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Securing mobile vehicles: The cloud and solving transportation industry challenges
Securing mobile vehicles: The cloud and solving transportation industry challenges

Securing Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in the transportation industry is multi-faceted for a multitude of reasons. Pressures build for transit industry players to modernise their security systems, while also mitigating the vulnerabilities, risks, and growth-restrictions associated with proprietary as well as integrated solutions. There are the usual physical security obstacles when it comes to increasingly integrated solutions and retrofitting updated technologies into legacy systems. Starting with edge devices like cameras and intelligent sensors acquiring video, analytics and beyond, these edge devices are now found in almost all public transportation like buses, trains, subways, airplanes, cruise lines, and so much more. You can even find them in the world’s last manually operated cable car systems in San Francisco. The next layer to consider is the infrastructure and networks that support these edge devices and connect them to centralized monitoring stations or a VMS. Without this layer, all efforts at the edge or stations are in vain as you lose the connection between the two. And the final layer to consider when building a comprehensive transit solution is the software, recording devices, or viewing stations themselves that capture and report the video. The challenge of mobility However, the transportation industry in particular has a very unique challenge that many others do not – mobility. As other industries become more connected and integrated, they don’t usually have to consider going in and out or bouncing between networks as edge devices physically move. Obviously in the nature of transportation, this is key. Have you ever had a bad experience with your cellular, broadband or Wi-Fi at your home or office? You are not alone. The transportation industry in particular has a very unique challenge that many others do not – mobility Can you trust these same environments to record your surveillance video to the Cloud without losing any frames, non-stop 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year? To add to the complexity – how do you not only provide a reliable and secure solution when it’s mobile, travelling at varying speeds, and can be in/out of coverage using various wireless technologies? Waiting to upload video from a transport vehicle when it comes into port, the station, or any centralised location is a reactive approach that simply will not do any longer. Transit operations require a more proactive approach today and the ability to constantly know what is going on at any given time on their mobile vehicles, and escalate that information to headquarters, authorities, or law enforcement if needed; which can only occur with real-time monitoring. This is the ultimate question when it comes to collecting, analysing, and sharing data from mobile vehicles – how to get the video from public transportation vehicles alike to headquarters in real time! Managing video data In order to answer this question, let’s get back to basics. The management and nature of video data differs greatly from conventional (IT) data. Not only is video conducted of large frames, but there are specific and important relationships among the frames and the timing between them. This relationship can easily get lost in translation if not handled properly. This is why it’s critical to consider the proper way to transmit large frames while under unstable or variable networks. The Internet and its protocols were designed more than two decades ago and purposed for conventional data. Although the Internet itself has not changed, today’s network environments run a lot faster, expand to further ranges, and support a variety of different types of data. Because the internet is more reliable and affordable than in the past some might think it can handle anything. However, it is good for data, but not for video. This combination makes it the perfect time to convert video recording to the Cloud! Video transmission protocol One of the main issues with today’s technology is the degradation of video quality when transmitting video over the Internet. ITS are in dire need for reliable transmission of real-time video recording. To address this need a radical, yet proven, video transmission protocol has recently been introduced to the market. It uses AI technology and to adapt to different environments in order to always deliver high quality, complete video frames. This protocol, when equipped with encryption and authentication, enables video to be transmitted reliably and securely over the Internet in a cloud environment. One of the main issues with today’s technology is the degradation of video quality when transmitting video over the Internet Finally, transportation industry has a video recording Cloud solution that is designed for (massive) video that can handle networks that might be experiencing high error rate. Such a protocol will not only answer the current challenges of the transportation industry, but also make the previously risky Cloud environment safe for even the most reserved environments and entities. With revolutionary transmission protocols, the time is now to consider adopting private Cloud for your transportation operations.

