Telemetry transmitters and controllers - Expert commentary

Integrated security systems for medium and large-sized offices
Integrated security systems for medium and large-sized offices

If you’re responsible for a medium or large-sized office, it’s more important than ever that you have access to a means of ensuring people’s safety, managing risks and fraud, and protecting property. Any security system that you employ must therefore meet the most demanding commercial requirements of today’s offices, and tomorrow’s. This means thinking beyond a basic intrusion system and specifying a comprehensive solution that integrates smart features like access control, video management and intelligent video analytics. Because only then will you have security you can trust, and detection you can depend on. Reliable entry management Access control systems have been developed that guarantee reliable entry management for indoors and outdoors Access control is becoming increasingly important for ensuring the security of office buildings, but as the modern workplace evolves you’re unlikely to find a one-size-fits-all solution. Today, it’s commonplace to control entry to individual rooms or restricted areas and cater to more flexible working hours that extend beyond 9 to 5, so a modern and reliable access control system that exceeds the limitations of standard mechanical locks is indispensable. Access control systems have been developed that guarantee reliable entry management for indoors and outdoors. They use state-of-the-art readers and controllers to restrict access to certain areas, ensuring only authorised individuals can get in. With video cameras located within close proximity you can then monitor and record any unauthorised access attempts. The system can also undertake a people-count to ensure only one person has entered using a single pass. Scalable hardware components As previously mentioned, there is no one-size-fits-all system, but thanks to the scalability of the hardware components, systems can adapt to changing security requirements. For example, you can install Bosch’s Access Professional Edition (APE) software for small to medium-sized offices, then switch to the more comprehensive Access Engine (ACE) of the Building Integration System (BIS) when your security requirements grow. And, because the hardware stays the same, any adaptations are simple. APE’s ‘permanent open’ functionality allows employees and guests to enter designated areas easily and conveniently The APE software administers up to 512 readers, 10,000 cardholders and 128 cameras, making it suitable for small to medium-sized buildings. With functions like badge enrollment, entrance control monitoring and alarm management with video verification it provides a high level of security and ensures only authorised employees and visitors are able to enter certain rooms and areas. Of course, there will always be situations when, for convenience, you need certain doors to be permanently open, such as events and open days. APE’s ‘permanent open’ functionality allows employees and guests to enter designated areas easily and conveniently. Growing security needs You switch to the Bosch Building Integration System (BIS), without having to switch hardware (it stays the same, remember?). This is a software solution that manages subsystems like access control, video surveillance, fire alarm, public address or intrusion systems, all on a single platform. It is designed for offices with multiple sites and for large companies with a global presence. Bosch Building Integration System (BIS) manages subsystems like access control, video surveillance, fire alarm, public address or intrusion systems, all on a single platform The BIS Access Engine (ACE) administers up to 10,000 readers and 80 concurrent workplace clients per server, and 200,000 cardholders per AMC. An additional benefit to security officers is the ability to oversee cardholders and authorisations through the central cardholder management functionality and monitor all access events and alarms from every connected site. For consistency, multi-site cardholder information and access authorisations can be created on a central server and replicated across all connected site servers, which means the cardholder information is always up to date and available in every location. Intrusion alarm systems Bosch B Series and G Series intrusion control panels can also send personal notifications via text or email Securing all perimeter doors is vital when protecting employees, visitors and intellectual property. Doors are opened and closed countless times during business hours, and when intentionally left open, your office is vulnerable to theft, and the safety of your employees is compromised. For this reason, intrusion control panels have been developed with advanced features to ensure all perimeter doors are properly closed, even when the system is not armed. If a door remains open for a period of time (you can specify anything from one second to 60 minutes), the system can be programmed to automatically take action. For example, it can activate an audible alert at the keypad to give employees time to close the door. Then, if it is still not closed, it