Geutebruck introduce new G-SIM security information management system
Geutebruck introduce new G-SIM security information management system

The new Geutebruck security information management system, G-SIM is the ultimate reliable assistant for managing, filtering and processing the vast quantities of security information generated by medium to large networked video security systems. It provides the best in video event handling and intuitive user operation, even for very extensive and highly complex systems with dozens of sites, thousands of cameras and numerous other alarm generating systems. G-SIM uses graphical representations which are quick and easy to understand and interpret, combined with familiar drag-and-drop functionality which only allows actions relevant to the prevailing situation. High levels of customisation provide each operator in the network with the information he needs in his own individually preferred format, quickly, intuitively and reliably. G-SIM’s key features include central user management, easy administration and operation using site plan-based control elements as well as the central reporting of all relevant operating and system events. Its system architecture is freely scalable and designed to enable effortless interaction between users whether they are within the network or access it remotely. G-SIM allows you to spread the processes involved in managing more powerful systems efficiently across a variety of workstations and to pass work from one operator to another to delegate or escalate tasks. G-SIM provides a perfect fit solution for each application and each user and comprehensive support for your own security concept. You can configure functions such as the live and recorded image display; the site plan-based control; the alarm management; the delegating and reporting tools; the complete documentation of all systems and operator actions as well as the sophisticated redundancy provision, to suit each application and each user.  The comprehensive user administration function and the universal audit trail together safeguard data protection and guarantee evidential quality of images and footage. G-SIM integrates seamlessly with all Geutebruck systems and with the vast range of third party interfaces they support, so it also facilitates the seamless processing and management of security information by subcontractors.  Key features: Complete flexibility for any number of networked workstations Intuitive operation using individually designed site-plan-based operator interfaces Ideal overview thanks to the seamlessly integrated video wall solutions Complete video stream management for live and recorded video Efficient alarm management with site plans, video and all other relevant information Comprehensive support for delegation, i.e. for the hand-over of event or alarm processing, the allocation of tasks and for switching internal system communication between users Perfect data protection as a result of the flexible administration of user rights and the complete audit trail High reliability backed up with sophisticated redundancy Freely scalable even for very extensive systems Management of all subcontractors and third party systems integrated into the Geutebruck system

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Geutebruck’s new G-Tect/VMX – professional detection, smart and simple
Geutebruck’s new G-Tect/VMX – professional detection, smart and simple

Geutebruck’s G-Tect/VMX is a new video motion detection solution for professional use, which is both extremely quick to set up and exceptionally reliable. It not only detects movement but differentiates between potentially relevant moving objects and background changes. G-Tect/VMX continuously analyses and evaluates all picture contents, and regularly adjusts its ‘understanding’ of the background. Thanks to the latest smart algorithms which continually adapt to the current image contents, G-Tect/VMX offers unprecedented accuracy at suppressing unwanted alarms caused by systematically occurring environmental effects such as moving foliage, rain, snow or headlights. It recognises these images changes resulting from weather as a systematically occurring background changes and therefore tolerates them.  Setting up a sterile zone where any intruder triggers an alarm is a simple mouse-clicking operation.  Configuring direction-dependent detection for a zone is quick and easy too. You can then copy settings across to other alarm zones and cameras with similar site conditions, for example to set up a series of cameras to monitor a fence. Finally there is a single intuitive global sensitivity control to optimize all the settings. – This minimalist design approach to system settings slashes the time required for system installation and makes it predictable. G-Tect/VMX is designed for seamless integration in the Geutebruck system world and comes with licence-free activation of Geutebruck’s classic VMD detector, to enable legendary dual sensor operation and the best possible protection of critical areas. Also being unveiled alongside this detection solution is Geutebruck’s new G-Tect/MoP pixelating function which maintains data protection privacy for public access areas by automatically masking moving objects in live displays or archived image data while still allowing authorised personnel access to the full image for serious incident investigation and evidential purposes. Other innovations on the Geutebruck stand at Security 2012 include: the G-Scope/1000 range of new compact video platforms for top performance in tight spots; a new range of G-VRaid units; the re_porter-XRdb with a hot swap database as well as G-SIM the exceptionally powerful new video management system for large complex installations. To see for yourself visit stand 409 in hall 2 at Security 2012 or go to www.geutebrueck.com for more information.

