TDSi’s EXgarde V.4 access control software reflects the increasing need for advanced integration
TDSi’s EXgarde V.4 access control software reflects the increasing need for advanced integration

In the past the Access Control industry was a relatively straightforward one. Vendors supplied access control systems to installers who in turn organised and fitted solutions which were primarily concerned with securing doorways and controlling the flow of people traffic to restricted parts of the premises. But like most parts of the security industry, the Access Control sector has evolved and the industry is looking to expand their offering to add more value for money than ever before. For some this would have been unthinkable even a few years ago, but now successful companies have to think outside the traditional boundaries to meet the constantly evolving expectations of the market. Integration is a word that is mentioned time and time again in relation to Access Control – and with good reason! The IP revolution has become just as central to this sector as the rest of the security and wider technology world and has shaped the expectations of customers. Far from being a novelty, any system that doesn’t integrate with other IP systems at some level is now considered unusual. The move towards integration means that mutually communicative systems are essential, with the likes of Microsoft Active Directory becoming a central hub to all kinds of company systems from security to Human Resources and Facilities Management systems. As an extension to this, there are also demands for solutions that can still incorporate older legacy systems, which in all likelihood would never have been designed with this kind of integration in mind. For example, a company that has a large installation of analogue CCTV cameras (which may well still have a high degree of their effective lifecycle remaining) is unlikely to want to tear them all out in favour of more modern IP megapixel cameras, just for the sake of having new ones. Modern integrated systems can deal with these integration issues, but it is something that installers need to be sympathetic to, offering solutions that will save their customers wasting budget and will offer tailor-made, highly relevant solutions. The modern business world is largely responsible for driving the need for integration. Security and the ability to monitor and prove it are high priorities, but so is doing it effectively on tighter budgets. Rather than seeing it as a potential stumbling block, the Access Control industry needs to see the opportunities to offer customers a sizable and crucial part of the wider security offering. Schools are a good example of the need to integrate all the security systems to protect potentially vulnerable users. Modern educational establishments usually use a dedicated Schools Information Management Systems (SIMS) which gives a single point of administration and reference. With this at the heart of the establishment, the opportunities and benefits from creating a two way communication between the SIMS and the access control systems is obvious. For an installer there may be a temptation to sell the school a simple, standalone access system (particularly when budgets are under such close scrutiny), that offers lower upfront costs with a simpler installation process - yet there is a superb opportunity to offer a hard working solution that may cost more up front, but will really make good use of existing systems, offering far bigger rewards and helping to future-proof itself for considerably longer. The concept of thinking outside the box can apply on many levels. Access Control is closely linked to security and yet an integrated system can be as much a part of the management of the wider buildings’ control systems. If a people counter system can be used to ensure perimeter security access isn’t breached, then why not use it to control heating and ventilation? Closely controlling these systems minimises the waste of resources whilst ensuring users still get the services they need. Another area that is ripe for the help of Access Control as a value-add is Health and Safety. Being able to monitor the number of people who enter a controlled area also means a close eye can be kept on occupancy. Not only can this control the access of unauthorised people, it also monitors if a lone worker is present in a potentially hazardous area for example, alerting other members of the team that there may be a risk to their safety. Linked to this, it can also be an integral part of compliance, logging when staff are present in a hospital or a prison for example, integrating directly with the employment management system to provide highly accurate and secure information. The humble MIFARE card is another industry standard that can actually offer users a great degree of flexibility and empowerment beyond its Access Control role. The secure identity information held on the card can easily be accompanied by additional authentication details which are just as safe. Businesses or organisations that require a number of different secure functions (such as a university campus for example – which may offer library, gym membership and EPOS systems for retail) can use a MIFARE card as a single confirmation token. The appeal for our customers is that it reduces cost by utilising existing system investments to provide new services, whilst being relatively simple to implement. These examples of ‘Thinking outside the box’ could just be the tip of the iceberg as new technologies are waiting to grab the market. Near Field Communications are rapidly coming into focus as a security tool, building upon the popularity of smartphones and mobile devices on which they are deployed. This is an exciting technology as it utilises a ubiquitous everyday device to offer secure and convenient authentication which as mentioned above, can have a myriad of different uses well beyond the traditional access control arena. Biometric authentication is another area that is coming on in leaps and bounds. Being able to use a fingerprint, retina scan, facial recognition, sub dermal scan or even the analysis of the circulatory system, frees users from having to carry a token and yet offers even tighter levels of security. These levels of security will make it even easier to integrate different systems and the idea of limiting the potential of access control will seem like an anarchistic relic of a bygone age.  