will send a report to a monitoring center or a text directly to the office manager, and when integrated with video it can even send an image of the incident to a mobile device. Customised intrusion systems What about people who need to access your building outside of working hours, like cleaning crews? Your intruder system allows you to customise the way it operates with a press of a button or swipe of a card. This level of control enables you to disarm specific areas, bypass points and unlock doors for cleaning crews or after-hours staff, whilst keeping server rooms, stock rooms and executive offices safe and secure. Bosch B Series and G Series intrusion control panels can also send personal notifications via text or email. You can program the panel to send you opening, closing, and other event alerts, which means you don’t have to be on-site to keep track of movements in and around your facility. Video management system A video management system will add a next level of security to your access control system Every office building has different video security requirements depending on the location, size and nature of the business. Some offices may only need basic functions such as recording and playback, whereas others may need full alarm functionalities and access to different sites. A video management system will add a next level of security to your access control system. For example, the video system can provide seamless management of digital video, audio and data across IP networks for small to large office buildings. It is fully integrated and can be scaled according to your specific requirements. The entry-level BVMS Viewer is suitable for small offices that need to access live and archived video from their recording solutions. With forensic search it enables you to access a huge recording database and scan quickly for a specific security event. For larger offices, embellished security functions for the BVMS Professional version can manage up to 2,000 cameras and offers full alarm and event management Full alarm and event management For larger offices, embellished security functions for the BVMS Professional version can manage up to 2,000 cameras and offers full alarm and event management. It’s also resilient enough to remain operative should both Management and Recording Servers fail. Large multi-national companies often need access to video surveillance systems at numerous sites, which is why BVMS Professional allows you to access live and archived video from over 10,000 sites across multiple time zones from a single BVMS server. When integrated with the BVMS Enterprise version multiple BVMS Professional systems can be connected so every office in the network can be viewed from one security center, which provides the opportunity to monitor up to 200,000 cameras, regardless of their location. Essential Video Analytics Video analytics acts as the brain of your security system, using metadata to add sense and structure to any video footage you capture If your strategy is to significantly improve levels of security, video analytics is an essential part of the plan. It acts as the brain of your security system, using metadata to add sense and structure to any video footage you capture. In effect, each video camera in your network becomes smart to the degree that it can understand and interpret what it is seeing. You simply set certain alarm rules, such as when someone approaches a perimeter fence, and video analytics alerts security personnel the moment a rule is breached. Smart analytics have been developed in two formats. Essential Video Analytics is ideal for small and medium-sized commercial buildings and can be used for advanced intrusion detection, such as loitering alarms, and identifying a person or object entering a pre-defined field. It also enables you to instantly retrieve the right footage from hours of stored video, so you can deal with potential threats the moment they happen. Essential Video Analytics also goes beyond security to help you enforce health and safety regulations such as enforcing no parking zones, detecting blocked emergency exits or ensuring no one enters or leaves a building via an emergency exit; all measures that can increase the safety of employees and visitors inside the building. Intelligent Video Analytics Intelligent Video Analytics have the unique capability of analysing video content over large distances Intelligent Video Analytics have the unique capability of analysing video content over large distances, which makes it ideally suited to more expansive office grounds or securing a perimeter fence. It can also differentiate between genuine security events and known false triggers such as snow, rain, hail and moving tree branches that can make video data far more difficult to interpret. The final piece in your security jigsaw is an intelligent camera. The latest range of Bosch ’i’ cameras have the image quality, data security measures, and bitrate reduction of <80%. And, video analytics is standard. Be prepared for what can’t be predicted. Although no-one can fully predict what kind of security-related event is around the corner, experience and expertise will help make sure you’re always fully prepared.

