Hanwha Techwin America HD-SDI technology offers the benefits of full HD over analogue cabling
Hanwha Techwin America HD-SDI technology offers the benefits of full HD over analogue cabling

Until now, the capture, viewing and recording of high definition images has been synonymous with IP network systems. The technology however built into Samsung's new HD-SDI cameras and DVR allows the transmission of uncompressed and non-packetised Full HD (1080P) video over analogue cabling.One of the main benefits of HD-SDI technology is that there is zero loss of image data and zero latency when viewing images. This makes Samsung's new SCB-6000 fixed camera and SCD-6080 internal dome ideal for applications where evidence grade images are required, such as airports, ports, banks, casinos and retail environments, but where is it not viable or cost effective, to transmit the images over a network.In order to offer a complete HD-SDI solution, Samsung has also introduced the HD-SDI four-channel SRD-480D DVR which offers real-time 1080p across selected channels or real-time at 720p resolution across all channels. "Whilst it is inevitable that in the future the vast majority of video surveillance systems will be IP based, there will always be situations where an analogue based solution best meets the requirements of specific projects." said Peter Ainsworth, Senior Product Manager at Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd. "The HD-SDI technology built into the new camera and DVR range  makes it possible for installers to offer their customers all the benefits of HD megapixel  cameras without having to have any specialist knowledge of Ethernet cabling, switches, hubs and servers associated with IP based systems. Equally important, a Samsung HD-SDI solution is fully compatible with Samsung's licence-free Net-i Viewer software allowing users to view analogue, network and HD-SDI technologies on one common platform across an entire site."The SCB-6000 fixed camera and SCD-6080 internal dome are both true day/night cameras which can capture and transmit Full HD images up to 100 meters over analogue cabling in real-time at 25 frames per second. Both models feature Super Noise Reduction (SSNRIII) technology, Samsung Super Dynamic Range (SSDR) and Highlight Compensation, whilst delivering over five times the image resolution that standard definition analogue cameras are able to achieve.The maximum transmission distance between the SCB-6000 or the SCD-6080 and a recording device can be increased to 200 metres when low-loss L-6CHD coaxial cable is installed. The transmission distance will be further extended when Samsung introduce in the near future the SPH-120R Repeater. As is the case with all Samsung professional security products, the HD-SDI range is supplied with full support services from Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd, including free system design, free technical support and a full three-year warranty.For further information please email STEsecurity@samsung.com or telephone +44 (0)1932 45 5308 or visit www.samsungsecurity.com.

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Hanwha Techwin America SCP-2370RH weatherproof 37 x zoom PTZ dome camera with built-in IR LEDs
Hanwha Techwin America SCP-2370RH weatherproof 37 x zoom PTZ dome camera with built-in IR LEDs

With built-in IR LEDs, Samsung’s new weatherproof 37x optical PTZ dome camera, the SCP-2370RH,  is capable of capturing high resolution images both during daylight hours and in pitch-black darkness, making it suitable for a wide range of applications requiring effective 24-hour surveillance, including car parks, industrial estates, petrol forecourts, schools, hospitals and retail parks. With an IP66 weatherproof rating and equipped with a fan and heater, the SCP-2370RH will also be at home in more demanding external environments that are prone to severe weather conditions such as airports and  ports. At night, or in any environments where there may be inadequate lighting, the camera’s built-in IR LEDs are automatically activated and provide effective lighting up to a distance of 100 metres. The IR intensity is automatically adjusted to provide the appropriate level of IR light, depending on the zoom ratio. Incorporating Samsung’s W-5 DSP chipset, the SCP-2370RH, which features a true day/night camera with an integrated infrared cut filter, benefits from SSNRIII Samsung Super Noise Reduction technology which eliminates image noise in low-light conditions without creating ghosting or blurring and with the bonus that it can save up to 70% hard disk space whilst minimising bandwidth requirements when viewing the video over a network. Other features include eight privacy masking zones, motion detection and Highlight Compensation technology which identifies and neutralises excessively bright areas in an image, enabling an operator to view previously hidden details. The SCP-2370RH is also equipped with Digital Image Stabilisation (DIS) technology which can negate the effects of the camera shaking due to high winds or building vibration. Coaxial control compatibility allows the SCP-2370RH’s multi-language on-screen display menu to be accessed from the comfort of the control room via a compatible DVR. This allows both video and telemetry to be transmitted via the coaxial cable, giving full access to camera set-up and pan-tilt-zoom functions via a compatible digital video recorder.  A demonstration of a side by side comparison of a standard camera and Samsung's SCP-2370RH camera can be seen at: http://www.samsungsecurity.co.uk/videolibrary  As is the case with all Samsung professional security products, the SCP-2370RH  is supplied with full support services from Samsung Techwin Europe Ltd, including free system design, free technical support and a full three-year warranty. For further information please email STEsecurity@samsung.com or telephone +44 (0) 1932 45 5308 or www.samsungcctv.com