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VCA4IP, Geutebruck’s video content analysis, now available for third party IP cameras
VCA4IP, Geutebruck’s video content analysis, now available for third party IP cameras

Geutebruck video analysis algorithms are already deployed in more than 50,000 digital video cameras round the world.  Now, with its latest software offering, VCA4IP, Geutebruck is making these tried-and-tested professional video content analysis algorithms available for installation in third party IP cameras when used with re_porter or GeViScope CCTV systems. Activity detection (AD), video motion detection (VMD) and Dual-Sensor functions are each available separately by individual licence.  AD provides reliable movement detection for indoor and selected outdoor applications with a very low false alarm rate owing to the effective suppression of environmental influences.  For critical outdoor applications where you want to differentiate between objects of different sizes, movements in different directions and at different speeds, then VMD is the best choice. It can ensure that permitted movements don't trigger unnecessary alarms, by for instance, ignoring vehicles leaving a site, or small animals straying into the scene.  For exceptionally high targeting accuracy and even better suppression of unwanted alarms, Geutebruck's Dual-Sensor uses video motion detection and object classification algorithms in parallel, with alarms only being triggered when both sets of criteria are met.VCA4IP can process resolutions up to several megapixels.  Built-in diagnostics report sabotage and monitor the connection status and contrast levels to avoid the generation of false reports.  Any number of parameter profiles (day/night switches) can be stored for each camera channel.  All camera channels are easily configured in the standard user-friendly set-up screen. 

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Geutebruck's new 'fading long term memory' slashes the cost of video archiving
Geutebruck's new 'fading long term memory' slashes the cost of video archiving

Geutebruck CCTV systems can now retain high quality video for long periods using only a fraction of the normal storage capacity.  Their new ‘fading long term memory' (FLTM) option reflects the fact that, where different kinds of event are discovered, handled and investigated in different timescales; there is no real need to continue storing video at the full 25 fps for a month or more, if lower frame rates suffice after the first few days.  FLTM software therefore enables you to progressively reduce the frame rate of your stored footage as time goes by, in accordance with your assessment of residual risks.Let's imagine your system has to deal with robbery, vandalism and fraud, and you have to retain a video record for 30 days.  Robberies are discovered and pursued promptly, so within three days all relevant 25 fps footage has been reviewed and backed up.  Vandalism is dealt with in a week and 6-7 fps footage is adequate.  The timescale for fraud is longer but 1 fps provides the necessary evidential detail.  Normally, for high quality real-rime video @ 4Mbit/s, storage per camera would be about 43.2 GB per day, or 1.3 TB for 30 days.  But with FLTM you only need: 3 days @ 25 fps ≈ 130 GB + 4 days @ 6.25 fps ≈ 90 GB (differential compression reduces data by about 50%)+ 23 days @ 1 fps (I-frames only) ≈ 70 GB  A total of only 290 GB per camera - which enables you to make significant hardware savings without any loss of benefit, utility or security.

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Geutebruck introduces the next generation of ‘omnibrid’, multi-standard operating software
Geutebruck introduces the next generation of ‘omnibrid’, multi-standard operating software

