breed of integrated device greatly reduces the time and expense of configuring and installing separate components while helping to minimize bandwidth requirements for large security systems. Paul RizzutoTechnical Sales Manager Altronix Corp  

Latest MESSOA Technologies Inc. news

Digital Watchdog DW Spectrum IPVMS v2.5 video management software adds new storage and performance features
Digital Watchdog DW Spectrum IPVMS v2.5 video management software adds new storage and performance features

Digital Watchdog (DW™), the industry leader in digital recorders, surveillance cameras and related management software, announces the release of the latest update for DW Spectrum™ IPVMS. The new v2.5 software adds powerful new features including a bookmarks engine and storage backup, performance improvements and improved support for multi-sensor cameras. Easy approach to HD surveillance DW Spectrum IPVMS is an elegantly easy cutting-edge approach to HD surveillance, addressing the primary obstacles and limitations of managing enterprise-level HD video while offering the lowest total cost of deployment and ownership of any solution on the market. The software offers advanced search features to help you quickly find incidents or instantly review an exact date and time. The software is cross-platform, installs quickly and provides instant network mapping and discovery to start viewing your entire security system in minutes. DW Spectrum IPVMS is a perfect solution for any application that requires ease, speed, efficiency, and unprecedented image quality. “With the timely release of DW Spectrum 2.5, it continues to deliver unprecedented return on investment without the need for an annual maintenance agreement.” said Patrick Kelley, Director of IP Sales – North America, Digital Watchdog. “These new features are seamlessly incorporated into the DW Spectrum user interface, providing a dramatically easier user experience for all user levels than any other video management solution on the market.” DW Spectrum™ IPVMS features: New Mobile Apps - Brand new cross-platform mobile apps for iOS and Android with better performance, revamped design and consistent user experience across both Apple iOS and Google Android devices. Bookmarks - Users can create bookmarks for specific segments of archived video with names, descriptions, and tags either manually or via the Rules & Events engine. Storage Backup - Users can now set up scheduled or real-time archive backup of high-res, low-res, or all streams from selected cameras to local, NAS, or even cloud-based storage locations (e.g. ftp sites, Amazon Prime Storage, etc). PTZ Preset as an Action - Users can now set up rules to trigger a PTZ preset as an action (e.g. create a motion event on a fixed camera that triggers the PTZ to look at the spot where motion occurred). Alarm Layout - allows users to set display-camera-on-Alarm-Layout as an action (aka pop-up video on alarm). Live Video Text Overlay - allows users to create custom text overlays-as-an-action (including Generic Event API). New device support: Axis F44 Main Unit Axis Q6000E panoramic camera ACTi V23 4 Channel Encoder (with I/O Support) Messoa IP Cameras (with I/O Support) Hikvision DS-6704HFI 4 Channel Video Server Implemented "Advanced" Settings for DWC-BVI2IR cameras Improved support for DWC-PZV2M72T cameras Vista VK2-1080XVRDPTPMF camera now mapped for advanced PTZ Arecont RTSP camera support implemented Digital I/O support for Arecont cameras implemented Improvements to management software: Added "Connect" button to the "Test" dialogue during dialogue Updated viewing cell icons and improved styling for "info" data Calendar widget can now be pinned Added layout background support for video wall Transcoding is now enabled by default for video export from multi-sensor cameras (e.g. DWC-PZV2M72T) Added warning before export if export will result in video downscaling (applies only to very high resolution or multi-sensor cameras) "Timeline mode" renamed to "Time Mode". Change can be seen in timeline, timestamps in Event Logs, Audit Trail and Bookmark Log Added ability to sort Alarm/Event Rules by any column Improved "Server Settings" and "System Administration" dialogs - now changes can be applied without closing dialog Storage Analytics improvement - storage utilised by deleted/moved out cameras is displayed separately Storage usage optimisations and improvements Improved time synchronisation mechanism between Servers Improved error messages for some cases of push updates failure "Free Storage Space" is increased from 5Gb to 50Gb for NAS   Server SSL can now be disabled API documentation is improved and extended General Server stability improvements based on anonymous usage and crash statistics

