Borer introduces FUSION Access Control using PoE TCP/IP over existing traditional legacy systems
Borer introduces FUSION Access Control using PoE TCP/IP over existing traditional legacy systems

Nearly all access systems need a mains power outlet at the door. Fitting a mains spur for a new build can cost from £60, while retrofits can often cost more than £300. Most access control systems require cabinets to house power supplies and electronic circuit boards. These are often mounted above the door or in the ceiling void.Borer's new FUSION Access Control installation needs less hardware. A typical installation consists of a Borer smartcard reader, lock manager and electric lock all fitted at door handle height. The credit-card sized lock manager is mounted inside the Push-To-Exit switch or surface mounting, and is used to perform multiple functions including managing the power to the strike and monitor door status settings.FUSION needs less equipment to be installed and has fewer cables to terminate. You don't need mains power outlets at every door so you don't need a qualified electrician. As all equipment is mounted at door handle height, it can be safety installed without using ladders thereby eliminating the dangers and paperwork associated with working at heights.Many access control systems use traditional cable architecture to connect a chain of access doors to a PC or the LAN via an RS485 to Ethernet converted. The data cable is run from door to door in a daisy chain style. In contrast, FUSION uses standard CAT5e network cable. Each door has its own cable connection to a network bridge. More cable is needed, but CAT5e cable costs a third of the price of RS485 cable.Up to 80% of service calls are often resolved by simple power resetting equipment. FUSION has remote diagnostic and repair facilities built into the access control system. This enables many service tasks to be undertaken via remote control over the internet, using a secure connection. This can significantly impact on service overheads.FUSION supports power and data delivery over CAT5e network cable. This allows the system administrator or service provider to monitor, manage and control door access readers, attendance terminals and security input panels. In this way many basic faults can be resolved without having to call out a service engineer.FUSION can also significantly impact on your energy costs. Borer's door installation consisting of an electric strike and combined smartcard reader/controller using Power over Ethernet technology consumes only 3 watts, costing between £3 and £5 per annum for energy.

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CTC: A chip that speaks many languages
CTC: A chip that speaks many languages

At the start of June, LEGIC Identsystems AG announced the launch of its first cross-standard transponder chip – CTC for short. The CTC4096-MP410 supports the prime RF standard of LEGIC as well as of LEGIC advant (ISO 14443A) and brings new possibilities for card manufacturers and end users. At the end of the financial year, LEGIC Identsystems AG was able to announce the launch of the first family of multi-RF transponder chips. CTC are innovative in that they are both LEGIC advant and prime transponders at the same time. The CTC4096-MP410 has a 4kb memory; 3kb for the LEGIC advant memory and 1kb for the LEGIC prime memory. A LEGIC prime reader can access the latter without additional tools. A LEGIC advant reader can access both the LEGIC advant memory as well as the prime memory. The first of a multi-lingual family “With CTC technology, we are introducing a family of multi-RF transponder chips, which offers an easy solution to integrate several RF standards”, explains Reinhard Kalla, Vice President Product Marketing & New Business at LEGIC Identsystems AG. “CTC is possibly the first solution of this kind that operates faultlessly.” Future versions of CTC4096-MP410 will be based on the same technology platform and allow communication in several RF standards.  Considerable advantages for manufacturers and end users For manufacturers of storage media, the CTC generation signifies simplified card design: until now, communication in different RF standards required two chips each with an antenna; now only one chip with antenna is required, thus saving on costs. “CTC users will be the ones to reap the most benefits”, emphasises Kalla. CTC allows to use one card within a mixed reader infrastructure. the migration from LEGIC prime to LEGIC advant to take place in steps or selectively. For example, the prime user can convert selected fields with very high security requirements individually to LEGIC advant, without having to change the entire system. Or, he can implement the migration from prime to LEGIC advant in several steps. “With CTC, we give our end customers full flexibility in developing their system”, sums up Kalla. In operation soon The CTC4096-MP410 has already been thoroughly tested and is on the way to being put into practical application. For one major customer, several hundred thousands of pieces had already been produced at the time of the launch.  Successful market penetration is therefore not an issue.