‘Hybrid was yesterday; the future is omnibrid,' is how Geutebruck is heralding the introduction of its new generation of setup and operating software for GeViStore and GeViScope platforms this spring. Not only does this high performance software support analogue, digital and megapixel cameras as well as ONVIF-compliant IP cameras and even16/9 HD-format ones, but it also enables any M-JPEG and H.264 based standard digital compression processes (including specialist video surveillance ones like MPEG4CCTV, H264CCTV) to be used in the same system. This multi-standard capability means that more than one compression standard can be used in one single system and the end-user is no longer tied to one particular process. And, if a camera signal is not available from the source in the optimised MPEG4CCTV format, then the M-JPEG stream can be trans-coded in real time.From Geutebruck's point of view the arrival of ‘omnibrid' software marks another significant step towards achieving the ultimate goal of producing video security systems which record only those images which are really relevant to the user, and which give him the best possible conditions for extracting the valuable information from them. Geutebruck's video sensors and intelligent video analysis software already offer a reliable and proven means of efficiently selecting, managing, and minimising relevant material for onward transmission and/or recording, while its own specialist, CCTV-friendly, standard-compliant compression processes retain fluid motion, and consequently valuable detail, in situations and processes where the vast majority of other H.264 implementations only hesitate and shudder. However, until now the only IP cameras whose video stream could be processed using Geutebruck's video analysis software have been those few with added functionality.‘Omnibrid' software lifts this restriction and opens the door for much greater flexibility in product selection. It also provides more scope for intelligent data management, enables the use of different compression formats for different purposes, and gives system designers much more scope to achieve optimum customisations.

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CCTV software - Expert commentary

Integration of surveillance and video management solutions for safer cities
Integration of surveillance and video management solutions for safer cities

A deep native integration of Bosch cameras with software from ISS proactively catalyses the best in security and surveillance, while providing advanced intelligent video tools. ISS SecurOS provides intelligent enterprise video management solutions with emphasis on providing scalability and flexibility to meet the customer’s needs. Deeply integrating built-in video analytics from Bosch cameras improves operator efficiency and situational awareness to manage complex environments. ISS SecurOS maximises camera performance for license plate recognition, face recognition, and container/train carriages recognition. The cameras meet the performance needs for advanced analytics, ensuring the success of projects and saving time, resources, and cost. The partnership has delivered multi-thousand-camera safe city deployments, industrial analytics solutions, and systems for large-scale transport providers. The usage of roads and parking lots can be managed more effectively by knowing the whereabouts of each vehicle License plate capture The usage of roads and parking lots can be managed more effectively by knowing the whereabouts of each and every vehicle. Operations managers are accountable for efficient logistical flows and effective use of roads and parking lots. Knowing the ins and outs of the transport infrastructure and what’s going on at all times provides the knowledge required to ensure operations are running safely, efficiently and in compliance with the rules and laws. An important part of this comes from monitoring which vehicles are entering an area and ensuring they are allowed to be there. Capturing license plates of every vehicle moving in an area provides knowledge of traffic flows and usage patterns. Such a solution should also allow a customer to easily configure and manage monitoring preferences and permit easy data exchanges with other operational management systems and services to manage an infrastructure and logistics as a whole. Reliable license plate data Robust mechanical design of cameras ensures reliable 24/7 operation for many years even in harsh environments As transportation infrastructures are often operating around the clock, reliable vehicle identification data is required 24/7. This means that the cameras capturing this data should work in all lighting and weather conditions, for both slow- and fast-moving vehicles. Cameras must be built to produce usable images 24/7 in all weather conditions. For quality license plate recognition in both day and night, the cameras make use of supplementary infrared light. A special License Plate Recognition (LPR) mode, developed in collaboration with LPR software, delivers readable license plates even with glaring headlights and with fast moving vehicles. Robust mechanical design of cameras ensures reliable 24/7 operation for many years even in harsh environments. License Plate Capture solution The SecurOSTM AUTO system of ISS, when used with Bosch cameras, provides easy to deploy solutions for all of these requirements. It recognises license plates from many countries, manages and matches white, hot and blacklists and notifies the operator either in the GUI or through a messaging interface to other management systems. Additionally, the system can be used and managed as a standalone or embedded in other management systems on the premises.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) in physical security systems: Trends and opportunities
Artificial Intelligence (AI) in physical security systems: Trends and opportunities