MESSOA Maven IP cameras secure Tokyo shopping district
MESSOA Maven IP cameras secure Tokyo shopping district

The shopping District, or Shoutengai, in Koto-Ku, Tokyo is located next to a busy train station that gathers many restaurants, shops, and sake bars together in this newly vibrant neighbourhood. As the area becoming more commercially alive, there was an increasing concern for crimes taken place within the district, especially during late nights. For the purpose of crime prevention, the Shopping District Association began to consider deploying surveillance cameras at the crime hot spots as a way to strengthen the public safety in the neighbourhood. Yet with its limited finances, the association had to look for an effective solution at a lower cost that would cope with its tight budget. Solution With the help from MESSOA, more than 60 Maven series NCR365 IR bullet cameras and a dozen of NOD385 IR dome cameras were introduced in this project. Equipped with a 3MP CMOS sensor and removable IR-cut filter for 24/7 monitoring, these cameras deliver exceptional image quality for accurate identification at crime-prone spots. Both cameras support onboard memory with microSD card slot that utilises edge recording technology. Up to 64GB of HD quality CCTV footage can be recorded locally on each camera without the need of installing NVRs, saving a significant amount of installation costs. Structure-wise, both the NCR365 and NOD385 are IP67 certified, featuring built-in heater and weatherproof enclosure to ensure the cameras are capable of withstanding any harsh environments in Japan, particularly in winter times. Result By utilising the edge-based recording technology, the whole project eliminated the need for a centralised recording server or storage, helping the association saving a great deal of costs as planned. This solution did not compromise reliability thanks to SD card’s solid state without any moving parts like a hard drive. The files can be securely stored and easily retrieved when needed. The motorised lens with auto focus of the NCR35 provided benefits to the project as well by drastically facilitating the time-consuming installation. Technicians were able to get the job done fast with easy by taking advantage of remote configuration with simple mouse clicks. The simplified set up cut the installation process short and saved lots of labour costs as result.

Messoa, PlateSmart enter into integration partnership for effective license plate recognition solution
Messoa, PlateSmart enter into integration partnership for effective license plate recognition solution

Partnership comes fresh on heels of Messoa’s exhibition of its latest HD IP cameras specifically designed for ALPR at IFSEC 2015 PlateSmart automatic license plate recognition (ALPR) software-only solutions are known for working with cameras across the spectrum of the security industry. Messoa, one of the security industry’s premier video camera manufacturers, has consistently produced cameras that work effectively with PlateSmart’s products, making for a strong and productive association. The relationship between the two companies has now been cemented by recently joint announcement that PlateSmart and Messoa have entered into an official integration partnership agreement. Messoa’s HD IP cameras for ALPR applications at IFSEC 2015 The announcement comes fresh on the heels of Messoa’s successful exhibition at IFSEC 2015 in London, where it displayed its latest models of high-definition IP cameras specifically designed for ALPR use. Among the cameras on display was a model boasting 3 megapixels of resolution in addition to headlight suppression, built-in infrared (IR) illumination, and other features conducive to excellent ALPR performance. Pairing of PlateSmart’s HD ALPR engine with Messoa’s HD cameras In addition to the high-quality product offerings from both companies, the effectiveness of the PlateSmart-Messoa combination springs from the pairing of PlateSmart’s high-definition (HD) ALPR engine with Messoa’s HD cameras, which enables users to cover a wider area and capture multiple plates with only a single camera. According to PlateSmart CEO John Chigos, the partnership with Messoa fits perfectly with the Company’s market philosophy. “PlateSmart has always made a point of choosing best-of-breed channel partners,” he says. “With Messoa, we are able to offer our customers everything they could want in license plate recognition. Messoa gives them a fantastic video image while PlateSmart gives them our unparalleled accuracy, flexibility, and data integrity protection.” “We are very excited about the partnership with PlateSmart”, said Allan Lee, President of MESSOA Technologies Inc. “With the integration of MESSOA CatchAll™ engine and PlateSmart HD LPR engine, it makes the state-of-art LPR solution obtainable and affordable, which ultimately benefits to the public safety as well as increases management effectiveness for applications in need of LPR solution such as parking lots, campus and schools, for example.”