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Dome cameras - Expert commentary

How effective security departments bust multi-million dollar crimes
How effective security departments bust multi-million dollar crimes

It had been a particularly slow night. The plant security guard had just made his rounds on this Sunday evening shift. As soon as he passed the weighing scales, he could enter the guard shack and get off his feet. Challenging a curious incident However, on this night, he noticed the waste vendor’s truck sitting half on and half off the scale. He stopped dead in his tracks to see if the truck would back up and completely sit on the scale. It never did. The observant guard walked up to the truck and challenged the driver who seemed surprised. “Hey, you’re not weighing your truck properly.” The driver fumbled for a response before replying, “Sorry, I was on the phone with a friend. I didn’t notice it.” But this security guard had the presence of mind to demand the driver’s phone. The driver was caught off guard and surrendered the phone. The guard then pulled up the most recent incoming/outgoing calls and saw no calls during the last 30 minutes. “I don’t think so.” “You don’t think so what?” The security guard was frank, “You haven’t used this phone in over half an hour.” The truck driver sheepishly acknowledged the fact. It was decided to install CCTV covering the weighing area and scales – no easy feat due to poor lighting Preventing crime as it happens Knowing the driver was lying, the security guard ordered the truck back on the scale for a correct weighing and advised the driver that he would report the incident. The security guard wrote up his report and handed it off to his supervisor who, in turn, contacted the local corporate investigator. This investigator was soon on the phone with his boss at corporate headquarters on the other side of the world. Together with Security, they decided to install CCTV covering the weighing area and scales – no easy feat due to poor lighting. However, once completed, they waited. They would not have to wait long. For the next two months, the waste vendor trucks, filled to the brim with production waste, black-and-white paper and other waste products from the plant, would stop on the scale only for a moment and then drive the front half of the truck off the scale for weighing. It was obvious that the vendor was cheating the company by only paying for half the waste. After two months, it was decided to catch the next cheating driver “en flagrante.” Sure enough, the next truck went half on and half off the scale and was weighed. Security then asked the unsuspecting driver to park his truck and invited him inside the building to talk to a supervisor. The driver signed an incriminating statement about the scheme and his role therein. They sent him on his way asking him to keep it quiet Waiting for the driver in a large office was the local investigator and his close friend, the Head of Security. After a difficult interview, the driver admitted to cheating on the scales over a two-year period—he claimed that some of the scale cheating was done at the direction of the vendor’s management, while some of it he did himself by “ripping off” the vendor—which he acknowledged was dangerous. Working with authorities The driver signed an incriminating statement about the scheme and his role therein. They sent him on his way asking him to keep it quiet—they would see what they could do for him later on. In the meantime, Corporate Investigations had received a due diligence report on the vendor company which contained disturbing news—the company and its managers were associated with a countrywide waste management mafia. The report suggested that the vendor had a reputation for thefts and involvement in numerous lawsuits regarding thefts and embezzlement. Shockingly, no prior due diligence had ever been conducted on the vendor. Fortunately, the plant’s finance and audit team had maintained good records over the past 5 years and were able to re-construct the amount of waste going out the plant door and the amounts being claimed and paid for by the vendor. The discrepancy and loss stood at a multi-million dollar figure. After consulting with the local police authorities and company lawyers, it was decided to pursue a civil case against the vendor. Pursuing legal action The regional lawyer, the Head of Investigations, the Head of Security and the CFO invited the vendor to discuss the problem. Some of the evidence was shown to the vendor’s CEO who became indignant and, in order to save face, promised to fire the truck drivers and to repay any losses for the last two months. Inter-dependent entities - security, investigations, finance/audit and legal - combined their resources and agendas to form a unified front That was not enough for the company and a protracted legal battle ensued which lasted several years and resulted in the vendor’s paying almost the entire amount in instalments. The vendor was dropped from the contract and internal controls strengthened—the only plant employee dealing with the waste issue left the company and was replaced by two individuals. The plant also began paying more attention to the waste process and less to the production side. Several “lessons learned” come to mind. First, the tripwire came in the person of an astute and well-trained security guard who exhibited some of the best characteristics you want to see from men and women in that profession. The Security Department was also adept at installing the CCTV and capturing the fraud live on videotape. But a far greater lesson was learned—of what can happen when inter-dependent entities (security, investigations, finance/audit and legal) within a company combine their resources and agendas to form a unified front. The results speak for themselves.

