CCTV consoles, racks & desks - Expert commentary

Not an afterthought: The significance of security control room aesthetics
Not an afterthought: The significance of security control room aesthetics

Security control rooms should be functional and durable, and their aesthetics should incorporate matching colours that are conducive to a 24/7 operating environment—not too much contrast and easy on the eyes. Another factor driving aesthetics is an enterprise’s desire to create a ‘showpiece’ to demonstrate a commitment to security for shareholders and other stakeholders. “Everyone wants to have a good-looking control room and a cost-effective design,” says Matko Papic, Chief Technology Officer of Evans Consoles. Role of lighting and aesthetics in control rooms “Lighting is a critical factor for operators,” adds Papic. Studies of control rooms have sought to address issues of circadian rhythms (physical, mental, and behavioural changes that a person undergoes over a 24-hour cycle, based on responses to light) and the impact of changing light colours throughout the day. Flexibility is key. Properly adjusted light can increase alertness at 2 a.m.; controlling the colour, tone and intensity of light can increase productivity any time of day. Evans Controls has experts who can do a lighting study of a room as part of construction services and consulting. Evans Controls has experts who can do a lighting study of a room as part of construction services and consulting Aesthetics, depending on the control room, can be very important, agrees Randy Smith, President of Winsted. His company accommodates aesthetics by using a variety of matching laminates, solid (Corian-type) surfaces, and sometimes real wood. They can put in a console with matching work surfaces, a credenza or other furnishings, or can even match existing décor in a facility. Customised tailored furnishing Security control rooms, often operating in glass enclosures, are often used to “make a statement” about the security of a facility, says Smith. Companies want the control rooms to be up-to-date, and have “cool designs.” Sometimes they want to add a company logo to a work surface or side panels, or they want to employ corporate colours in the design. Winsted can customise its offerings to meet any such requirements, says Smith. In too many instances, the control room is an afterthought: They just install furniture that fits with the monitors. How the furnishings are tailored to the operator is often not considered, says Papic. He offers several other considerations: Will the furniture last the lifetime of the control room? How adaptable is a design to possible future changes, whether larger monitors, managing cables, or ability to reconfigure the console? Furniture should not be viewed as a transactional item; there are more issues to address beyond physically housing the equipment, says Papic. Read part 5 of our Control Rooms series here

Mobile communications make the public an additional sensor on the field
Mobile communications make the public an additional sensor on the field

Today, almost every employee carries with them a smart device that can send messages, capture, and record images and increasingly live-stream video and audio, all appended with accurate location and time stamping data. Provide a way for staff to easily feed data from these devices directly to the control room to report an incident and you have created a new and extremely powerful ‘sensor’, capable of providing accurate, verified, real-time multi-media incident information. You need only to watch the television when a major incident is being reported. The images are often from a witness at the scene who recorded it on their device. It is madness that it has until now been easier for people to share information around the world via Facebook and YouTube etc, in a matter of minutes, than it is to transmit it to those that need to coordinate the response. The public as an additional security and safety sensor In the UK, a marketing campaign designed by government, police and the rail industry is currently running. Aiming to help build a more vigilant network on railways across the country and raise awareness of the vital role the public can play in keeping themselves and others safe, the ‘See It. Say It. Sorted’ campaign urges train passengers and station visitors to report any unusual items by speaking to a member of rail staff, sending a text, or calling a dedicated telephone number. Essentially, the campaign is asking the public to be an additional safety and security sensor. However, with the help of the latest mobile app technology, it is possible to take things to a whole new level and this is being demonstrated by a large transport network in the US. This organisation recognised that the ideal place to begin its campaign of connecting smart devices to the control room as an additional sensor, was by engaging its 10,000 employees (incidentally, this is approximately twice the number of surveillance cameras it has). These employees have been encouraged to install a dedicated app on their mobile devices that enables them to transmit important information directly to the control room, as well as a panic button for their own safety. This data can be a combination of images, text, audio, video and even live-streaming, to not only make the control room aware of the situation but give them eyes and ears on the ground. For the control room operator, the insights being fed to them from this ‘sensor’ have arguably more value than any other as they provide pinpoint accurate and relevant information Combatting control room information overload For the control room operator, the insights being fed to them from this ‘sensor’ have arguably more value than any other as they provide pinpoint accurate and relevant information. For example, if an alert comes in about a fire on platform 3, the operator doesn’t necessarily require any of the information from the other sensors, nor does he need to verify it’s not a false alarm. He knows that the information received has been ‘verified’ in-person (it is also time and location stamped) and that there is an employee located in the vicinity of the incident, who they can now directly communicate with for a real-time update and to co-ordinate the appropriate response. Compare this to a 24/7 video stream from 5000 cameras. It is in stark contrast to the typical issue of sensors creating information overload. The employee only captures and transmits the relevant information, so in essence, the filtering of information is being done at source, by a human sensor that can see, hear, and understand what is happening in context. So, if an intruder is climbing over a fence you no longer need to rely on the alert from the perimeter alarm and the feed from the nearest camera, you simply send a patrol to the location based on what the person is telling you. Furthermore, if the control room is operating a Situation Management/PSIM system it will trigger the opening of a new incident, so when the operator receives the information they are also presented with clear guidance and support regarding how to best manage and respond to that particular situation. Transport networks are using staff and the public as additional safety and security sensors Application of roaming smart sensors To be clear, this is not to suggest that we no longer need these vitally important sensors, because we do. However, one major reason that we have so many sensors is because we cannot have people stationed everywhere. So, in the case of the US transit company, it has been able to add a further 10,000 roaming smart sensors. This can be applied to other industries such as airports, ports, warehouse operations, stadiums, and arenas etc. Now, imagine the potential of widening the scope to include the public, to truly incorporate crowdsourcing in to the day-to-day security function. For example, in May, it was reported that West Midlands Police in the UK would be piloting an initiative that is asking citizens to upload content relating to offences being committed. Leveraging existing hardware infrastructure Typically, when introducing any form of new security sensor or system, it is expected to be an expensive process. However, the hardware infrastructure is already in place as most people are already in possession of a smart device, either through work or personally. What’s more, there is typically an eager appetite to be a good citizen or employee, just so long as it isn’t too much of an inconvenience. Innovations in smart mobile devices has moved at such a pace that whilst many security professionals debate if and how to roll-out body-worn-cameras, members of the public are live-streaming from their full HD and even 4K ready phones. The technology to make every employee a smart sensor has been around for some time and keeps getting better and better, and it is in the pockets of most people around the world. What is different now is the potential to harness it and efficiently bring it in to the security process. All organisations need to do is know how to switch it on and leverage it.