The digital transformation of access control solutions
The digital transformation of access control solutions

The safeguarding of premises through the monitoring of entrance and exit points has traditionally been a very manual aspect of security. Human operators have been relied on to make decisions about who to admit and deny based on levels of authorisation and the appropriate credentials. But the access control business, like many industries before it, is undergoing its own digital transformation; one where the protection of premises, assets and people is increasingly delivered by interconnected systems utilising IoT devices and cloud infrastructure to offer greater levels of security and protection. Modern access control solutions range from simple card readers to two factor authentication systems using video surveillance as a secondary means of identification, right through to complex networks of thermal cameras, audio speakers and sensors. These systems, connected through the cloud, can be customised and scaled to meet the precise requirements of today’s customer. And it’s the ease of cloud integration, combined with open technologies and platforms that is encouraging increasing collaboration and exciting developments while rendering legacy systems largely unfit for purpose. Remote management and advanced diagnostics Cloud technology and IoT connectivity means remote management and advanced diagnostics form an integral part of every security solution.Cloud technology and IoT connectivity means remote management and advanced diagnostics form an integral part of every security solution. For example, as the world faces an unprecedented challenge and the COVID-19 pandemic continues to cause disruption, the ability to monitor and manage access to sites remotely is a welcome advantage for security teams who might otherwise have to check premises in person and risk breaking social distancing regulations. The benefits of not physically having to be on site extend to the locations within which these technologies can be utilised. As an example, within a critical infrastructure energy project, access can be granted remotely for maintenance on hard to reach locations. Advanced diagnostics can also play a part in such a scenario. When access control is integrated with video surveillance and IP audio, real-time monitoring of access points can identify possible trespassers with automated audio messages used to deter illegal access and making any dangers clear. And with video surveillance in the mix, high quality footage can be provided to authorities with real-time evidence of a crime in progress. Comprehensive protection in retail Within the retail industry, autonomous, cashier-less stores are already growing in popularity The use of connected technologies for advanced protection extends to many forward-looking applications. Within the retail industry, autonomous, cashier-less stores are already growing in popularity. Customers are able to use mobile technology to self-scan their chosen products and make payments, all from using a dedicated app. From an access control and security perspective, connected doors can be controlled to protect staff and monitor shopper movement. Remote management includes tasks such as rolling out firmware updates or restarting door controllers, with push notifications sent immediately to security personnel in the event of a breach or a door left open. Remote monitoring access control in storage In the storage facility space, this too can now be entirely run through the cloud with remote monitoring of access control and surveillance providing a secure and streamlined service. There is much to gain from automating the customer journey, where storage lockers are selected online and, following payment, customers are granted access. Through an app the customer can share their access with others, check event logs, and activate notifications. With traditional padlocks the sharing of access is not as practical, and it’s not easy for managers to keep a record of storage locker access. Online doors and locks enable monitoring capabilities and heightened security for both operators and customers. The elimination of manual tasks, in both scenarios, represents cost savings. When doors are connected to the cloud, their geographical location is rendered largely irrelevant. Online doors and locks enable monitoring capabilities and heightened security for both operators and customers They become IoT devices which are fully integrated and remotely programmable from anywhere, at any time. This creates a powerful advantage for the managers of these environments, making it possible to report on the status of a whole chain of stores, or to monitor access to numerous storage facilities, using the intelligence that the technology provides from the data it collects. Open platforms power continuous innovation All of these examples rely on open technology to make it possible, allowing developers and technology providers to avoid the pitfalls that come with the use of proprietary systems. The limitations of such systems have meant that the ideas, designs and concepts of the few have stifled the creativity and potential of the many, holding back innovation and letting the solutions become tired and their application predictable. Proprietary systems have meant that solution providers have been unable to meet their customers’ requirements until the latest upgrade becomes available or a new solution is rolled out. This use of open technology enables a system that allows for collaboration, the sharing of ideas and for the creation of partnerships to produce ground-breaking new applications of technology. Open systems demonstrate a confidence in a vendor’s own solutions and a willingness to share and encourage others to innovate and to facilitate joint learning. An example of the dynamic use of open technology is Axis’ physical access control hardware, which enables partners to develop their own cloud-based software for control and analysis of access points, all the while building and expanding on Axis’ technology platform. Modern access control solutions range from simple card readers to two factor authentication systems using video surveillance as a secondary means of identification Opportunities for growth Open hardware, systems and platforms create opportunities for smaller and younger companies to participate and compete, giving them a good starting point, and some leverage within the industry when building and improving upon existing, proven technologies. This is important for the evolution and continual relevance of the physical security industry in a digitally enabled world. Through increased collaboration across technology platforms, and utilising the full range of possibilities afforded by the cloud environment, the manufacturers, vendors and installers of today’s IP enabled access control systems can continue to create smart solutions to meet the ever-changing demands and requirements of their customers across industry.