5 key ways to ensure end-to-end perimeter protection
5 key ways to ensure end-to-end perimeter protection

Critical infrastructure facilities that must secure large areas with extended outer boundary and numerous entry points, present a particularly difficult challenge when it comes to perimeter protection. As such, true end-to-end perimeter protection calls for the utilisation of a sophisticated, multi-layered solution that is capable of defending against anticipated threats. Integrated systems that incorporate thermal imaging, visible cameras, radar and strong command and control software are crucial for covering the various potential areas of attacks. Let’s look at these technologies and the five key functions they enable to achieve an end-to-end solution that provides intrusion detection, assessment and defense for the perimeter. 1. Threat recognition The first step in effectively defending against a threat is recognising that it’s there. By combining state-of-the-art intrusion detection technologies, facilities can arm themselves with a head start against possible intruders. An exceptionally important aspect of effective perimeter protection is the ability to conduct 24-hour surveillance, regardless of weather conditions, environmental settings, or time of day. Visible cameras do not perform as well in low light scenarios and inclement weather conditions. However, thermal imaging cameras can provide constant protection against potential intruders, regardless of visual limitations, light source or many environmental factors. In fact, facilities such as power stations located near bodies of water can use thermal cameras to create what is known as a “thermal virtual fence” in areas where they are unable to utilise the protection of a physical fence or wall. Deterring suspicious activity can be achieved through real-time two-way audio, a simple but powerful tool Critical infrastructure applications require not only continuous video surveillance and monitoring, but also a solution that yields highly reliable intrusion detection, with fewer false alarms. This need makes advanced video analytics a must for any adequate surveillance system. Features like dynamic event detection and simplified data presentation are game changing in supporting accurate intrusion analysis and facilitating a proactive response. Advanced analytics will provide multiple automated alarm notification options, including email, edge image storage, digital outputs or video management software (VMS) alarms. Incorporating high quality, unique and adaptive analytics can virtually eliminate false alarms, allowing security personnel to respond more efficiently and effectively, while also lowering overall cost for the end user. While surveillance technologies such as radar, thermal imaging and visible cameras, or video analytics work well on their own, utilising all of these options together provides an advanced perimeter detection system. For example, ground surveillance radar can detect possible threats beyond the fence line as they approach and send a signal to pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras, triggering them to slew to a specific location. From there, embedded analytics and visible cameras can further identify objects, notify authorised staff, and collect additional evidence through facial recognition or high-quality photos. 2. Automatic response systems Once an intrusion attempt is discovered, it is important to act fast. Organising a response system that can initiate actions based on GPS location data, such as the slewing of PTZ cameras, automated intruder tracking or activated lighting sensors, greatly increases staff’s situational awareness while easing their workload. For instance, thermal imagers deployed in conjunction with video analytics can be used to generate an initial alarm event, which can then trigger a sequence of other security equipment and notifications for personnel to eventually respond to. Having all of this in place essentially lays the entire situation out in a way that allows responders to accurately understand and evaluate a scene. Power stations located near bodies of water can use thermal cameras to create a “thermal virtual fence” in areas where they are unable to utilise the protection of a physical fence or wall 3. Deterring suspicious activity After the designated auto-response mechanisms have activated and done their job, it is time for responders to acknowledge and assess the situation. From here, authorised personnel can take the next appropriate step toward defending against and delaying the threat. Deterring suspicious activity can be achieved through real-time two-way audio, a simple but powerful tool. Often, control room operators can diffuse a situation by speaking over an intercom, telling the trespasser that they are being watched and that the authorities have been notified. This tactic, known as ‘talk down’, also allows officers to view the intruder’s reaction to their commands and evaluate what they feel the best next step is. If individuals do not respond in a desired manner, it may be time to take more serious action and dispatch a patrolman to the area. 4. Delay, defend, dispatch and handle The possible danger has been identified, recognised and evaluated. Now it is time to effectively defend against current attacks and slow down both cyber and physical perpetrators’ prospective efforts. Through the use of a well-designed, open platform VMS, security monitors can manage edge devices and other complementary intrusion detection and response technologies, including acoustic sensors, video analytics, access control and radio dispatch. A robust VMS also enables operators to control functions such as video replay, geographical information systems tracking, email alerts and hand-off to law enforcement. With the right combination of technologies, facilities can take monitoring and evidence collection to the next level The primary purpose of the delay facet of the overall perimeter protection strategy is to stall an attempted intrusion long enough for responders to act. Access control systems play a key role in realising this objective. When a security officer sees a non-compliant, suspicious individual on the camera feed, the officer can lock all possible exits to trap them in one area all through the VMS. 5. Intelligence: Collect evidence and debrief More data and intelligence collected from an event equals more crucial evidence for crime resolution and valuable insight for protecting against future incidents. With the right combination of technologies, facilities can take monitoring and evidence collection to the next level. One innovative resource that has become available is a live streaming application that can be uploaded to smart phones and used for off-site surveillance. This app gives personnel the power to follow intruders with live video anywhere and allows operators to monitor alarm video in real-time. Geographic Information System (GIS) maps are computer systems utilised for capturing, storing, reviewing, and displaying location related data. Capable of displaying various types of data on one map, this system enables users to see, analyse, easily and efficiently. Multi-sensor cameras, possessing both visible and thermal capabilities, provide high-contrast imaging for superb analytic detection (in any light) and High Definition video for evidence such as facial ID or license plate capture. Integrating these two, usually separated, camera types into one helps to fill any gaps that either may normally have. Still, in order to capture and store all of this valuable information and more, a robust, VMS is required. Recorded video, still images and audio clips serve as valuable evidence in the event that a trial must take place to press charges. Control room operators can use data collection tools within their VMS to safely transfer video evidence from the field to the courtroom with just a few clicks of their mouse. More advanced video management systems can go a step further and package this data with other pertinent evidence to create a comprehensive report to help ensure conviction.