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LEGIC advant 4000 reader chip generation fulfils high functional requirements
LEGIC advant 4000 reader chip generation fulfils high functional requirements

The market for contactless identification technology is constantly moving. Requirements for advanced security and reliability are increasing, along with demands for comfortable and internationally flexible use. Manufacturers of readers and credentials, along with systems integrators, require technologies that fulfil high functional requirements and user-related criteria to the same extent. The new LEGIC SM-4200 reader chip rises to this challenge. The established variety of supported applications, such as access control, time & attendance, offline locks, IT access or cashless payments, is only the basis. Due to the extremely small size (8 x 8 mm) and the compact design of the new LEGIC reader chip, manufacturers are offered even more flexibility in developing their applications. A much longer battery lifetime also makes the chip attractive for offline applications such as lockers or furniture locks. Open technology platform The challenges are even more demanding when you consider the complex system of different technologies, manufacturers and industrial standards that characterises almost all modern security solutions. Intelligent basic technology, as used by SM-4200, is open to a variety of standards and transponder types, has a high level of interoperability and can be easily integrated into existing installations. Security standards are also increasing on a daily basis. It is therefore more and more important for a technology platform in the field of secure personal identification to include an encryption package that can be upgraded on demand. This openness not only guarantees high protection of investments, but also ensures that installations always comply with the most up-to-date security standards. Setting trends The new development of the LEGIC advant SM-4200 reader chip is perfectly in line with the trend for compact, interoperable and energy-efficient solutions, which can be flexibly integrated into existing infrastructure. Ultimately, the end user's comfort is enhanced through the use of flexible and versatile reading technology.

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LEGIC advant 4000: the reader generation with MIFARE interoperability
LEGIC advant 4000: the reader generation with MIFARE interoperability

The new reader chip SM-4500 and the new OS-4000 V2.0 make the LEGIC advant 4000 series the most versatile reader generation of LEGIC. The great novelty of the SM-4500 is the initialisation function, which enables the creation and the management of segments on LEGIC transponders. With the installation of OS-4000 V2.0 the complete LEGIC advant 4000 series further supports common third party transponders, e.g. MIFARE Classic und MIFARE DESFire. This feature opens up a bigger market for readers. Through its compact design, its low-power consumption and a versatile and simple application interface LEGIC advant 4000 based readers integrate themselves in a wide variety of applications. Creation and management of segments with the SM-4500 The new SM-4500 includes the complete function set to create and manage segments on transponder chips. Thus the initialisation of smart cards becomes easier and the management of a system is more comfortable than ever before. Interoperability with MIFARE transponders LEGIC advant 4000 reader modules support all common RF standards and can therefore be used in an extreme wide variety of installations. With the introduction of the OS-4000 V2.0, this key feature is further enhanced – so that, besides the RF standards, the required cryptographic functions for the complete MIFARE transponder family are supported by LEGIC advant 4000 readers. New features and a full backward compatibility The coexistence of LEGIC advant 4000 readers in existing installations is secured by a full backward compatibility with all existing LEGIC products. The SM-4500 is further pin-compatible with the SM-4200 and thus integrates itself easily in existing designs. New installations benefit additionally from the extended possibilities and the higher efficiency – which is also prepared for future challenges. Suitable for all applications The LEGIC advant 4000 series features an extremely compact design and low-power consumption. A smooth integration in readers, easy deployments with battery-powered applications and a simple usage of the smart card technology offer attractive designs, new applications and a unique comfort for operators and users.

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Access control systems & kits - Expert commentary

What about electronic door locks with remote control?
What about electronic door locks with remote control?