Why live video streaming is critical for safer and smarter cities
Why live video streaming is critical for safer and smarter cities

The term “smart city” gets thrown around a lot nowadays, but as different technologies that strive to be defined in this way are adopted by different countries globally, the meaning of this phrase gets lost in translation. The simplest way to define a “smart city” is that it is an urban area that uses different types of data collecting sensors to manage assets and resources efficiently. One of the most obvious types of “data collecting sensor” is the video camera, whether that camera is part of a city’s existing CCTV infrastructure, a camera in a shopping centre or even a police car’s dash camera. The information gathered by video cameras can be used with two purposes in mind, firstly: making people’s lives more efficient, for example by managing traffic, and secondly (and arguably more importantly): making people’s lives safer. Live streaming video all the time, everywhere In the smart and safe city, traditional record-only video cameras are of limited use. Yes, they can be used to collect video which can be used for evidence after a crime has taken place, but there is no way that this technology could help divert cars away from an accident to avoid traffic building up, or prevent a crime from taking place in the first place. However, streaming live video from a camera that isn’t connected to an infrastructure via costly fibre optic cabling has proven challenging for security professionals, law enforcement and city planners alike. This is because it isn’t viable to transmit video reliably over cellular networks, in contrast to simply receiving it. Video transmission challenges Transmitting video normally results in freezing and buffering issues which can hinder efforts to fight crime and enable flow within a city, as these services require real-time, zero latency video without delays. Therefore, special technology is required that copes with poor and varying bandwidths to allow a real-time view of any scene where cameras are present to support immediate decision making and smart city processes. The information gatheredby video cameras can beused to make people’s lives more efficient, and to make people’s lives safer There are many approaches to transmitting video over cellular. We’ve developed a specialist codec (encoding and decoding algorithm) that can provide secure and reliable video over ultra-low bandwidths and can therefore cope when networks become constrained. Another technique, which is particularly useful if streaming video from police body worn cameras or dash cams that move around, is to create a local wireless “bubble” at the scene, using Wi-Fi or mesh radio systems to provide local high-bandwidth communications that can communicate with a central location via cellular or even satellite communications. Enhanced city surveillance Live video streaming within the smart and safe city’s infrastructure means that video’s capabilities can go beyond simple evidence recording and evolve into a tool that allows operations teams to monitor and remediate against incidents as they are happening. This can be taken one step further with the deployment of facial recognition via live streaming video. Facial recognition technology can be added on to any video surveillance camera that is recording at a high enough quality to identify faces. The technology works by capturing video, streaming the live video back to a control centre and matching faces against any watch lists that the control centre owns. Importantly, the data of people who aren’t on watch lists is not stored by the technology. Identifying known criminals This technology can work to make the city safer in a number of ways. For example, facial recognition could spot a known drug dealer in a city centre where they weren’t supposed to be, or facial recognition could identify if a group of known terror suspects were visiting the same location at the same time, and this would send an alert to the police. Facial recognition technology captures and streams live back to a control centre, matching faces against any watch lists that the control centre owns In an ideal world where the police had an automated, electronic workflow, the police officer nearest to the location of the incident would be identified by GPS and would be told by the control room where to go and what to do. Most police forces aren’t quite at this technological level yet, and would probably rely on communicating via radio in order to send the nearest response team to the scene. As well as this, shopping centres could create a database from analogue records of known shoplifters to identify criminals as soon as they entered the building. This would be even more effective if run co-operatively between all shopping centres and local businesses in an area, and would not only catch any known shoplifters acting suspiciously, but would act as a deterrent from shoplifting in the first place. Live streaming for police As mentioned above, live streaming video from CCTV cameras can help the police fight crime more proactively rather than reactively. This can be enhanced even further if combined with live streaming video from police car dash cams and police body worn cameras. If video was streamed from all of these sources to a central HQ, such as a police operations centre, the force would be able to have full situational awareness throughout an incident. This would mean that, if need be, officers could be advised on the best course of action, and additional police or other emergency services could be deployed instantly if needed. Incorporated with facial recognition, this would also mean that police could instantly identify if they were dealing with known criminals or terrorists. Whilst they would still have to confirm the identity of the person with questioning or by checking their identification, this is still more streamlined than describing what a person looks like over a radio and then ops trying to manually identify if the person is on a watch list. The smart, safe city is possible today – for one, if live video streaming capabilities are deployed they can enable new levels of flow in the city. With the addition of facial recognition, cities will be safer than ever before and law enforcement and security teams will be able to proactively stop crime before it happens by deterring criminal activity from taking place at all.