Technology evolution leads to changes in security control room furniture
Technology evolution leads to changes in security control room furniture

Technology is changing the look and function of today’s security control rooms. Old-school CRT (cathode-ray tube) monitors are giving way to the thinner, flat screen monitors in the control room environment, but the transition is gradual. Randy Smith of Winsted still sees many control rooms that need to make the conversion, which is a boon to his company’s business. Furniture today is designed differently to accommodate the thinner monitors, often with larger screens. Need for integrated rack systems With the increase of IP-based systems comes the need for integrated rack systems that include advanced functionality such as cable management, adds Jim Coleman, National Sales Manager, AFC Industries. Server rooms are environmentally controlled by cooling systems and power systems monitored on the IP network. Low-profile flat screens allow centres to utilise space vertically, thus creating a smaller footprint for the consoles. Additionally, with IP-based systems, workstations will have a smaller footprint because there is less cumbersome equipment. In most cases the servers are stored in a secured, climate controlled environment to eliminate overheating of the servers and maintain their security, says Coleman. This environment also helps with cable and power management. AFC builds technical furniture racks that adhere to the precise needs of computer network server room operators. The company designs and fabricates LAN workbenches with versatile functionalities, and server room workstation racks that are scalable. There is a complete line of IT workbenches, IT computer racks and computer server rack mounts with flexible mounting options. In most cases the servers are stored in a secured, climate controlled environment to eliminate overheating of the servers and maintain their security Flexible control room designs Matko Papic, Chief Technology Officer of Evans Consoles, says the transition from bulky CRT equipment to flat-screen (lower profile) monitors was a major disruption in control room design; it changed the whole dynamic. Another evolution is the use of IP video streaming, which allows more flexibility in manipulation of audio-video content, and requires more flexible control room designs. Another shift, driven by larger, higher-definition monitors, is a shift to fewer monitors that display more information. Instead of a smaller monitor for each information stream, larger monitors now consolidate that information into “dashboard” displays. Looking ahead, control rooms will need to be more flexible, both in the initial design and the ability to adapt to changing technology, says Papic. Legacy customers who are currently using PCs may be moving to more remote applications. Sit-stand equipment will continue to be increasingly prevalent. “There will be more emphasis on flexibility, technology integration, and the ability to change over the life of the system,” says Papic. Consolidation of multiple operations into a single system A trend in security is consolidation of multiple physical operations into a single system, says Papic. As a result, more customers are taking more interest in alarm management and situational awareness. How is the technology being used in terms of alarm triggers? How can the systems react rapidly and provide information to a larger audience in the control room? These questions impact how control rooms are designed, and Evans Consoles can adapt lessons learned from other markets to these trends in the security arena. Greater use of technology is inevitable, says Coleman of AFC Industries. “It is virtually impossible for humans to monitor all security data at the street level in our cities,” he says. “As computers become more powerful and their programs more all-encompassing, we will see a greater shift to robotic and technology uses that will provide enhanced monitoring capabilities and safety Read our Control Rooms series here

