Editor’s picks

Should ‘Made in China’ be seen as a negative in security systems and products?
Should ‘Made in China’ be seen as a negative in security systems and products?

In today’s global economy, goods are manufactured all over the world and shipped to customers thousands of miles away. Where goods are manufactured thus becomes a mere detail. However, in the case of “Made in China”, the location of a manufacturer has become more high-profile and possibly more urgent. The U.S. government recently banned the use in government installations of video system components from two Chinese manufacturers, presumably because of cybersecurity concerns. A...

Why self-service kiosks are a target for cyber attacks
Why self-service kiosks are a target for cyber attacks

Today, customers are demanding immediacy, personalisation and seamless services from their providers and our desire for instant gratification means that those servicing the public need to provide easy, fast, smooth and continuous ways to meet customer expectations. This is where interactive kiosks can really help organisations to deliver a high level of service in an easy to use, automated way. In recent years, kiosks have fast gained popularity, not only because they enhance customer satisfac...

Mobile and cloud technologies sharpen organisations’ emergency response strategies
Mobile and cloud technologies sharpen organisations’ emergency response strategies

There’s only so much a corporation can do to counteract the threat of a major incident. You can ask everyone to be vigilant and to report anything suspicious, but you cannot stop someone intent on deliberately starting a fire, threatening a work colleague with a knife or something much worse. And of course, most businesses recognise that even routine events – such as burst pipes, IT system failures, extreme weather event or power outages – can have significant consequences unle...

Intellectual honesty: the growth of Cobalt Robotics and robots in security
Intellectual honesty: the growth of Cobalt Robotics and robots in security

The best route to greater adoption of robotics in the field of physical security is intellectual honesty, says Travis Deyle, CEO and co-founder of Cobalt Robotics. “Robots are not a panacea, so we must be clear and honest about capabilities and use cases,” he says. “If you are dishonest, people will lose faith. We must have clear expectations about what’s feasible today and possible tomorrow.” The robotics tide is turning in the security market, which is notoriousl...

Round table discussions

Does “security technology” cover the broader application possibilities of today’s systems?
Does “security technology” cover the broader application possibilities of today’s systems?

The concept of how security systems can contribute to the broader business goals of a company is not new. It seems we have been talking about benefits of security systems beyond “just” security for more than a decade. Given the expanding role of technologies in the market, including video and access control, at what point is the term “security” too restrictive to accurately describe what our industry does? We asked the Expert Panel Roundtable for their responses to this premise: Is the description “security technology” too narrow given the broader application possibilities of today’s systems? Why?

Should ‘Made in China’ be seen as a negative in security systems and products?
Should ‘Made in China’ be seen as a negative in security systems and products?

In today’s global economy, goods are manufactured all over the world and shipped to customers thousands of miles away. Where goods are manufactured thus becomes a mere detail. However, in the case of “Made in China”, the location of a manufacturer has become more high-profile and possibly more urgent. The U.S. government recently banned the use in government installations of video system components from two Chinese manufacturers, presumably because of cybersecurity concerns. A simmering trade war between China and the United States also emphasises other concerns related to Chinese manufacturing. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: Should "Made in China" be seen as a negative in the video surveillance marketplace? Why or why not?

Which segments are under-served in the physical security industry?
Which segments are under-served in the physical security industry?

Physical security technologies operate successfully in many different markets, but in which markets do they fall short? Physical security is a difficult challenge that can sometime defy the best efforts of manufacturers, integrators and end users. This is especially the case in some of the more problematic markets and applications where even the best technology has to offer may not be good enough, or could it be that the best technology has not been adequately applied? We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable to reflect on instances when the industry may fall short: Which segments of the physical security industry are most under-served and why?

Case studies

ASSA ABLOY’s CLIQ electronic locking system secures entrances for Creval bank in Italy
ASSA ABLOY’s CLIQ electronic locking system secures entrances for Creval bank in Italy

Retail banking combines a demand for high security with complex workflows. Staff need efficient access. Facility managers need the flexibility to design access permissions around individual needs, so not everyone can access every area whenever they choose. Nobody wants to carry or track large numbers of keys. These were the requirements, managers of Creval — a regional bank in Italy — faced when seeking an alternative to a mechanical master-key system. Creval needed new access control devices to become an integral part of a security system for assets and people with the highest level of protection. They sought locks to offer a durable, secure and flexible alternative to standard mechanical security. They found an easy, electronic way to administer a powerful, user-friendly system based on battery-powered physical keys and secure, advanced microelectronics. Flexible high-security locking Staff carry a single, battery-powered eCLIQ key, programmed with only the right preauthorised access permissionsCreval chose eCLIQ key-based wireless access control for its banking premises. Bank doors across the Lombardy region are guarded by more than 30 durable eCLIQ cylinders, putting Creval managers in complete control of entrance security. eCLIQ is a scalable electronic extension of the CLIQ access control system deployed in critical infrastructure sites across Europe. Cylinders are fully electronic, protected against manipulation and with 128-bit AES encryption built into both lock and key microelectronics. Staff carry a single, battery-powered eCLIQ key, programmed with only the right preauthorised access permissions. Time-limited access rights Creval’s security manager is now able to grant access based on scheduled times and specific doors, and right down to the level of the individual site user. It is also straightforward to set time-limited access rights for a user key, increasing security if a key is lost. Audit trails and event logs are collected to the same, fine-grained degree. Key management is easy with software operated from a local PC or securely on the web via a standard browser. In the unlikely event a key is misplaced, Creval administrators simply delete its validity from the system. “We are satisfied with the results of the new access control system,” says Claudio Brisia, Logical Security Manager at Creval headquarters in Sondrio.

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