Drone terror: How to protect facilities and people
Drone terror: How to protect facilities and people

The use of drones has increased dramatically in the last few years. Indeed, by 2021, the FAA says the number of small hobbyist drones in the U.S. will triple to about 3.55 million. With that growth, drone capabilities have increased while costs have decreased. For example, the DJI Phantom 4 can deliver a 2-pound payload to a target with 1.5m accuracy from 20 miles away for the less than $1000.00. This is an unprecedented capability accessible to anyone. This new technology has created an entirely new security risk for businesses and governments. Drone security risks Already, rogue groups such as ISIS have used low cost drones to carry explosives in targeted attacks. Using this same method, targeting high profile locations within our borders to create terror and panic is very possible. Security professionals and technologists are working furiously to address the gaps in drone defence. Currently, the most common technologies in use for drone detection are video, acoustic sensors, radio, and air surveillance radar. Each of these has advantages, but they also have flaws that make it difficult to detect drones in all conditions. Both optical and thermal cameras, as well as acoustic sensors, do not operate in severe weather such as fog and snow. And while radio and air surveillance radar cover a wide area of detection, they suffer from high installation costs and limiting technical challenges, such as being unable to detect low flying drones on autopilot. Compact Surveillance Radar (CSR) Compact Surveillance Radar (CSR) is a security technology addressing the problems with other types of detection. CSR, like traditional radar, has the benefit of being able to detect and track foreign objects in all weather conditions, but at a fraction of the size and cost. The compact size allows the radar to be mounted on existing structures or even trees, providing extensive perimeter defence almost anywhere that you can imagine. CSR can also filter out clutter such as birds by using an advanced algorithm reducing the number of false alarms. While the use of CSR and the other detection technologies are legal in the US and in most locations throughout the world, the response mechanisms are generally not. Current regulations in the US prohibit the use of jamming or GPS spoofing in all cases except for a few federal agencies Regulations limiting drones Current regulations in the US prohibit the use of jamming or GPS spoofing in all cases except for a few federal agencies. This makes it difficult to stop the damage that drones can cause. The FAA has put into place new regulations that limit some uses of drones. However, in most cases it is still illegal for even state or local governments to stop or interfere with drones other than to locate the operator and have them land the drone. In 2016 the first law to neutralise a drone in the United States was passed in Utah to respond to drones in wildfire areas because of their interference with airborne firefighting. This law may very well provide a model for other states dealing with drones in situations where people’s lives are being put at risk by drones. At the federal level, much effort is being put into evaluating the regulations and technology surrounding the misuse of drones. In the 2016 reauthorisation bill for the FAA, Section 2135 included a pilot program for the investigation of methods to mitigate the threat of unmanned aircraft around airports and other critical infrastructure. There are many federal agencies that are evaluating the use of a variety of technologies to respond to this threat. Both optical and thermal cameras, as well as acoustic sensors, do not operate in severe weather such as fog and snow   Effective countermeasure technologies The most effective countermeasure for drones is jamming, currently off-limits to the private sector. This includes stadiums, convention centres, and other large gathering areas. A number of companies are developing new response technologies that do not require the use of jammers or hacking. Several companies have developed net guns that shoot a net at an approaching drone. These are only effective at less than 100m and frequently miss the target, especially when the drone is approaching at high speed. Several other companies have taken this method a step further, with drones that capture other drones. Once a radar detects a drone, another defence drone is launched and flies to the point of detection. Then, using video analytics it homes in on the drone and fires a net to disable the drone and take it to a safe location. While this drone capturing technique is still in its infancy, it shows a great deal of promise and will not be restricted in the same fashion as jamming. However, even this solution is difficult under current regulations, as all commercial drones in the US must be under direct control of a human operator within their line of sight. This effectively means that a drone operator is required to be on-site at all times to protect a facility, event, or persons. One thing is for certain, technology will continue to adapt and security companies will continue to invent new methods to protect their facilities and the people they are sworn to protect.