Latest GEUTEBRUCK GmbH news

Security & Safety Things partners with Link Analytix, SAIMOS and CVEDIA to provide video analytics solutions for retailers
Security & Safety Things partners with Link Analytix, SAIMOS and CVEDIA to provide video analytics solutions for retailers

Security & Safety Things GmbH (S&ST), together with its partners, is offering packages of smart security cameras and video analytic solutions designed to provide retailers with immediate solutions to practical challenges from the COVID-19 pandemic. AI tech on cameras in retail stores In an effort to assist retailers operating their shops in compliance with COVID-19 regulations, these packages will include test cameras running the S&ST operating system. Integrators and end-customers can choose and deploy AI applications on these cameras to address operational challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic. These apps are offered by S&ST’s development partners. Uses for applications include: Occupancy management Face mask detection Social distancing monitoring Real-time occupancy and face mask detection solutions A face mask detection app, offered by Geutebrück, enables efficient monitoring of people Security & Safety Things’ developer partners include Link Analytix, which is offering Retail Flux, a real-time occupancy solution designed to limit risk of infection for both shoppers and employees. SAIMOS has developed the SAIMOS Counting app, which can be used to monitor multiple entrances and exits to track occupancy in real-time and manage visitor access through automated displays at entry points. A face mask detection app, offered by Geutebrück, enables efficient monitoring of people to ensure compliance with prescribed hygiene concepts. This solution is able to recognise if an individual is wearing a protective mask and instantly notifies unprotected persons to onsite staff or remote operators via a connected Video Management System. SAIMOS also offers a feature for face mask detection in their counting app. Talos Social Distancing app CVEDIA’s Talos Social Distancing app features a foot traffic algorithm designed to detect and analyse at-risk areas for physical distancing in corporate or public spaces. This app detects people and the distances between them, while providing additional visual analytics that allow companies to improve current COVID-19 practices.

Geutebrück brings contactless real-time face-mask detection, body temperature video security solution
Geutebrück brings contactless real-time face-mask detection, body temperature video security solution

Body temperature measurement, detection of face masks and the counting of visitor flows - Geutebrück has expanded its portfolio to enable the retail trade, public authorities and operators of public transport and industry to adjust their protective measures to the current situation. Without having to resort to biometric data, the intelligent and highly available video security systems process images in real time. This way, both customers and personnel are being protected, and compliance with official regulations or prescribed hygiene measures is being controlled and documented. Contactless measurement of body temperature When measuring body temperature people are automatically screened. Fields of application are where many people come together, e.g. in companies, manufacturing plants, train stations, at airports, in public or private institutions. The automated face mask detection verifies compliance with such precautions and can - when connected to an access control system - allow or block entry to a building. Suitable for any facility with public access. Visitor management for restricting number of visitors Visitor counting and routing is of particular interest to shop owners, who need to ensure that the number of customers in their premises is kept below the maximum. As with all Geutebrück solutions, the most recent developments are GDPR-compliant and protect the privacy and personal rights of all those involved. "Our clients are facing unknown challenges in the current situation. Our solutions can help in many fields to overcome such challenges by means of visualisation and automatisation - yet without reaching capacity limits", says Christine Heger-Essig, Chief Technology Officer.

Image-based security solutions expert Geutebrück to participate in Intersec Dubai 2020
Image-based security solutions expert Geutebrück to participate in Intersec Dubai 2020

From 19 to 21 January 2020, Geutebrück will take part in the INTERSEC in Dubai. Geutebrück is an international expert for image-based security solutions Made in Germany, offering high-performance software and hardware. It can be versatilely used to guarantee security, maintain transparency and optimise processes, always in accordance with the stringent rules of the European Directive on the Protection of Personal Data (DS-GVO). Geutebrück will be introducing their partner Comtegra, with whom they share their stand with. Comtegra is a rising Technology Distribution Company with four core areas of business i.e. Digital Infrastructure, Cybersecurity, IoT and Physical Security and SaaS Applications. They carry years of Physical Security solutions experience, and are excited to launch and extend the benefits of Geutebrück products and solutions to partners and customers across the Middle East region. In the Trade Centre Arena, SA-N19, the solutions for facial recognition and object recognition will be presented. The experts from Germany are available for their guests at any time.