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TDSi integrates access control with perimeter security systems
TDSi integrates access control with perimeter security systems

Specialist Access Control provider TDSi is bringing together the benefits of its entry control products with other perimeter security and building services controls, by offering full interactive systems integration. Earlier in the year TDSi launched a module for true TCP/IP integration from its EXgarde PRO software suite to alarm specialist Texecom’s Premier range of Intruder Alarm panels.  The solution allows full integration to other serial based devices such as IP CCTV, TDSi’s VUgarde NVR providing visual verification of Intruder Alarms through TDSi’s EXgarde PRO. John Davies, Managing Director of TDSi, comments “Integration with Texecom has enabled TDSi to augment EXgarde PRO into a more complete and truly integrated surveillance and security system at the TCP/IP level.  The user has full control, being able to arm and disarm zones to suit the use of the building, reducing the number of false alarms triggered, and providing visual verification of alarms.” Integration provides enhanced control and offers numerous benefits, such as the ability to activate and deactivate specific panels across multiple sites, as well as individual zones of a building and the ability to monitor all Intruder Alarm events which appear in the EXgarde Pro Alarm Manager Events panel.  If an alarm is activated, CCTV can be triggered to deliver both a real time image and a 15 second pre alarm condition recording to the control room.   The integration also means users benefit from a single point of administration with the ability to monitor a log of the intruder alarm system and also reduce the numbers of false alarm and the problems associated with this. This add-on to EXgarde continues TDSi’s overall commitment to making systems integration easier. The other key features of the system include the ability to log events in EXgarde, view the alarm zones’ status “armed”/”part-armed”/”disarmed” in EXgarde, remote arm/disarm from access events and part-arm zones from access events.  These flexible features allow users to avoid costly false alarms through arming only required zones of a building, also preventing unauthorised people from accessing certain zones. TDSi also recently announced the launch of the new Harmony Security Alliance, with even broader aims to ‘Collaborate, Innovate and Protect’ across the security product offering spectrum. TDSi is partnering with exterior detection equipment specialist GJD Manufacturing and specialist in highly efficient power supplies Elmdene International Ltd - along with Texecom, to offer installers and end users an unrivalled integrated service for all security and access control needs. The Harmony Alliance also means that the partner members will co-operate and develop on-going solutions that are designed to complement each other and work together effectively, whatever the specification of the overall system that is installed. For further details on TDSi and its range of access control solutions, please visit www.tdsi.co.uk or telephone +44 (0)1202 724 999. Installers and end users who would like more information on the Harmony Alliance, and have specific project requirements, can find further details on the new dedicated website: www.harmony-alliance.com.

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TDSi announces new MIFARE Programmer tool
TDSi announces new MIFARE Programmer tool

Access control specialist TDSi has launched its new MIFARE Programmer, which offers users the ability to specify their own sectors and keys on their MIFARE access cards. Together with the ability to re-configure TDSi's standard sector readers to any desired code (without the need for any other parties to be involved), the MIFARE Programmer ensures confidentiality of security data and access control.To make sure it doesn't inadvertently become a weak point of security itself, TDSi's MIFARE Programmer uses a highly secure user login to protect the ability to programme user cards from unauthorised users. Having control of MIFARE security details also offers a number of other key benefits:  Use pre-assigned sequential numbers - The MIFARE Programmer provides an effective method of card programming which eliminates potential duplication problems, Read and identify existing cards - users can identify existing cards and sector usage before migrating existing system cards, Log all cards issued - The MIFARE Programmer provides a history of cards which have been issued (for future reference), Multiple card number options - The user can utilise a unique number, custom number or CSN to program a sector, providing increased flexibility, Dual decode options - The MIFARE Programmer allows users to decode the new 7 byte UID using TDSi's format or NXP's format, for increased flexibility, Check which sectors are used - This built-in function allows users to check which sectors have already been used. This is ideal if you want to migrate existing MIFARE CSN cards that may be utilised for other aspects (such as cashless vending) to a more secure sector operation. TDSi's John Davies comments on the MIFARE Programmer, "For companies that need the highest levels of protection; the ability to protect your security codes across the board is a very attractive proposition. Being able to programme your own MIFARE cards and readers means you can close a potential gap in security that comes from pre-programmed systems. We believe this is a unique solution that offers real peace of mind. It has been developed from feedback we have had from installers and users, who advised that it would be highly desirable choice for both security and convenience."