If you’ve been paying attention over the last twelve months, you will have noticed that deep learning techniques and artificial intelligence (AI) are making waves in the physical security market, with manufacturers eagerly adopting these buzzwords at the industry's biggest trade shows. With all the hype, security professionals are curious to know what these terms really mean, and how these technologies can boost real-world security system performance. The growing number of applications of deep learning technology and AI in physical security is a clear indication that these are more than a passing fad. This review of some of our most comprehensive articles on these topics shows that AI is an all-pervasive trend that the physical security industry will do well to embrace quickly. Here, we examine the opportunities that artificial intelligence presents for smart security applications, and look back at how some of the leading security companies are adapting to respond to rapidly-changing expectations: What is deep learning technology? Machine Learning involves collecting large amounts of data related to a problem, training a model using this data and employing this model to process new data. Recently, there have been huge advances in a branch of Machine Learning called Deep Learning. This describes a family of algorithms based on neural networks. These algorithms are able to learn efficiently from example, and subsequently apply this learning to new data. Here, Zvika Ashani explains how deep learning technology can boost video surveillance systems. Relationship between deep learning and artificial intelligence With deep learning, you can show a computer many different images and it will "learn" to distinguish the differences. This is the "training" phase. After the neural network learns about the data, it can then use "inference" to interpret new data based on what it has learned. For example, if it has seen enough cats before, the system will know when a new image is a cat. In effect, the system “learns” by looking at lots of data to achieve artificial intelligence (AI). Larry Anderson explores how new computer hardware - the Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) – is making artificial intelligence accessible to the security industry. Improving surveillance efficiency and accuracy with AI Larry Anderson explains how the latest technologies from Neurala and Motorola will enable the addition of AI to existing products, changing an existing solution from a passive sensor to a device that is “active in its thinking.” The technology is already being added to existing Motorola body-worn-cameras to enable police officers to more efficiently search for objects or persons of interest. In surveillance applications, AI could eliminate the need for humans to do repetitive or boring work, such as look at hours of video footage. Intelligent security systems overcome smart city surveillance challenges AI technology is expected to answer the pressing industry questions of how to use Big Data effectively and make a return on the investment in expensive storage, while maintaining (or even lowering) human capital costs. However, until recently, these expectations have been limited by factors such as a limited ability to learn, and high ongoing costs. Zvika Ashani examines how these challenges are being met and overcome, making artificial intelligence the standard in Smart City surveillance deployments. Combining AI and robotics to enhance security operations With the abilities afforded by AI, robots can navigate any designated area autonomously to keep an eye out for suspicious behaviour or alert first responders to those who may need aid. This also means that fewer law enforcement and/or security personnel will have be pulled from surrounding areas. While drones still require a human operator to chart their flight paths, the evolution of artificial intelligence (AI) is increasing the capabilities of these machines to work autonomously, says Steve Reinharz. Future of artificial intelligence in the security industry Contributors to SourceSecurity.com have been eager to embrace artificial intelligence and its ability to make video analytics more accurate and effective. Manufacturers predicted that deep learning technology could provide unprecedented insight into human behaviour, allowing video systems to more accurately monitor and predict crime. They also noted how cloud-based systems hold an advantage for deep learning video analytics. All in all, manufacturers are hoping that AI will provide scalable solutions across a range of vertical markets. 

Open platform security solutions: Managing customer expectations
Open platform security solutions: Managing customer expectations