Latest Honeywell news

Honeywell and IDEMIA announce a strategic alliance to develop an intelligent and seamless building ecosystem
Honeywell and IDEMIA announce a strategic alliance to develop an intelligent and seamless building ecosystem

Honeywell, a global provider of connected buildings, and IDEMIA, a global provider of Augmented Identity, announced a strategic alliance to create and cultivate an intelligent building ecosystem that provides a more seamless and enhanced experience for operators and occupants alike. The alliance will integrate Honeywell’s security and building management systems with IDEMIA’s biometric-based access control systems to create frictionless, safer and more efficient buildings. The Honeywell and IDEMIA alliance is intended to design solutions that will allow occupants to easily and securely have contactless engagement with a building - from vehicle recognition at the car park and automatic elevator calls to biometric-based access and personalised conference room settings. With a focus on security and data privacy, these next-generation solutions will provide occupants with a safer, more efficient and more enjoyable experience that will help building owners attract tenants. Complex security requirements “We recognise that our customers need to deliver business outcomes like managing complex security requirements and providing healthier, more productive environments,” said Manish Sharma, Vice President, Chief Technology and Chief Product Officer for Honeywell Building Technologies. We will create an intelligent building ecosystem that better addresses our customers’ key challenges" “By working with IDEMIA, we will create an intelligent building ecosystem that better addresses our customers’ key challenges and drives their desired outcomes. Whether it’s a commercial office building, a hospital or an airport, we have the ability to change the way people experience and interact with buildings for the better.” Safety and security systems “We look forward to expanding our long-standing relationship with Honeywell to bring greater value to our customers with more integrated solutions that make for a more seamless building experience,” said Matt Cole, CEO, Secure Enterprise Transactions Division, IDEMIA. “The ability for our technology to easily integrate with Honeywell safety and security systems will provide building owners and operators more insight and control into creating more efficient buildings, while putting the occupant experience first.” Facial recognition terminal IDEMIA’s field-proven AI-based products and solutions - like MorphoWaveTM, a contactless fingerprint device that scans four fingerprints in less than one second; VisionPass, the most advanced facial recognition terminal; or Augmented Vision, a biometric video analytics platform - integrate with Honeywell security and building management systems. Honeywell’s systems include Pro-Watch Integrated Security Suite, MAXPRO Cloud and Enterprise Buildings Integrator. Honeywell and IDEMIA will work together to deliver powerful integrations through aligned product creation Honeywell and IDEMIA will work together to deliver more powerful integrations through aligned product creation and joint product roadmaps. The integrated offerings will allow building operators to respond rapidly and effectively to alarms or incidents by providing an incident workflow package that allows Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) to be configured, reducing compliance exceptions, security risks and response times. Personal protection equipment IDEMIA products also support Honeywell’s Healthy Buildings solutions that help building owners improve building environments, operate more cleanly and safely and encourage sustained compliance with changing building standards, safety guidelines, government-issued regulations and a company's risk management policies. Honeywell's Healthy Buildings solutions provide a holistic view of a building's health based on key factors such as indoor air quality, occupant flow, personal protection equipment (PPE) analytics, contactless access, thermal screening, social distancing and sanitation efficacy.

ASSA ABLOY integrates Aperio wireless lock technology with Connect ONE platform from Connected Technologies
ASSA ABLOY integrates Aperio wireless lock technology with Connect ONE platform from Connected Technologies

ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions completed the integration of their Aperio® wireless lock technology with the Connect ONE® cloud-hosted management platform from Connected Technologies, Monument, Colo. Connect ONE manages all connected customer devices, including wireless and hardwired locks, access control, intrusion, video surveillance, critical environmental monitoring and energy management from a single interface. “We’re excited to present this integration with industry leading ASSA ABLOY Aperio wireless devices to Connect ONE dealers,” said Mike Simon, Managing Partner of Connected Technologies. Global wireless platform “Now, dealers can easily expand their services to more doors and offer new protection possibilities that save installation time and money. In addition, the Aperio/Connect ONE integration works with popular Bosch, DMP, ELK and Honeywell Vista panels so they can be up and running with new specs quickly.” The Aperio integration offers Connect ONE customers an easy way to connect additional wireless locks to new and existing installations. Aperio is a global wireless platform that works with extensive locking hardware options from ASSA ABLOY Group brands, offering the flexibility to address a variety of applications throughout any facility. The platform uses wireless communication (IEEE 802.15.4) between the lock and an Aperio hub to provide real-time communication to the access control system, simplifying installation and reducing costs. Encrypted wireless connection The integration also allows for a mapped hardwired relay output to initiate an auxiliary control upon access Aperio wireless locks map directly to the intrusion areas for an immediate armed status review to deny access when armed and can also disarm intrusion with proper authority upon granted access at the lock. Since the wireless locks are highly integrated with the control panel, user permissions are applied exactly the same for hardwired readers, allowing for a mix of wireless and hardwired reader/locks without additional set-up complexity. The integration also allows for a mapped hardwired relay output to initiate an auxiliary control upon access and a relay output to control an external door opener. Aperio locks use an encrypted wireless connection to an Aperio IP hub; each hub can communicate to a maximum of 64 locks. Highly flexible solution “Connect ONE offers a simple, scalable solution that complements the Aperio offering perfectly,” stated Mark Duato, Executive Vice President, Aftermarket, ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions Americas. “This integration will offer dealers and end-users a highly flexible solution for comprehensive access management.” Connect One’s ScanPass® Mobile Credential smartphone control is also supported with the integration, eliminating the need for card or fob credentials. Dealers can contact ASSA ABLOY to become certified to offer Aperio locks, which come in a variety of form factors and can be purchased through ASSA ABLOY Authorised Channel Partners.

Sydney’s Gateway Building integrates Boon Edam Turnstiles with IDEMIA’s MorphoWave touchless scanners and Honeywell access control
Sydney’s Gateway Building integrates Boon Edam Turnstiles with IDEMIA’s MorphoWave touchless scanners and Honeywell access control