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Access control software - Expert commentary

Protect physical assets from cyber-attacks
Protect physical assets from cyber-attacks

Recent cyber-attacks have disabled and even shut down physical assets. Robust foundational security and training staff, able to recognise an attack can help mitigate the threat, as ABB’s Rob Putman explains. Edge devices and data analytics As cyber security specialists, we must navigate an ever-changing threat landscape, one that is made even more complex by the increased interconnectivity between Operational Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT), as companies look to leverage edge devices and data analytics, as well as remote connectivity, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the threat surface evolves, the industry must guard against attacks on key physical infrastructure, carried out by a range of malicious actors, including nation states and criminals intent on blackmail. The chemicals sector, a high-value target for cyber-criminals Cyber-criminals view the chemicals sector, as a high-value target, because of the potential cost In 2017, not long after a ransomware attack that targeted Maersk, the world’s largest shipping firm, made the news around the world. Another cyber-attack, this time targeting physical industrial assets, generated fewer headlines, and yet could have resulted in both real, as well as financial, damage. Cyber-criminals view the chemicals sector, as a high-value target, because of the potential cost, both financial and reputational, to the operator, should production be interrupted or stopped entirely. Cyber security vulnerabilities put physical assets at risk The attack in question, a ‘Triton’ custom malware attack on a petro-chemical facility in Saudi Arabia, targeted a safety system, taking over system controllers. Bugs in the code triggered an emergency shutdown, but could have led to the release of toxic and explosive gases. It was a vivid reminder of how cyber security vulnerabilities are increasingly putting companies’ key physical assets at risk. Two more-recent high-profile incidents illustrate my point. In February, a Florida water treatment plant was hacked. The malicious actor remotely accessed the system for three to five minutes, during which time they opened various functions on the screen, including one that controls the amount of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the water. The hacker changed the NaOH from about 100 parts per million to 11,100 parts per million, which could have resulted in a mass poisoning event. Colonial Pipeline cyber-attack incident Then, in May, the Colonial Pipeline system that originates in Houston, Texas and carries gasoline, and jet fuel, suffered a ransomware attack. Using a VPN, hackers targeted back-office IT systems, forcing Colonial to shut down IT hosts and network infrastructure, severing communication with those OT systems that are responsible for communicating ‘transactional data’ associated with fuel delivery. In this instance, a single compromised password disrupted Colonial’s ability to invoice its customers. This dependency on OT data stopped pipeline and business operations, and the company was elected to pay the hackers an initial ransom of US$ 4.4 million, in order to restore operations. The Colonial attack was multi-dimensional, in that it not only impacted Colonial’s business, but also the wider US economy and national security, since the pipeline transports nearly half of the east coast's fuel supplies. Outdated IT system elevates physical risk The increased interconnectivity between IT and OT can also create vulnerabilit Attacks such as these prove that, armed with little more than a laptop, an email account and access to the dark web, determined hackers can cause disproportionate damage to physical infrastructure. As mentioned at the outset, the increased interconnectivity between IT and OT can also create vulnerability. Producers often want to know: Is it risky to connect a production asset or their operational environment to the Cloud? My answer is, if you do so without having done any risk audits around people, processes and technology, or without enhancing and maintaining that environment, then yes, that is risky. For example, we often observe that the life cycle of a production asset far outlasts the IT systems that are used to run it. Take a cement kiln. Several generations of plant operators may have come and gone, but that asset may still run, using legacy software, such as Windows XP and why not? Need to replace aging distributed control systems Well, that’s fine, if you are not concerned about having that asset compromised, and all that entails. A ‘flat’ IT network, an aging distributed control system, and machines with legacy versions of Microsoft Windows, all these elements, which are still commonplace in many industries, make it much easier for attackers to find and infiltrate a company, without needing sophisticated tools. The age-old mantra of not interfering with a piece of equipment or software that appears to be working, often applies to the individual assets. For example that cement kiln that are still controlled by the same Windows XP-based control software. However, if we’re honest, things have changed quite a bit, not because something was broken, but because innovation came in. That same kiln control system is most likely connected to other systems, than when first commissioned and that opens it to exposure to threats that it was never designed for. The human element There is a misconception that IoT-connected devices can open companies to risk There is a misconception that IoT-connected devices can open companies to risk, but many recent, high-profile cyber-attacks have been conducted from a laptop, by hacking someone’s VPN, or are a simple phishing/malware attack. In all these cases, the human element is partly to blame. Take the Florida attack. The compromised computer at the water treatment facility was reportedly running an outdated Windows 7 operating system and staff all used the same password, in order to gain remote access via the Teamviewer app, which the hacker was then able to use. Physical and human assets, key to robust cyber security Discussion on the best way to mitigate the threat is often framed solely around specific technical solutions and ignores the fact that robust foundational cyber security is really driven by two very different, but equally important, types of capital: physical assets (e.g. production machinery), and human assets. The truth is that smart digital software and industry-renowned cyber security applications, while critical, are in many cases, only as good as the weakest human link in the chain. Industry would, therefore, do well to ask itself the following question: Do we have a security problem, or a complacency problem? At this juncture, it is important to point out that the majority of companies that ABB works with, are at least aware of the threat posed by cyber attackers, and the potential impact of an attack, on their revenues, reputation and bottom line. User error and human-generated exposures Making sure staff are aware of the threat and training them to respond properly, if they are targeted, is vital However, user error and human-generated exposures are where most of these attacks occur. Those human failures are mostly not due to malicious intent from employees, but to the lack of training of the employees on secure behavior. Making sure staff are aware of the threat and training them to respond properly, if they are targeted, is vital. However, there are also age demographics at play here. Much of the operations employee base is heading towards retirement and often, there is no plan or ability to backfill these people. Need to invest in new digital and automated technologies If you think you don't have enough people now, in order to stay on top of basic care and feeding of the OT environment, with regards to security, what is that going to be like in 20 years? For this reason, there must be a major industry reset, when it comes to its workforce. Companies must invest in new digital and automated technologies, not only to ensure that they stay ahead of the curve and mitigate risk, but also to attract the next generation of digitally literate talent. Robust cyber security is built on solid foundations When we talk about foundational cyber security, we mean fundamentals, such as patching, malware protection, high-fidelity system backups, an up-to-date anti-virus system, and other options, such as application allow-listing and asset inventory. These basic controls can help companies understand their system setup and the potential threats, identify vulnerabilities, and assess their risk exposure. The Pareto principle states that around 80% of consequences come from 20% of the causes. In the context of cyber security, that means 80% of exposure to risk comes from 20% of the lack of security. If companies do the foundational things right, they can manage out a significant amount of this risk. Importance of maintaining and upgrading security controls However, having basic security controls, such as anti-virus software in place, is just the first step on that journey. Equally important is having someone within the organisation, with the requisite skill set, or the extra labour bandwidth, to operate, maintain and update those security controls, as they evolve. Educating, training and recruiting existing employees, and the next generation of talent, along with forging partnerships with trusted technology providers, will ensure that industry can leverage the latest digital technologies, in order to drive business value, and secure physical assets against cyber-attacks.

