CCTV cameras - Expert commentary

How AI and security guards work together using video analytics
How AI and security guards work together using video analytics

How AI and humans can work together is a longstanding debate. As society progresses technologically, there’s always the worry of robots taking over jobs. Self-checkout tills, automated factory machines, and video analytics are all improving efficiency and productivity, but they can still work in tandem with humans, and in most cases, they need to. Video analytics in particular is one impressively intelligent piece of technology that security guards can utilise. How can video analytics help with certain security scenarios? Video analytics tools Before video analytics or even CCTV in general, if a child went missing in a shopping centre, we could only rely on humans. Take a crowded Saturday shopping centre, a complex one with a multitude of shops and eateries, you’d have to alert the security personnel, rely on a tannoy and search party, and hope for a lockdown to find a lost or kidnapped child. With video analytics, how would this scenario play out? It’s pretty mind-blowing. As soon as security is alerted, they can work with the video analytics tools to instruct it precisely With the same scenario, you now have the help of many different cameras, but then there’s the task of searching through all the CCTV resources and footage. That’s where complex search functions come in. As soon as security is alerted, they can work with the video analytics tools to instruct it precisely on what footage to narrow down, and there’s a lot of filters and functions to use. Expected movement direction For instance, they can tick a ‘human’ field, so the AI can track and filter out vehicles, objects etc., and then they can input height, clothing colours, time the child went missing, and last known location. There’s a complex event to check too, under ‘child kidnap’. For a more accurate search, security guards can then add in a searching criterion by drawing the child’s expected movement direction using a visual query function. A unique function like this enables visual criteria-based searches rather than text-based ones. The tech will then narrow down to the images/videos showing the criteria they’ve inputted, showing the object/child that matches the data and filter input. Detecting facial data There are illegal demonstrations and troublesome interferences that police have to deal with A white-list face recognition function is then used to track the child’s route which means the AI can detect facial data that has not been previously saved in the database, allowing it to track the route of a target entity, all in real time. Then, security guards can confirm the child’s route and current location. All up-to-date info can then be transferred to an onsite guard’s mobile phone for them to confirm the missing child’s movement route, face, and current location, helping to find them as quickly as possible. Often, there are illegal demonstrations and troublesome interferences that police have to deal with. Video analytics and surveillance can not only capture these, but they can be used to predict when they may happen, providing a more efficient process in dealing with these types of situations and gathering resources. Event processing functions Picture a public square with a number of entries into the main area, and at each entry point or path, there is CCTV. Those in the control room can set two events for each camera: a grouping event and a path-passing event. These are pretty self-explanatory. A grouping event covers images of seeing people gathering in close proximity and a path-passing event will show when people are passing through or entering. The video analytics tool can look out for large gatherings and increased footfall to alert security By setting these two events, the video analytics tool can look out for large gatherings and increased footfall to alert security or whoever is monitoring to be cautious of protests, demonstrations or any commotion. Using complex event processing functions, over-detection of alarms can also be prevented, especially if there’s a busy day with many passing through. Reducing false alarms By combining the two events, that filters down the triggers for alarms for better accuracy to predict certain situations, like a demonstration. The AI can also be set to only trigger an alarm when the two events are happening simultaneously on all the cameras of each entry to reduce false alarms. There are so many situations and events that video analytics can be programmed to monitor. You can tick fields to monitor any objects that have appeared, disappeared, or been abandoned. You can also check events like path-passing to monitor traffic, as well as loitering, fighting, grouping, a sudden scene change, smoke, flames, falling, unsafe crossing, traffic jams and car accidents etc. Preventing unsafe situations Complex events can include violations of one-way systems, blacklist-detected vehicles Complex events can include violations of one-way systems, blacklist-detected vehicles, person and vehicle tracking, child kidnaps, waste collection, over-speed vehicles, and demonstration detections. The use of video analytics expands our capabilities tremendously, working in real time to detect and help predict security-related situations. Together with security agents, guards and operatives, AI in CCTV means resources can be better prepared, and that the likelihood of preventing unsafe situations can be greatly improved. It’s a winning team, as AI won’t always get it right but it’s there to be the advanced eyes we need to help keep businesses, premises and areas safer.