Global security market focused on organisational collaboration in 2016
Global security market focused on organisational collaboration in 2016

In the past year, we have continued to see that the global security market is both dynamic and evolving. The term “security” no longer means simply protecting the perimeter of a building; it also involves securing corporate networks and sensitive data. In 2016, this trend was driven by a change in organisational threats. Businesses as a whole are much more focused on cyber-threats, a growing paradigm that challenges business and security leaders to stay one step ahead of crime and fraud trends. A string of recent high-profile breaches, including several involving government agencies, exposes the vulnerabilities faced by organisations across the globe. Cyber-attackers are holding data for ransom, stealing personally identifiable information, selling sensitive data and destroying critical networks. These threats, which encompass cyber, IT, and physical security, force leadership to recognise the potentially damaging disruptions if risk is not controlled. Internet of Things In 2016, we continued to see significant discussion centred on the promise of the Internet of Things (IoT). At the same time, demand for more mobile capabilities has altered the way people and businesses connect and collaborate. As the demand for network connectivity increases, so too does the need for increased security for physical assets, networks, and valuable corporate data. As a result, we experienced a growing dialogue between IT, cyber security, and physical security teams to help gain a greater knowledge of how to best collaborate. In the coming year, stakeholders must continue to communicate closely to assist in determining vulnerabilities in a more proactive manner. In 2017, we will continue to see Big Data analysis and IoT-powered devices allow for the collection of myriad data points across systems, services, and devices. This process will allow businesses to investigate threats in a more intelligent manner. It will be the organisations that generate actionable intelligence from collected data points that will be firmly positioned to achieve their strategic intelligence and business objectives in the coming years. In 2017, we will continue to see Big Data analysis and IoT-powered devices allowfor the collection of myriad data points across systems, services, and devices Comprehensive security strategies Overall, the alignment of risk management, IT, and business continuity will allow leaders to realise a comprehensive security strategy that takes into account cyber and physical security, and helps leaders proactively recognize threats. Today’s leading global enterprises focus on preventing risk to ensure long-term business continuity. We at Verint practice the same concept, combining physical security, IT functionality, and cybersecurity efforts to help enable our organisation to realise comprehensive intelligence. It has worked well for our business over the past year, and we aim to help our customers achieve the same level of efficiency and knowledge as we reach 2017. Actionable Intelligence is the core of what we do at Verint. We believe that the collaboration of various stakeholders, business functions, and strategies allows organisations to be more focused, effectively identify threats, develop trends, and quickly access relevant data to meet evolving business requirements. See the full coverage of 2016/2017 Review and Forecast articles here Save