The robotic transformation of the security industry
The robotic transformation of the security industry

The COVID-19 pandemic is only accelerating the expansion of Automation, Robotics, Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), and changing how people live their daily lives. This expansion leads the way with technologies that are developed to solve problems, improve operations, streamline processes and assist people, to focus on learning new skills, creativity, and imagination. Transformation of the physical security industry One of the latest industries to be permanently transformed is physical security. The era of utilising security cameras is slowly changing into more advanced and more efficient technological applications - security robotic solutions. SMP Robotics is a California-based company, which is a pioneer in developing robotic technologies, powered by AI, to assist, improve and deliver on new expectations in today’s world. One of their services is smart surveillance systems. This represents a proactive approach to security. The company, SMP Robotics’ Founder and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Leo Ryzhenko, stated “Autonomous robotic technologies will become a driving force in future security solutions.” Robotics and AI in autonomous security solutions The robots can patrol 24/7, counteracting intrusion and communicating via voice message with guards The company uses robotics and AI technology to implement autonomous security solutions, which reduce liability and overhead, as well as improving the quality of services. Robotic guards are capable of patrolling all types of facilities, in both urban and rural contexts. The robots can patrol 24/7, counteracting intrusion and communicating via voice message with guards. The inspection robots, deployed by SMP Robotics, are easily integrated with many existing security technologies, armed with obstacle avoidance and anti-collision measures, automatically recharge, and can recognise faces up to 50 metres. As the world grows increasingly complex, technology like this is essential to ensure safety for all. AI-enabled autonomous video monitoring ground vehicles The advancements in technological breakthroughs of SMP Robotics position the company and its AI-powered, autonomous video monitoring ground vehicles, to be the most adaptable to any industry, cost-effective for clients’ business needs, in providing various types of services from public safety, crime prevention, to asset protection and physical security. SMP Robotics continues to implement new innovative solutions and groundbreaking technologies in its latest generation of autonomous models. Currently, many were already deployed or in a process to be delivered to a number of key clients, in various industries throughout the globe, from oil & gas, nuclear power plants to data centers, healthcare facilities, and amusement parks. Smart security robots Tal Turner, the Vice President (VP) of Business Development and Partnerships, SMP Robotics, said “We provide autonomous, artificial intelligence, all-weather, all-surface, smart security robots that are turnkey and operate independently on their own, using real-time obstacle avoidance, face recognition, and other cutting-edge technological advancements.” According to Coherent Market Insights, the Robots as a Service (RaaS) market direction will grow by 15.9% by 2028 and reach the threshold of 41.3 billion dollars. SMP Robotics stands at the forefront of the security robotic revolution, making an impactful change to make the world a safer place.