A three-point plan for enhancing business video surveillance
A three-point plan for enhancing business video surveillance

Cyber threats hit the headlines every day; however digital hazards are only part of the security landscape. In fact, for many organisations - physical rather than virtual security will remain the burning priority. Will Liu, Managing Director of TP-Link UK, explores the three key elements that companies must consider when implementing modern-day business surveillance systems.  1) Protecting more than premises Video surveillance systems are undoubtedly more important than ever before for a huge number of businesses across the full spectrum of public and private sector, manufacturing and service industries. One simple reason for this is the increased use of technology within those businesses. Offices, workshops, and other facilities house a significant amount of valuable and expensive equipment - from computers, and 3D printers to specialised machinery and equipment. As a result, workplaces are now a key target for thieves, and ensuring the protection of such valuable assets is a top priority. A sad reality is that some of those thieves will be employees themselves. Video surveillance system Of course, video surveillance is often deployed to combat that threat alone, but actually, its importance goes beyond theft protection. With opportunist thieves targeting asset-rich sites more regularly, the people who work at these sites are in greater danger too. Effective and efficient surveillance is imperative not just for physical asset protection, but also for the safety From this perspective, effective and efficient surveillance is imperative not just for physical asset protection, but also for the safety of colleagues as well. Organisations need to protect the people who work, learn or attend the premises. A video surveillance system is, therefore, a great starting point for companies looking to deter criminal activity. However, to be sure you put the right system in place to protect your hardware assets, your people, and the business itself, here are three key considerations that make for a successful deployment. 2) Fail to prepare, and then prepare to fail Planning is the key to success, and surveillance systems are no different. Decide in advance the scope of your desired solution. Each site is different and the reality is that every solution is different too. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all solution and only by investing time on the exact specification can you arrive at the most robust and optimal solution.  For example, organisations need to consider all the deployment variables within the system’s environment. What is the balance between indoor and outdoor settings; how exposed to the elements are the outdoor cameras; what IP rating to the need? A discussion with a security installer will help identify the dangerous areas that need to be covered and the associated best sites for camera locations. Camera coverage After determining location and coverage angles, indoors and outdoors, the next step is to make sure the cameras specified are up to the job for each location. Do they have the right lens for the distance they are required to cover, for example? It is not as simple as specifying one type of camera and deploying it everywhere. Devices that can use multiple power sources, Direct Current, or Power over Ethernet well are far more versatile You have to consider technical aspects such as the required level of visual fidelity and whether you also need two-way audio at certain locations? Another simple consideration is how the devices are powered. Devices that can use multiple power sources, Direct Current or Power over Ethernet as well are far more versatile and reliable. Answers to these questions and a lot more need to be uncovered by an expert, to deliver a best-of-breed solution for the particular site. 3) Flexibility breeds resilience Understanding exactly what you need is the start. Ensuring you can install, operate and manage your video surveillance system is the next step. Solutions that are simple to install and easy to maintain will always be favoured - for example, cameras that have multiple sources of power can be vital for year-round reliability. Alongside the physical aspect of any installation, there is also the software element that needs to be considered. The last thing organisations need is a compatibility headache once all their cameras and monitoring stations are in place. Selecting cameras and equipment with the flexibility to support a variety of different operating systems and software is important not just for the days following the installation, but also to future-proof the solution against change.  Easy does it Once the system is up and running, the real work of video surveillance begins. Therefore, any organisation considering deploying a system should look to pick one that makes the day-to-day operation as easy as possible to manage. And again - that is all about the set-up. Cameras can also provide alerts if they have been tampered with or their settings changed The most modern systems and technology can deliver surveillance systems that offer smarter detection, enhanced activity reporting so you learn more about your operations, and also make off-site, remote management easy to both implement and adjust as conditions change. For example, camera software that immediately notifies controllers when certain parameters are met - like motion detection that monitors a specific area for unauthorised access. Cameras can also provide alerts if they have been tampered with or their settings changed without proper authorisation. Remote management of HD footage What’s more, the days of poor quality or unreliable transfer of video are long gone. The high-quality HD footage can be captured, stored, and transferred across networks without any degradation, with hard drives or cloud-based systems able to keep hundreds of days of high-quality recordings for analysis of historical data. Finally, the best surveillance solutions also allow for secure remote management not just from a central control room, but also from personal devices and mobile apps. All this delivers ‘always-on’ security and peace of mind. The watchword in security Modern video surveillance takes organisational security to the next level. It protects physical assets, ensures workplace and workforce safety, and helps protect the operations, reputation, and profitability of a business.  However, this is not just an ‘off-the-shelf purchase’. It requires proper planning in the form of site surveys, equipment and software specifications, as well as an understanding of operational demands and requirements. Investing time in planning will help businesses realise the best dividends in terms of protection. Ultimately, that means organisations should seek to collaborate with vendors who offer site surveys - they know their equipment best, your needs, and can work with you to create the perfect solution.