Cybersecurity: what we can do as an industry
Cybersecurity: what we can do as an industry

In 2017, IoT-based cyberattacks increased by 600%. As the industry moves towards the mass adoption of interconnected physical security devices, end users have found a plethora of advantages, broadening the scope of traditional video surveillance solutions beyond simple safety measures. Thanks in part to these recent advancements, our physical solutions are at a higher risk than ever before. With today’s ever evolving digital landscape and the increasing complexity of physical and cyber-attacks, it’s imperative to take specific precautions to combat these threats. Video surveillance systems Cybersecurity is not usually the first concern to come to mind When you think of a video surveillance system, cybersecurity is not usually the first concern to come to mind, since digital threats are usually thought of as separate from physical security. Unfortunately, these two are becoming increasingly intertwined as intruders continue to use inventive methods in order to access an organisation's assets. Hacks and data breaches are among the top cyber concerns, but many overlook the fact that weak cybersecurity practices can lead to physical danger as well. Organisations that deploy video surveillance devices paired with advanced analytics programs often leave themselves vulnerable to a breach without even realising it. While they may be intelligent, IoT devices are soft targets that cybercriminals and hackers can easily exploit, crippling a physical security system from the inside out. Physical security manufacturers Whether looking to simply gain access to internal data, or paralyse a system prior to a physical attack, allowing hackers easy access to surveillance systems can only end poorly. In order to stay competitive, manufacturers within the security industry are trading in their traditional analogue technology and moving towards interconnected devices. Due to this, security can no longer be solely focused on the physical elements and end users have taken note. The first step towards more secured solutions starts with physical security manufacturers choosing to make cybersecurity a priority for all products, from endpoint to edge and beyond. Gone are the days of end users underestimating the importance of reliability within their solutions. Manufacturers that choose to invest time and research into the development of cyber-hardening will be ahead of the curve and an asset to all. Wireless communication systems Integrators also become complicit in any issues that may arise in the future Aside from simply making the commitment to improve cyber hygiene, there are solid steps that manufacturers can take. One simple action is incorporating tools and features into devices that allow end users to more easily configure their cyber protection settings. Similarly, working with a third party to perform penetration testing on products can help to ensure the backend security of IoT devices. This gives customers peace of mind and manufacturers a competitive edge. While deficient cybersecurity standards can reflect poorly on manufacturers by installing vulnerable devices on a network, integrators also become complicit in any issues that may arise in the future. Just last year, ADT was forced to settle a $16 million class action lawsuit when the company installed an unencrypted wireless communication system that rendered an organisation open to hacks. Cybersecurity services In addition, we’ve all heard of the bans, taxes and tariffs the U.S. government has recently put on certain manufacturers, depending on their country of origin and cybersecurity practices. Lawsuits aside, employing proper cybersecurity standards can give integrators a competitive advantage. With the proliferation of hacks, malware, and ransomware, integrators that can ease their client's cyber-woes are already a step ahead. By choosing to work with cybersecurity-focused manufacturers who provide clients with vulnerability testing and educate end users on best practices, integrators can not only thrive but find new sources of RMR. Education, collaboration and participation are three pillars when tackling cybersecurity from all angles. For dealers and integrators who have yet to add cybersecurity services to their business portfolios, scouting out a strategic IT partner could be the answer. Unlocking countless opportunities Becoming educated on the topic of cybersecurity and its importance for an organisation is the first step Physical security integrators who feel uncomfortable diving headfirst into the digital realm may find that strategically aligning themselves with an IT or cyber firm will unlock countless opportunities. By opening the door to a partnership with an IT-focused firm, integrators receive the benefit of cybersecurity insight on future projects and a new source of RMR through continued consulting with current customers. In exchange, the IT firm gains a new source of clients in an industry otherwise untapped. This is a win for all those involved. While manufacturers, dealers and integrators play a large part in the cybersecurity of physical systems, end users also play a crucial role. Becoming educated on the topic of cybersecurity and its importance for an organisation is the first step. Commonplace cybersecurity standards Below is a list of commonplace cybersecurity standards that all organisations should work to implement for the protection of their own video surveillance solutions: Always keep camera firmware up to date for the latest cyber protections. Change default passwords, especially those of admins, to keep the system locked to outside users. Create different user groups with separate rights to ensure all users have only the permissions they need. Set an encryption key for surveillance recordings to safeguard footage against intruders and prevent hackers from accessing a system through a backdoor. Enable notifications, whether for error codes or storage failures, to keep up to date with all systems happenings. Create/configure an OpenVPN connection for secured remote access. Check the web server log on a regular basis to see who is accessing the system. Ensure that web crawling is forbidden to prevent images or data found on your device from being made searchable. Avoid exposing devices to the internet unless strictly necessary to reduce the risk of attacks.