The EU called for a ban on police use of facial recognition but not commercial use. Why?
The EU called for a ban on police use of facial recognition but not commercial use. Why?

Recently, the European Parliament called for a ban on police use of facial recognition. In the US, too, some cities have restricted police use of facial recognition. The first question that comes to mind is - why ban police from using technology that is allowed to private companies? Point of difference The key difference between the way police use facial recognition and the way commercial facial recognition products work is that: The police get a picture of a suspect from a crime scene and want to find out: "Who is the person in the picture?" That requires as wide a database as possible. Optimally - photos and identities of all the people in the world. Commercial facial recognition products such as those used by supermarkets, football stadiums, or casinos answer different questions: "Is the person in the picture on the employees' list? Is the person in the picture on a watch-list of known shoplifters?" To answer these questions doesn't require a broad database but rather a defined list of employees or a watch-list of specific people against whom there is an arrest warrant or a restraining order. Use of facial recognition AnyVision helps organisations leverage facial recognition ethically to identify known persons of interest "Facial Recognition Apps Should Be Provided to the Police with an Empty Database". This is exactly the subject of the open letter sent by AnyVision, to the British Biometrics and Surveillance Camera Commissioner, Prof. Fraser Sampson, titled: "Facial Recognition Apps Should Be Provided to the Police with an Empty Database". AnyVision recently raised $235M from Softbank and another leading VCs is a visual AI platform company that helps organisations across the globe leverage facial recognition ethically to identify known persons of interest, including shoplifters, felons, and security threats. Ethical use of facial recognition AnyVision CEO Avi Golan wrote, "The ethical use of facial recognition is a thorny one and requires a nuanced discussion. Part of that discussion has to explain how facial recognition works, but, just as important, the discussion must also involve how the technology is used by police departments and what checks and balances are built into their processes.” “We recommend building their watchlists from the ground up based on known felons, persons of interest, and missing persons. Some facial recognition solution providers have scrapped billions of photos and identities of people from social networks, usually without their consent." "Unfortunately, this method of facial recognition has justifiably angered privacy groups and data protection agencies around the globe and damaged the public trust in accuracy and reliability of facial recognition systems.” Preventing invasion of citizen’s privacy We believe an unjustified invasion of citizens' privacy can be prevented, false arrests can be reduced" “We believe that lists of suspects should be limited and justified. In this way, unjustified invasion of citizens' privacy can be prevented, false arrests can be reduced and public confidence in technology can be increased.” Golan added: "AnyVision is willing to share its industry insights and best practices from our vast research experience with leading global players, including name-brand retailers, global hospitality and entertainment companies, and law enforcement agencies from around the world.” Balancing public order and crime prevention “If the regulations set forth by Surveillance Camera Code of Practice are committed to the principles outlined above, then law enforcement agencies can strike the right balance between the need to maintain public order and prevent crime with the rights of every person to privacy and non-discrimination before the law." Recently Clearview AI CEO told Wired; the company has scraped 10 billion photos from the web - 3 times more than was previously known.