Video surveillance as a service (VSaaS) from an integrator and user perspective
Video surveillance as a service (VSaaS) from an integrator and user perspective

Technology based on the cloud has become a popular trend. Most IT systems now operate within the cloud or offer cloud capabilities, and video surveillance is no exception: virtually every major hardware and software vendor offers cloud-based services. Users benefit from the cloud due to its numerous advantages, such as ease of implementation, scalability, low maintenance costs, etc. Video surveillance as a service (VSaaS) offers many choices, so there is an optimal solution for each user. However, what about integrators? For them, VSaaS is also a game-changer. Integrators are now incentivised to think about how they can maintain their markets and take advantage of the new business opportunities that the cloud model provides.   Hosted video surveillance The cloud service model has drastically changed the role of an integrator. Traditionally, integrators provided a variety of services including system installation, support, and maintenance, as well as served as a bridge between vendors and end-users. In contrast, hosted video surveillance as a service requires a security system installer to simply install cameras and connect them to the network, while the provider is in direct contact with each end-user. The cloud service model has drastically changed the role of an integrator There is no end to on-premises systems. However, the percentage of systems where the integrator’s role is eliminated or considerably reduced will continue to increase. How can integrators sustain their markets and stay profitable? A prospective business model might be to become a provider of VSaaS (‘cloud integrator’) in partnership with software platform vendors. Cloud-based surveillance Some VMS vendors offer software VSaaS platforms that form the basis for cloud-based surveillance systems. Using these solutions, a data centre operator, integrator, or telecom service provider can design a public VSaaS or VSaaS in a private cloud to service a large customer. The infrastructure can be built on any generic cloud platform or data centre, as well as resources owned by the provider or client. So, VSaaS providers have the choice between renting infrastructure from a public cloud service like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, or Google Cloud or using their own or clients’ computing infrastructure (virtual machines or physical servers). Gaining competitive advantage When integrators purchase commitment use contracts for several years, they can achieve significant savings As an example, a telecom carrier could deploy VSaaS on their own infrastructure to expand their service offering for clients, gaining a competitive advantage and enhancing profits per user. Using a public cloud, a smaller integrator can host the computing infrastructure immediately, without incurring up-front costs and with no need to maintain the system. These cloud services provide scalability, security, and reliability with zero initial investment. When integrators purchase commitment use contracts for several years, they can achieve significant savings. Next, let’s examine VSaaS options available in the market from an end-users point of view. With hosted (or cloud-first, or true-cloud) VSaaS solutions, all the video feeds are transmitted directly from cameras to the cloud. Optionally, video can be buffered to SD cards installed on cameras to prevent data losses in case of Internet connection failures. Dedicated hardware bridges There are many providers of such services that offer their own brand cameras. Connecting these devices to the cloud should only take a few clicks. Firmware updates are usually centralised, so users don’t have to worry about security breaches. Service providers may offer dedicated hardware bridges for buffering video footage and secure connections to the cloud for their branded and third-party cameras. Service providers may offer dedicated hardware bridges for buffering video footage Typical bridges are inexpensive, basic NVRs that receive video feeds from cameras, record on HDD, and send video streams to the cloud. The most feature-rich bridges include those with video analytics, data encryption, etc. Introducing a bridge or NVR makes the system hybrid, with videos stored both locally and in the cloud. At the other end of the spectrum relative to hosted VSaaS, there are cloud-managed systems. Video management software In this case, video is stored on-site on DVRs, NVRs, video management software servers, or even locally on cameras, with an option of storing short portions of footage (like alarm videos) in the cloud for quick access. A cloud service can be used for remote viewing live video feeds and recorded footage, as well as for system configuration and health monitoring. Cloud management services often come bundled with security cameras, NVRs, and video management software, whereas other VSaaS generally require subscriptions. Keep in mind that the system, in this case, remains on-premises, and the advantages of the cloud are limited to remote monitoring and configuring. It’s a good choice for businesses that are spread across several locations or branches, especially if they have systems in place at each site. On-site infrastructure All that needs to be changed is the NVRs or VMS with a cloud-compatible model or version All locations and devices can be remotely monitored using the cloud while keeping most of the existing on-site infrastructure. All that needs to be changed is the NVRs or VMS with a cloud-compatible model or version. Other methods are more costly and/or require more resources to implement. Hosted VSaaS helps leverage the cloud for the highest number of benefits in terms of cost and technological advantages. In this case, the on-site infrastructure consists of only IP cameras and network equipment. This reduces maintenance costs substantially and also sets the foundation for another advantage of VSaaS: extreme and rapid scalability. At the same time, the outgoing connection at each site is critical for hosted VSaaS. Video quality and the number of cameras directly depend on bandwidth. Broadband-connected locations Because the system does not work offline, a stable connection is required to stream videos. In addition, cloud storage can be expensive when many cameras are involved, or when video archives are retained for an extended period. The hosted VSaaS is a great choice for a small broadband-connected location The hosted VSaaS is a great choice for small broadband-connected locations and is also the most efficient way to centralise video surveillance for multiple sites of the same type, provided they do not have a legacy system. Since it is easy to implement and maintain, this cloud technology is especially popular in countries with high labour costs. Using different software and hardware platforms, integrators can implement various types of VSaaS solutions. Quick remote access For those who adhere to the classic on-premises approach, adding a cloud-based monitoring service can grow their value proposition for clients with out-of-the-box capabilities of quick remote access to multiple widely dispersed sites and devices. For small true-cloud setups, there is a possibility to rent a virtual machine and storage capacity in a public cloud (such as Amazon, Google, or Microsoft) and deploy the cloud-based VMS server that can handle dozens of cameras. In terms of features, such a system may include anything from plain video monitoring via a web interface to GPU-accelerated AI video analytics and smart search in recorded footage, depending on the particular software platform. Optimising internet connection Hybrid VSaaS is the most flexible approach that enables tailoring the system to the users’ needs High-scale installations, such as VSaaS for public use or large private systems for major clients, involve multiple parts like a virtual VMS server cluster, web portal, report subsystem, etc. Such systems can also utilise either own or rented infrastructure. Some vendors offer software for complex installations of this kind, though there are not as many options as for cloud-managed systems. Finally, hybrid VSaaS is the most flexible approach that enables tailoring the system to the users’ unique needs while optimising internet connection bandwidth, cloud storage costs, and infrastructure complexity. It’s high time for integrators to gain experience, choose the right hardware and software, and explore different ways of building systems that will suit evolving customer demands in the future.