It’s not hard to see why more and more locations are requesting security solutions that operate on an open system. Selecting products and platforms that utilise open standards—Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), HTTP, IEEE, RESTful APIs, etc.—provide additional levels of interoperability, scalability and versatility that give organisations the flexibility they want to be proactive with safety and security. Unfortunately, creating the right solution today isn’t quite as simple as reading a product sheet or specification. In the past, end users frequently were forced to pick hardware and software products that were proprietary to each individual manufacturer, meaning pieces of technology often didn’t have the ability to talk and interact with products that didn’t also carry its brand name. In the future, all systems likely will be open in some form and will provide a litany of connectivity options with little-to-no additional development time and resources. But until that day is here, it is important to manage the expectations for stakeholders involved with the project appropriately, knowing that the current security landscape has not yet evolved to the point that all systems are truly open. The current security space can resemble its past almost as much as its future Consumer technology expectations To be fair, the end user’s expectations are often set by what they see happening with consumer technology and not by what is currently available in the security marketplace. There, technological advancements can seem to happen overnight. The apps on your smartphone, for instance, perform almost instantaneous updates, even while you are not actively using it. As convenient as that may be with social media or gaming apps, this also can signal a system that regularly requires fixes and patches, a scenario that would not provide stakeholders with the advanced level of reliability that is demanded for adequate safety with commercial security products, in large part because it will expose locations to numerous liability issues. As a result, the current security space can resemble its past almost as much as its future. Decreased potential for compatibility Make no mistake, there are certainly many products available today that can easily integrate into open platforms, only in a more limited capacity. An IP desk phone, for example, could easily connect to another IP PBX system that can then place basic calls. But as the customer’s demand for additional sophisticated options increases—diagnostics, event triggers, location identification, etc.—the potential for compatibility decreases. When it comes to security, this is due to the fact that two products or systems rarely expose similar functionality using the same technology or language. Take this example, for instance: Manufacturer A sells a product that contains Features X and Y; Manufacturer B offers one with Y and Z. The customer therefore assumes - or may even be sold - a solution where X, Y and Z can all be configured. Pairing the two may give you interoperability with Feature Y fairly easily (if they are implemented the same way), but X and Z will not happen without an additional investment that may be difficult to procure. It benefits all parties to have a common understanding of the project from the very beginning Many manufacturers offer a list of ‘integration partners’ they are compatible with, but may not match the end user’s expectations Meeting end user expectations The devil, however, is in the details, a message that isn’t always effectively communicated to end users. Excusing it all off with the old idiom ‘It’s all Greek to me’ only sets up the project for potentially expensive revisions later on – costs that the integrator often has to eat. Therefore, it benefits all parties to have a common understanding of the project from the very beginning. Given the current state of the consumer marketplace, it is vital for integrators to understand the reality of the products they are considering before seeking out potential solutions. Many manufacturers offer a list of ‘integration partners’ they are compatible with, but these scenarios will carry a predefined scope that may not match the end user’s expectations. Assessing compatibility  To understand the full options available, a copy of a manufacturer’s Software Development Kit (SDK) needs to be requested, which should include detailed information about the possibilities for integrations with their products. A third-party development firm or contractor is fully capable of providing the same level of work as the manufacturer From there, you can compare the devices being considered to see how compatible they are with one another. Finally, it is important to consider the practical implications of financing. If the end user is seeking features that are not currently possible, then additional development will need to be contracted in order to make it happen. Some manufacturers offer design services with developers who are acclimated to their platforms that can help expedite the learning curve. However, with the right SDK and a background in the platforms being used, a third-party development firm or contractor is fully capable of providing the same level of work as the manufacturer. To understand the full options available, a copy of a manufacturer’s Software Development Kit (SDK) needs to be requested Considerations for security system integration To reiterate, any integration, no matter the scope, requires you to consider the following three questions: What does the end user want? What can the products do today? How can you bridge the gap?   It is imperative that both integrators and end users take the time to do the homework required with those three key questions to ensure they are selecting a solution that will not only work tomorrow, but also provides an appropriate layer of protection for people and assets today. Each party involved in an integration project needs to understand what exactly is available from a hardware and software standpoint This also should help mitigate any confusion or frustration that may be experienced by the customer. As much as we all would like to believe that each and every feature available is a viable option that simply isn’t feasible given the realities we face today. There will come a day when the technological advancements enjoyed by consumers around the world provide the type of experience that can be applied to security. Until that time arrives, though, each party involved in the project needs to understand what exactly is currently available from a hardware and software standpoint. The safety of everyone at that location depends on it.

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