Latest Moxa Europe GmbH news

Moxa launches Turbo Pack 3 firmware for industrial Ethernet switches, enhancing device security
Moxa launches Turbo Pack 3 firmware for industrial Ethernet switches, enhancing device security

Moxa's EDS-G500E and EDS-518E/528E DIN-rail switches support Turbo Pack 3, and all of Moxa's industrial Ethernet switches will support the new firmware by 2017 Moxa, a provider of network infrastructure solutions for the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), announced a new firmware upgrade for its industrial Ethernet switches with major enhancements for its security functionalities. This new firmware, called Turbo Pack 3, is not only compliant with the IEC 62443-4-2 level 2 cybersecurity standard, but also supports other security management features, such as MAC Address and RADIUS authentication to prevent from unauthorised access, known security leaks and unknown attacks. At present, Moxa's EDS-G500E and EDS-518E/528E DIN-rail switches support Turbo Pack 3, and all of Moxa's industrial Ethernet switches will support the new firmware by 2017. Increased device-level security According to an ICS-CERT report, cyber-attacks on the critical manufacturing sector increased by 50% from 2014 to 2015. The report noted that a lack of proper access management and network probing are among the most common network vulnerabilities. One of the key mechanisms to ensure a safe and reliable network is to strengthen device-level security. Turbo Pack 3 ensures Moxa's switches comply with the IEC 62443-4-2 level 2 standard, which provides technical security requirements and guidelines for network device suppliers and engineers. Moreover, the new firmware upgrade supports MAC authentication bypass via RADIUS server, and also fixes certain security vulnerabilities to protect the switches from malicious intrusion. Ensure network availability The firmware upgrade also supports enhancements in redundancy technologies, such as V-ON, traffic management, and real-time event notifications. With these new functionalities, Moxa's switches are enable higher network availability and reliability, which is crucial for mission-critical applications.

SeeTec physical security solutions secure oil and gas industry
SeeTec physical security solutions secure oil and gas industry