Latest Moxa Europe GmbH news

Moxa unveils EDR-G9010 Series industrial secure routers for safeguarding industrial applications
Moxa unveils EDR-G9010 Series industrial secure routers for safeguarding industrial applications

Moxa Inc., a globally renowned company in industrial communications and networking, with a focus on securing industrial networks, has introduced the new EDR-G9010 Series. These industry-certified, all-in-one firewall/NAT/VPN/switch/routers, act as a robust first line of defence for industrial networks, in diverse applications, such as smart manufacturing and critical infrastructure. EDR-G9010 Series industrial secure routers Moxa’s EDR-G9010 Series industrial secure routers offer 10-port GbE performance and defence-in-depth security capabilities, in order to fulfill the needs of bandwidth-hungry applications that require field-proven reliability and multi-layered security. With more and more cyber security incidents occurring in operational technology (OT) systems, enhancing industrial network security becomes a key priority for business owners and chief security officers. However, in OT environments, network requirements are not just concerned with security, but also focus on keeping operations functioning smoothly. Network security solution for OT environments With the launch of the new EDR-G9010 Series, Moxa brings a tailor-made network security solution for OT environments" “With the launch of the new EDR-G9010 Series, Moxa brings a tailor-made network security solution for OT environments,” said Kevin Huang, Product Manager at Moxa Networking, adding “We recommend our customers to use the EDR-G9010 Series industrial secure routers, to segment their networks as a first line of defence and prevent threats from propagating to the rest of the network.” He adds, “Furthermore, users can leverage its advanced OT Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) technology, firewall, NAT, and VPN features, to achieve multi-layered security. Last, but not least, the 10-port Gigabit performance, faster boot time and Layer 2/Layer 3 redundancy helps ensure the availability of industrial networks.” Compact and rugged industrial secure router Kevin Huang further stated, “The EDR-G9010 Series combines all these powerful functions into a single compact, rugged, industry-certified industrial secure router. Overall, the EDRG9010 series will be Moxa’s future-proof secure routing platform, with additional capabilities being added over time.” The EDR-G9010 Series industrial secure routers offer: Advanced Network Protection with Network Segmentation and Advanced DPI - Within one field site, the EDR-G9010 Series industrial secure routers can help build a security boundary, by segmenting OT and IT networks, and feature advanced DPI technology, to give users more granular control over network traffic, by filtering industrial protocols, based on the requirements of the application. Moxa will continuously extend the DPI protocol coverage. Starting with Modbus TCP/UDP and DNP3, Moxa will add specifically, power market-related protocols in 2022. When remote connections across multiple sites are needed, the EDR-G9010 Series’ embedded IPsec VPN ensures safe industrial network communication channels, when accessing the private network from the public Internet. Future-proof platform for OT Intrusion Prevention - The superb computing power of the EDR-G9010 platform enables it to run an Intrusion Prevention Module, which will safely block ransomware, malware, viruses and other cyber security threats in OT networks. This signature-based scanning technology will move traffic filtering and asset visibility in OT networks to an unprecedented level. This module is licenced on demand and will be available by mid of 2022. Better Performance with High Bandwidth and Faster Boot Times - With the number of connected devices constantly growing, the EDR-G9010 Series is capable of achieving high throughput, while providing robust security, perfect for bandwidth-hungry applications. Meanwhile, the faster boot time helps reduce system downtime, during regular maintenance or in the event of an emergency recovery situation. More Versatility - The EDR-G9010 Series caters to the needs of different networks, whether it is the need for a firewall, network address translation (NAT), remote VPN communications, switching, or routing. These secure routers are also certified for IEC 61850-3/IEEE 1613, NEMA TS2, ATEX Zone 2, and Class I Division 