Latest TDSi news

TDSi welcomes new placement student to its software development team
TDSi welcomes new placement student to its software development team

Integrated security manufacturer TDSi announces the arrival of its latest student placement, Vlad Radoi. Vlad has joined the company’s Software Development Team for a twelve-month placement as part of his BSc (Hons) in Software Engineering studies at Bournemouth University. Supporting placement students Vlad is the latest in an ongoing line of TDSi placement students, as Managing Director John Davies elaborated, “As a business, we have a long heritage of supporting apprenticeships and placement students across all parts of our business, so we are always delighted to support a new student.” “Software Development is a key role within the access control and integrated security industry and one which is at the heart of what TDSi does, so Vlad is exactly the type of passionate young trainee professional we look to attract and support, as they enter the world of business as well as the technology of security.” About Vlad Radoi Vlad is looking forward to working directly with the TDSi team Originally from Romania (although he has lived in the UK for over 10 years) and a fan of the McLaren Formula One racing team and Arsenal Football Club, Vlad is looking forward to working directly with the TDSi team, as he stated, “Being at Bournemouth University has been fun and weird at the same time, for the last year and a half my experience has largely been online via Zoom and Teams, due to pandemic restrictions.” “However, I am excited to be getting first-hand experience in a commercial setting with TDSi, there is much to learn, and it will kickstart my career as a software engineer.” Gaining new experience Having started with TDSi at the beginning of August, Vlad is already working closely with the Software Development Team, helping it to enhance its GARDiS Access Control software for example. “At the moment, I am working with the GARDiS API, and whilst it is complex, I enjoy studying the intricacies of it. This role gives me lots of experience working with new frameworks and language, as well as learning how software development works in the real world.” Vlad is looking forward to the year ahead and added, “TDSi is an important player in the security and access control industry, and I look forward to learning a lot more about the company, its software, and software development as a whole.”

What career opportunities await the next generation in security?
What career opportunities await the next generation in security?

A new generation of security professional is waiting in the wings. They will be faced with unprecedented challenges, as they seek to transform the security marketplace to the ‘next level’. Technology changes ensure the market will be very different 10 years from now and the fresh labour pool will need to be able to meet the host of new challenges. We asked our Expert Panel Roundtable: What exciting career opportunities in the security industry await the next generation?

TDSi GARDiS software now features full integration with Hikvision’s face recognition terminals and ANPR cameras
TDSi GARDiS software now features full integration with Hikvision’s face recognition terminals and ANPR cameras

Integrated security manufacturer, TDSi is pleased to announce that its powerful GARDiS access management software now supports full integration with Hikvision’s face recognition terminals and ANPR cameras. TDSi - Hikvision partnership John Davies, the Managing Director of TDSi commented, “Integration with Hikvision’s latest generation of intelligent cameras is part of TDSi’s ongoing mission, to ensure our powerful integrated access control solutions work directly with the best third-party products on the market. Our GARDiS software is perfectly placed to help end users cope and deal with rapidly changing, and evolving needs.” He adds, “Our ethos is that customers must be able to choose the right components for their security network, to meet their specific needs and budget, with the whole solution overseen by our powerful, centralised, but flexible GARDiS software.” GARDiS access management software TDSi’s GARDiS software delivers quick and simple, but powerful integration with Hikvision’s face recognition terminal Providing options for Wiegand and Clock & Data protocol inputs, TDSi’s GARDiS software delivers quick and simple, but powerful integration with Hikvision’s face recognition terminal, and the wider security network. This includes integration with ASSA ABLOY Aperio and SimonsVoss SmartIntego wireless locks, along with a wide choice of intruder alarms and CCTV systems. GARDiS includes Lift Control, Area Occupancy, and ANPR, which are all designed to assist with not only security, but also ongoing safeguarding of health requirements. Integration with Hikvision’s face recognition terminals Integration with Hikvision’s face recognition terminals adds considerable functionality to any security network, with features including: Temperature measuring range - 30 °C to 45 °C (86 °F to 113 °F), with an accuracy of 0.1 ° C, deviation of ± 0.5 °C Facemask wearing alert Multiple authentication modes (card and temperature, face and temperature, card and face and temperature,) Triggered voice prompt, when detecting abnormal temperature Configurable door status (open/close), when detecting abnormal temperature 6000 face capacity, 6000 card capacity and 100,000 event capacity Six attendance statuses - Check-in, check out, break-in, break out, overtime in and overtime out Watchdog design and tamper function Rapid deployment of security systems John Davies adds, “The last 18 months has demonstrated the need for security and safety systems that can be rapidly deployed and installed, with the flexibility to evolve and grow to meet future user requirements.” He concludes, “Be it individual end-user projects or the delivery of rapidly expanding Security-as-a-Service (SaaS) solutions, the GARDiS integration with Hikvision’s systems is a perfect example of the potential for modern systems to work closely together and deliver potentially life-saving benefits.”

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