SeeTec video technology helps to detect situations at an early stage and thus assists in avoiding consequences Despite of the development of alternative and renewable energies, oil and gas still represent the engine of the world economy. Exploration takes place under increasingly challenging conditions often in remote locations. Security requirements, already high, continue to rise. This is not surprising as incidents during up-, mid- and downstream processing can cause immense damage to people and the environment. Video technology systems from SeeTec help detecting situations at an early stage and thus assist in avoiding consequences – at all process levels. SeeTec Cayuga for staff safety Video technology is generally used on drilling vessels and –platforms to monitor the drilling and mining process and to ensure the staff’s safety. SeeTec Cayuga can easily be integrated into this process and also into higher level systems such as DCS for example. Video is then a part of an overall solution using TCP triggers or I/O modules to communicate with the sensor- and control technology. If for example a sensor detects high pressure in the system, an automatic video fly-out window showing video streams of relevant areas is displayed on the screens in the control room. SeeTec Cayuga also supports thermal cameras. Using them, high temperatures can be detected based on the colours displayed. Using video technology critical situations can be detected and validated much faster, giving staff more time to react on the basis of more information. Video analytics with SeeTec video management software Especially the transportation of gas and oil from the production sites to the refineries and the tank farms is a dangerous process. Big parts of overland pipelines lead over uninhabited areas without significant infrastructure, making the monitoring of leaks complicated. Also in politically unstable regions the risk of attacks is a serious threat. If the transportation is done by sea the risk of damage and harm affects not only the vessel but also has impact on the environment. Using SeeTec video management software pipelines are monitored permanently over long distances even if there is only low banded infrastructure. By using intelligent video analytics and by linking to process monitoring systems the attention of the security staff is drawn to possible dangers or incidents. SeeTec video systems provide protection for every need. With SeeTec the building perimeter is continuously monitored Perimeter protection with integrated security systems Next to the operational safety in refineries and production plants, safeguarding against unauthorised access is an important issue. SeeTec video systems provide protection for every need. With SeeTec the building perimeter is continuously monitored. Through the integrated video analytics and the additional analytics interface to third-party applications an automatic perimeter protection is supported. So, for example, a person trying to climb over the premises’ fences will be visualised automatically on the Client in the control room. A built-in license plate recognition solution and the integration of access control applications complement the SeeTec range. In the refinery the video system can also be seamlessly integrated into production processes. It is possible to trigger alarms or other actions over sensors or management systems by using TCP signals or I/O-modules. SeeTec’s modular architecture makes it easy for the product portfolio to grow with increasing demands and/or the growing operational areas. Using distributed installations it is possible to combine several locations to just one bandwidth-optimised system. An extended safety structure ensures that the system keeps on recording images and stays in operational mode even if the management or recording server fails. Retail security Gas stations are at the end of the value chain. They are not struggling with process safety but with robberies and thefts. SeeTec delivers video solutions, which perfectly reflect the branch structure of such a business. SeeTec keeps the costs for the camera infrastructure low by realising a bandwidth-saving usage involving several locations and by using intelligent camera features (VCAM). At the gas station the video technology can also be connected directly to the business processes, so for instance it is possible to combine the video images coming from the pump or the cash area with the accounting data by using the SeeTec POS-Interface. With the automatic license plate recognition a petrol theft can be identified easily – if a car, which already was registered with a tank fraud, is recognised in front of a gas pump, the pump can be locked. Benefits  Modular and flexibly expandable solution Support of a great number of cameras of all leading manufacturers (incl. thermal cameras, LPR cameras, outdoor cameras for special requirements) Integrated video analytics and license plate recognition Communication with third-party systems using TCP signals or I/O modules (Moxa, Adam etc.) Easy handling and operation, also on touch-based systems or mobile devices Project experiences and certifications in the oil & gas-sector

Moxa's formal education and certification program launched
Moxa's formal education and certification program launched

The Moxa University aims to ensure smooth knowledge transfer across the supply and value chains The new Moxa University is a formal education and certification program to impart profound knowledge of network design, installation and maintenance to Moxa´s distribution partners. Moxa's increasingly strong footprint in industrial installations across Europe has been a major achievement, and a source of pride for Moxa´s European team. The reliable operation of these installations is Moxa´s primary objective. The Moxa University aims to ensure smooth knowledge transfer across the supply and value chains - from the developers of Moxa products to the customer´s network administrators. Formal training program that supports Moxa´s partners Industrial networks and their components, such as embedded computers, automation systems, or video surveillance devices are challenging microcosms far beyond the selection of reliable products. To anticipate and counteract their challenges, Steve Lin, Moxa Europe's General Manager, decided to establish a formal training program that supports Moxa´s partners, and ultimately Moxa´s customers, in achieving reliable industrial operation. "Moxa's aim has always been to provide reliable networks. Now we want to make sure that our customers learn how to convert our reliable products into reliable operation and consequently added value for themselves", says Steve Lin. “This is why we developed a training program that addresses our customer´s needs, and those of our partners, and our employees. They all can train to become `Moxa Certified Engineers´.” To ensure that the knowledge transfer can take place right where Moxa´s customers need it, Moxa reverts to their broad network of official distribution partners that all attend the annual Moxa Technical Certification trainings. The best of these Moxa Certified Engineers have recently undergone an additional train-the-trainer program. As a result, the first four graduates of the program, coming from Moxa distributors in Poland – Elmark Automation, Spain – Tempel Group, UK - IT4Automation & Croatia – Selmet, can now call themselves Moxa Certified Trainers and share their knowledge in so-called Moxa Training Centers. Centrally managed updated set of training materials The four distributors with Moxa Training Centers form the basis of a growing network of Moxa Authorised Training Centers situated in close proximity to Moxa´s European customers. They benefit from a centrally managed, continually updated set of training materials that include the experience and expert knowledge of the Moxa Certified Trainers all over the continent.

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