Most consumers are enjoying the convenience brought by electronic locks. With the existence of electronic locks, people no longer need to be restricted by keys. There are a variety of unlocking methods and more convenient remote control unlocking options. Suppose, you are going on vacation, and with the presence of an electronic lock, you can easily enter your house with your babysitter, without a spare key. Of course, not only smart homes, but also some infrastructure and commercial buildings are enjoying the convenience, brought by electronic locks. Passive electronic lock access control system This article will introduce a smart electronic lock used in the infrastructure industry, named passive electronic lock access control system. In traditional manufacturing, mechanical locks are commonly used in all walks of life, to protect the safety of property and facilities. However, the mechanical lock has caused many practical problems in the long-term application. For example, the keys are duplicated randomly, the unlocking authority cannot be controlled, the user's operation records cannot be known, and the remote control is not possible. Imagine that if you are in a remote telecom base station, it happens that you have the wrong key in your hand and cannot open the front door. In such a situation, this lock, maybe the worst scenario. In some industries, with a wide scope and large working area, more attention must be paid to access control systems Therefore, in some industries, with a wide scope and large working area, more attention must be paid to access control systems. In some outdoor scenarios, such as base stations and electric power cabinets, the requirements for access control systems are quite strict. Due to the particularity of its environment, ordinary power-based access control systems will no longer be applicable. Therefore, the emergence of passive access control systems has solved these problems. Electronic locks offer intelligent management function Based on years of in-depth field research, Vanma has developed the Vanma passive electronic lock access control system, based on the current situation of the industry. This system is different from other electronic lock systems, as it integrates the advantages of both mechanical locks and electronic locks. It not only has the simplicity of mechanical locks, but also has the intelligent management function of electronic locks. The term ‘passive’ of passive electronic locks means that no power is needed. Passive electronic locks have the same appearance as ordinary mechanical locks, so they can be installed anywhere, just like common mechanical locks. They also have a variety of practical functions of electronic locks. Authorised remote access control The Vanma management software allows security managers to assign access rights to specific areas, for different technical personnel. In order to facilitate real-time access control, the electronic key can be used in conjunction with the mobile phone app, in order to send information about its access rights to the technicians, in real time. Vanma management software can provide access to all operations performed by technicians Vanma management software can provide access to all operations performed by technicians, including complete audit reports. Access attempts outside the specified time range or outside the specified area can be obtained through the report, so as to analyse any abnormal situations. Access control in extreme weather conditions In the access control system, the lock (lock cylinder) maintains an extremely high standard and its protection level is IP67, to ensure the greatest degree of protection. Infrared induction technology is used in the electronic key, even if the surface of the lock is wet, the electronic key can also transfer the access authority to the lock cylinder. Ensure stable exchange of information between the key and the lock cylinder. In other words, a poor connection cannot prevent the transmission of information between the key and the lock. At present, this kind of passive electronic lock is widely used in many fields, such as telecom, electric power, water utilities, public utilities, medical emergency and so on in Europe.

Access the right areas - Making a smart home genius with biometrics
Access the right areas - Making a smart home genius with biometrics