2. The accessible and versatile all-in-one design makes these devices ideal for securing industrial applications, such as in power substations, intelligent transportation systems, oil and gas, and smart manufacturing. IEC-62443 hardened - Secure routers play a pyramidal role in security architecture and need to be security hardened. Hence, EDRG9010 hardware and software has been developed with Moxa’s IEC-62443-4-1 certified process, and is ready to meet the IEC-62443-4-2 requirements, up to Security Level 2. EDR-G9010 Series 10-port Gigabit Industrial Secure Router highlights include: All-in-one firewall/NAT/VPN/switch/router, 8-port TX GbE and 2-port SFP GbE, Comprehensive redundancy mechanisms, including Turbo Ring and VRRP, Wide -40 to 75°C operating temperature (-T model), Advanced Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) for Modbus TCP/UDP and DNP3 traffic, and 104 and MMS (available in Q1, 2022), and Certified for IEC 61850-3, NEMA TS2, ATEX Zone 2, Class I Division 2, EN 50121-4, DNV, IEC-62443-4-2 SL 2 (available in Q4 2022). Compatible with MXview network management software EDR-G9010 Series is also compatible with Moxa’s MXview network management software To enhance network security visibility, the EDR-G9010 Series is also compatible with Moxa’s MXview network management software. With the MXview, software users can, for example, visualise the achieved security level of IEC-62443-ready Moxa devices, perform regular configurations backups, and have an at-a-glance overview of the network’s performance. With the launch of the EDR-G9010 Series industrial secure routers, Moxa has expanded its secure network infrastructure portfolio, in order to cover a broader range of industrial applications and introduced more granular control over industrial networks, so as to fulfill its ongoing commitment to protect the connectivity of industrial environments. Connectivity for the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) Moxa is a globally renowned provider of edge connectivity, industrial computing and network infrastructure solutions, for enabling connectivity for the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). The company delivers lasting business value, by empowering the industry, with reliable networks and sincere service, for industrial communications infrastructures.

Moxa launches Turbo Pack 3 firmware for industrial Ethernet switches, enhancing device security
Moxa launches Turbo Pack 3 firmware for industrial Ethernet switches, enhancing device security

Moxa's EDS-G500E and EDS-518E/528E DIN-rail switches support Turbo Pack 3, and all of Moxa's industrial Ethernet switches will support the new firmware by 2017 Moxa, a provider of network infrastructure solutions for the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), announced a new firmware upgrade for its industrial Ethernet switches with major enhancements for its security functionalities. This new firmware, called Turbo Pack 3, is not only compliant with the IEC 62443-4-2 level 2 cybersecurity standard, but also supports other security management features, such as MAC Address and RADIUS authentication to prevent from unauthorised access, known security leaks and unknown attacks. At present, Moxa's EDS-G500E and EDS-518E/528E DIN-rail switches support Turbo Pack 3, and all of Moxa's industrial Ethernet switches will support the new firmware by 2017. Increased device-level security According to an ICS-CERT report, cyber-attacks on the critical manufacturing sector increased by 50% from 2014 to 2015. The report noted that a lack of proper access management and network probing are among the most common network vulnerabilities. One of the key mechanisms to ensure a safe and reliable network is to strengthen device-level security. Turbo Pack 3 ensures Moxa's switches comply with the IEC 62443-4-2 level 2 standard, which provides technical security requirements and guidelines for network device suppliers and engineers. Moreover, the new firmware upgrade supports MAC authentication bypass via RADIUS server, and also fixes certain security vulnerabilities to protect the switches from malicious intrusion. Ensure network availability The firmware upgrade also supports enhancements in redundancy technologies, such as V-ON, traffic management, and real-time event notifications. With these new functionalities, Moxa's switches are enable higher network availability and reliability, which is crucial for mission-critical applications.

