Editor’s picks

Does “security technology” cover the broader application possibilities of today’s systems?
Does “security technology” cover the broader application possibilities of today’s systems?

The concept of how security systems can contribute to the broader business goals of a company is not new. It seems we have been talking about benefits of security systems beyond “just” security for more than a decade. Given the expanding role of technologies in the market, including video and access control, at what point is the term “security” too restrictive to accurately describe what our industry does? We asked the Expert Panel Roundtable for their responses to this p...

Why moving to a risk-based approach helps business
Why moving to a risk-based approach helps business

Today’s security leaders encounter many challenges. They have to operate with reduced budgets and face challenging and evolving risks on a daily basis. Security leaders are often ignored and only called upon when needed or in disaster situations. Many don’t have an ongoing relationship with the C-suite because the C-suite doesn’t understand the value they bring to the whole business. In order to resolve these challenges, a security leader can apply a risk-based approach to the...

Why regional? Inside ADT's mergers and acquisitions of US security integrators
Why regional? Inside ADT's mergers and acquisitions of US security integrators

ADT Inc.’s acquisition of Red Hawk Fire & Security, Boca Raton, Fla., is the latest move in ADT Commercial’s strategy to buy up security integrator firms around the country and grow their footprint. In addition to the Red Hawk acquisition, announced in mid-October, ADT has acquired more than a half-dozen security system integration firms in the last year or so.  Here’s a quick rundown of integrator companies acquired by ADT: Protec, a Pacific Northwest commerc...

Shifting focus: Internet of Things (IoT) from the security manufacturer's perspective
Shifting focus: Internet of Things (IoT) from the security manufacturer's perspective

The term Internet of Things (IoT) has almost been beaten to death at this point, as more and more security integrators, manufacturers and customers take advantage of the ability to increase connectivity between devices (and therefore take on the dangers this introduces). But the methods by which we interact with the IoT and protect its devices are still catching up, which means security manufacturers must take part in shifting their focus toward safeguarding data, engaging in vulnerability test...

Round table discussions

How can the physical security market promote better employee retention?
How can the physical security market promote better employee retention?

Employee turnover is a problem for many companies, especially among younger employees who have not developed the philosophy of employer loyalty that was common in previous generations. Nowadays, changing jobs is the norm. The idea of spending decades working for a single employer seems almost quaint in today’s economy. However, excessive employee turnover can be expensive for employers, who are looking for ways to keep their brightest and best employees happily toiling away as long as possible. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: How can the physical security market promote better employee retention in a competitive employment environment? 

Does “security technology” cover the broader application possibilities of today’s systems?
Does “security technology” cover the broader application possibilities of today’s systems?

The concept of how security systems can contribute to the broader business goals of a company is not new. It seems we have been talking about benefits of security systems beyond “just” security for more than a decade. Given the expanding role of technologies in the market, including video and access control, at what point is the term “security” too restrictive to accurately describe what our industry does? We asked the Expert Panel Roundtable for their responses to this premise: Is the description “security technology” too narrow given the broader application possibilities of today’s systems? Why?

Should ‘Made in China’ be seen as a negative in security systems and products?
Should ‘Made in China’ be seen as a negative in security systems and products?

In today’s global economy, goods are manufactured all over the world and shipped to customers thousands of miles away. Where goods are manufactured thus becomes a mere detail. However, in the case of “Made in China”, the location of a manufacturer has become more high-profile and possibly more urgent. The U.S. government recently banned the use in government installations of video system components from two Chinese manufacturers, presumably because of cybersecurity concerns. A simmering trade war between China and the United States also emphasises other concerns related to Chinese manufacturing. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: Should "Made in China" be seen as a negative in the video surveillance marketplace? Why or why not?

Case studies

ASSA ABLOY’s CLIQ electronic locking system secures entrances for Creval bank in Italy
ASSA ABLOY’s CLIQ electronic locking system secures entrances for Creval bank in Italy

Retail banking combines a demand for high security with complex workflows. Staff need efficient access. Facility managers need the flexibility to design access permissions around individual needs, so not everyone can access every area whenever they choose. Nobody wants to carry or track large numbers of keys. These were the requirements, managers of Creval — a regional bank in Italy — faced when seeking an alternative to a mechanical master-key system. Creval needed new access control devices to become an integral part of a security system for assets and people with the highest level of protection. They sought locks to offer a durable, secure and flexible alternative to standard mechanical security. They found an easy, electronic way to administer a powerful, user-friendly system based on battery-powered physical keys and secure, advanced microelectronics. Flexible high-security locking Staff carry a single, battery-powered eCLIQ key, programmed with only the right preauthorised access permissionsCreval chose eCLIQ key-based wireless access control for its banking premises. Bank doors across the Lombardy region are guarded by more than 30 durable eCLIQ cylinders, putting Creval managers in complete control of entrance security. eCLIQ is a scalable electronic extension of the CLIQ access control system deployed in critical infrastructure sites across Europe. Cylinders are fully electronic, protected against manipulation and with 128-bit AES encryption built into both lock and key microelectronics. Staff carry a single, battery-powered eCLIQ key, programmed with only the right preauthorised access permissions. Time-limited access rights Creval’s security manager is now able to grant access based on scheduled times and specific doors, and right down to the level of the individual site user. It is also straightforward to set time-limited access rights for a user key, increasing security if a key is lost. Audit trails and event logs are collected to the same, fine-grained degree. Key management is easy with software operated from a local PC or securely on the web via a standard browser. In the unlikely event a key is misplaced, Creval administrators simply delete its validity from the system. “We are satisfied with the results of the new access control system,” says Claudio Brisia, Logical Security Manager at Creval headquarters in Sondrio.

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