Boon Edam Inc., a globally renowned company in security entrances and architectural revolving doors, has announced that Dexus Wholesale Property Fund has upgraded the Gateway Building in Sydney’s Circular Quay to feature entry security measures to protect employees, visitors and valuable data. The ideal solution was found by integrating Boon Edam Speedlane Swing optical turnstiles, IDEMIA’s MorphoWave touchless fingerprint scanners, Schindler’s elevator dispatch and Honeywell’s access control technology. Integration with MorphoWave touchless reader MorphoWave scans and verifies four fingerprints through a simple hand wave gesture Gateway’s access solution allows authorised and registered tenants to simply wave their hand in the MorphoWave touchless fingerprint scanner reader to enter the secure area through the turnstiles. Guests can sign in and register their finger pattern to become authorised to enter. MorphoWave scans and verifies four fingerprints through a simple hand wave gesture, during which the sensor takes several 3D photos of the fingerprints to extract biometric data and compare with the authorised fingerprints stored in the device. If they match, the user is granted access. This process all happens in less than one second. Featuring Schindler’s PORT Technology Each MorphoWave reader is connected to Schindler’s PORT Technology, which then receives the user’s credential data and conducts a cross-check with the building’s access control database. If the user is valid, a command is sent to the Boon Edam Lifeline Speedlane Swing to open its barriers. This interaction is surprisingly quick, with limited latency. “Tenants have a duty of care to protect their employees and visitors as well as valuable data and intellectual property, and they need the cooperation and support of a responsible and innovative building manager such as Dexus to manage secure entry into the building,” said Michael Fisher, Managing Director, Boon Edam Australia. Seamless access control integration A major part of the solution involves elevator destination control, whereby a user’s credentials are automatically assigned an elevator as they are verified and allowed access through the turnstile. This seamless integration was facilitated by an existing global partnership between Boon Edam and Schindler. The partnership arranged for Schindler’s PORT 4 mini technology to be embedded into the Speedlane Swing optical turnstiles at the manufacturing stage in the Boon Edam factory. Using an advanced algorithm and the integrated Schindler PORT 4 mini elevator destination control for visual and audio feedback, an elevator is automatically assigned, at the same time the turnstile is opening, allowing for optimum efficiency. The security is controlled by Honeywell’s access control system, integrated with Schindler’s PORT Technology. Honeywell access control system Honeywell has managed the security and building management systems for the Gateway building since 1990 Honeywell has been managing the security and building management systems for the Gateway building since it was first opened in 1990. Honeywell Asia-Pacific Solution Architect Leader Rhys Crabb said “Early engagement at all stages and a commitment to a collaborative approach enabled Dexus to select the best available technologies. Dexus placed customer outcomes first and foremost in the project brief, ensuring the delivery of a product that provided tenants and visitors with a premium, modern and secure user experience that is flexible and easy to use.” Boon Edam optical turnstiles Mr. Stephen Hodge, Senior Project Manager, Dexus, said “With so many stakeholders, and a strong need for reliability and quality, it was important that everyone knew the goals of the project and worked well together. I’m pleased to say that it was like a perfect jigsaw and everything came together smoothly." Stephen adds, “What was important to Dexus is that we were pushing the boundaries to create better experiences, but we’re only doing so with proven products. Boon Edam’s optical turnstiles have been installed globally and locally, and this gave us added confidence that they were the right product for this forward-looking project.” Enhanced building security “Another significant help with this project was that the companies involved built a prototype, located at Schindler’s Head Office based in Sydney, so that the Dexus management and technical teams could test the solution well in advance of implementing it at Gateway,” Hodge continued. He further stated, “It gave us peace of mind that we’d selected the right suppliers. We have tenants in Gateway who requested ground floor security, so we went out to tender to seek the best combination of sophisticated security and elegance, without being obtrusive to the building’s users.” Touchless fingerprint scanners for privacy Touchless fingerprint scanners were chosen to control access to secured floors and areas of the building Touchless fingerprint scanners were chosen to control access to secured floors and areas of the building, because they provide an extra level of privacy that was attractive to tenants. “A computer algorithm converts each person’s unique fingerprint signature into binary code, zeroes and ones, and uses that code to grant access,” explained Mr. Hodge, adding “Boon Edam turnstiles have the ability to integrate facial recognition, which could be highly valuable in other projects, but the fingerprint scanners were the right fit for this building. Boon Edam made it simple to integrate the scanners with their optical turnstiles, which helped us meet project deadlines.” Effective management of system installations For such a complex project, installation always has its challenges, including managing installation work as people continue to use the building. Mr. Bill Garrett, Facility Manager at Gateway Building, was impressed by Boon Edam’s service and installation team. He said, “The Boon Edam installation team always ensured safety was the number one priority and they did a quality job, even with some very difficult-to-access areas.” Garrett adds, “I’m delighted with the result of the project. One of the major benefits of the new entry system is that there’s a dedicated underground entrance for tradespeople, couriers and deliveries, which removes congestion and bulky carts from the main lobby. It’s all about enhancing the user experience, and Gateway will set a new benchmark for a seamless, secure and aesthetically pleasing entry.” Staged approach towards system implementation The testing, combined with the staged approach, allowed for a smooth transition to the new security technology" Mr. Garrett explained that to get tenants used to a totally new system, they adopted a staged approach. At first, the turnstiles were put into place but left in the open position and after an initial period, some of the turnstiles were closed so that tenants could try entering using the new technology, if they wished. Finally, the entire system was fully implemented. “In addition to this staged approach, we met with key tenants and allowed them to test the system in advance. The testing, combined with the staged approach, allowed for a smooth transition to the new security technology,” said Garrett. Scope of touchless access control technologies Now that the technology has been successfully rolled out at Gateway, Dexus is looking at other locations that could utilise the same harmony of security technologies. “We are continuing to assess opportunities to implement touchless technologies in new developments as well as in our existing buildings,” said Mr. Hodge. “The stylish and secure entrance at Gateway has been ideal through the COVID-19 pandemic. It manages flow, queries guests on recent visits to pandemic hotspots, if they are feeling any symptoms, and can record all entrants to the building, helping us meet government requirements. And the same features will be beneficial in a broader context, too, to help mitigate against unauthorised entry,” concludes Hodge. Dexus is actively exploring the possibility of rolling out similar security entrance systems in other buildings, thereby delivering the seamless balance of security and elegance.