SeeTec physical security solutions secure oil and gas industry
SeeTec physical security solutions secure oil and gas industry

SeeTec video technology helps to detect situations at an early stage and thus assists in avoiding consequences Despite of the development of alternative and renewable energies, oil and gas still represent the engine of the world economy. Exploration takes place under increasingly challenging conditions often in remote locations. Security requirements, already high, continue to rise. This is not surprising as incidents during up-, mid- and downstream processing can cause immense damage to people and the environment. Video technology systems from SeeTec help detecting situations at an early stage and thus assist in avoiding consequences – at all process levels. SeeTec Cayuga for staff safety Video technology is generally used on drilling vessels and –platforms to monitor the drilling and mining process and to ensure the staff’s safety. SeeTec Cayuga can easily be integrated into this process and also into higher level systems such as DCS for example. Video is then a part of an overall solution using TCP triggers or I/O modules to communicate with the sensor- and control technology. If for example a sensor detects high pressure in the system, an automatic video fly-out window showing video streams of relevant areas is displayed on the screens in the control room. SeeTec Cayuga also supports thermal cameras. Using them, high temperatures can be detected based on the colours displayed. Using video technology critical situations can be detected and validated much faster, giving staff more time to react on the basis of more information. Video analytics with SeeTec video management software Especially the transportation of gas and oil from the production sites to the refineries and the tank farms is a dangerous process. Big parts of overland pipelines lead over uninhabited areas without significant infrastructure, making the monitoring of leaks complicated. Also in politically unstable regions the risk of attacks is a serious threat. If the transportation is done by sea the risk of damage and harm affects not only the vessel but also has impact on the environment. Using SeeTec video management software pipelines are monitored permanently over long distances even if there is only low banded infrastructure. By using intelligent video analytics and by linking to process monitoring systems the attention of the security staff is drawn to possible dangers or incidents. SeeTec video systems provide protection for every need. With SeeTec the building perimeter is continuously monitored Perimeter protection with integrated security systems Next to the operational safety in refineries and production plants, safeguarding against unauthorised access is an important issue. SeeTec video systems provide protection for every need. With SeeTec the building perimeter is continuously monitored. Through the integrated video analytics and the additional analytics interface to third-party applications an automatic perimeter protection is supported. So, for example, a person trying to climb over the premises’ fences will be visualised automatically on the Client in the control room. A built-in license plate recognition solution and the integration of access control applications complement the SeeTec range. In the refinery the video system can also be seamlessly integrated into production processes. It is possible to trigger alarms or other actions over sensors or management systems by using TCP signals or I/O-modules. SeeTec’s modular architecture makes it easy for the product portfolio to grow with increasing demands and/or the growing operational areas. Using distributed installations it is possible to combine several locations to just one bandwidth-optimised system. An extended safety structure ensures that the system keeps on recording images and stays in operational mode even if the management or recording server fails. Retail security Gas stations are at the end of the value chain. They are not struggling with process safety but with robberies and thefts. SeeTec delivers video solutions, which perfectly reflect the branch structure of such a business. SeeTec keeps the costs for the camera infrastructure low by realising a bandwidth-saving usage involving several locations and by using intelligent camera features (VCAM). At the gas station the video technology can also be connected directly to the business processes, so for instance it is possible to combine the video images coming from the pump or the cash area with the accounting data by using the SeeTec POS-Interface. With the automatic license plate recognition a petrol theft can be identified easily – if a car, which already was registered with a tank fraud, is recognised in front of a gas pump, the pump can be locked. Benefits  Modular and flexibly expandable solution Support of a great number of cameras of all leading manufacturers (incl. thermal cameras, LPR cameras, outdoor cameras for special requirements) Integrated video analytics and license plate recognition Communication with third-party systems using TCP signals or I/O modules (Moxa, Adam etc.) Easy handling and operation, also on touch-based systems or mobile devices Project experiences and certifications in the oil & gas-sector

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