Household adoption of smart home systems currently sits at 12.1% and is set to grow to 21.4% by 2025, expanding the market from US$ 78.3 billion to US$ 135 billion, in the same period. Although closely linked to the growth of connectivity technologies, including 5G, tech-savvy consumers are also recognising the benefits of next-generation security systems, to protect and secure their domestic lives. Biometric technologies are already commonplace in our smartphones, PCs and payment cards, enhancing security without compromising convenience. Consequently, manufacturers and developers are taking note of biometric solutions, as a way of levelling-up their smart home solutions. Biometrics offer enhanced security As with any home, security starts at the front door and the first opportunity for biometrics to make a smart home genius lies within the smart lock. Why? Relying on inconvenient unsecure PINs and codes takes the ‘smart’ out of smart locks. As the number of connected systems in our homes increase, we cannot expect consumers to create, remember and use an ever-expanding list of unique passwords and PINs. Indeed, 60% of consumers feel they have too many to remember and the number can be as high as 85 for all personal and private accounts. Biometric solutions strengthen home access control Biometric solutions have a real opportunity to strengthen the security and convenience of home access control Doing this risks consumers becoming apathetic with security, as 41% of consumers admit to re-using the same password or introducing simple minor variations, increasing the risk of hacks and breaches from weak or stolen passwords. Furthermore, continually updating and refreshing passwords, and PINs is unappealing and inconvenient. Consequently, biometric solutions have a real opportunity to strengthen the security and convenience of home access control. Positives of on-device biometric storage Biometric authentication, such as fingerprint recognition uses personally identifiable information, which is stored securely on-device. By using on-device biometric storage, manufacturers are supporting the 38% of consumers, who are worried about privacy and biometrics, and potentially winning over the 17% of people, who don’t use smart home devices for this very reason. Compared to conventional security, such as passwords, PINs or even keys, which can be spoofed, stolen, forgotten or lost, biometrics is difficult to hack and near impossible to spoof. Consequently, homes secured with biometric smart locks are made safer in a significantly more seamless and convenient way for the user. Biometric smart locks Physical access in our domestic lives doesn’t end at the front door with smart locks. Biometrics has endless opportunities to ease our daily lives, replacing passwords and PINs in all devices. Biometric smart locks provide personalised access control to sensitive and hazardous areas, such as medicine cabinets, kitchen drawers, safes, kitchen appliances and bike locks. They offer effective security with a touch or glance. Multi-tenanted sites, such as apartment blocks and student halls, can also become smarter and more secure. With hundreds of people occupying the same building, maintaining high levels of security is the responsibility for every individual occupant. Biometric smart locks limit entry to authorised tenants and eliminate the impact of lost or stolen keys, and passcodes. Furthermore, there’s no need for costly lock replacements and when people leave the building permanently, their data is easily removed from the device. Authorised building access Like biometric smart locks in general, the benefits extend beyond the front door Like biometric smart locks in general, the benefits extend beyond the front door, but also throughout the entire building, such as washing rooms, mail rooms, bike rooms and community spaces, such as gyms. Different people might have different levels of access to these areas, depending on their contracts, creating an access control headache. But, by having biometric smart locks, security teams can ensure that only authorised people have access to the right combination of rooms and areas. Convenience of biometric access cards Additionally, if building owners have options. The biometric sensors can be integrated into the doors themselves, thereby allowing users to touch the sensor, to unlock the door and enter. Furthermore, the latest technology allows biometric access cards to be used. This embeds the sensor into a contactless keycard, allowing the user to place their thumb on the sensor and tap the card to unlock the door. This may be preferable in circumstances where contactless keycards are already in use and can be upgraded. Smarter and seamless security In tandem with the growth of the smart home ecosystem, biometrics has real potential to enhance our daily lives, by delivering smarter, seamless and more convenient security. Significant innovation has made biometrics access control faster, more accurate and secure. Furthermore, today’s sensors are durable and energy efficient. With the capacity for over 10 million touches and ultra-low power consumption, smart home system developers no longer have to worry about added power demands. As consumers continue to invest in their homes and explore new ways to secure and access them, biometrics offers a golden opportunity for market players, to differentiate and make smart homes even smarter.

The physical side of data protection
The physical side of data protection

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has accentuated our digital dependency, on a global scale. Data centres have become even more critical to modern society. The processing and storage of information underpin the economy, characterised by a consistent increase in the volume of data and applications, and reliance upon the internet and IT services. Data centres classed as CNI As such, they are now classed as Critical National Infrastructure (CNI) and sit under the protection of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI). As land continues to surge in value, data centre operators are often limited for choice, on where they place their sites and are increasingly forced to consider developed areas, close to other infrastructures, such as housing or industrial sites. Complex security needs One misconception when it comes to data centres is that physical security is straightforward One misconception when it comes to data centres is that physical security is straightforward. However, in practice, things are far more complex. On top of protecting the external perimeter, thought must also be given to factors, such as access control, hostile vehicle mitigation (HVM), protecting power infrastructure, as well as standby generators and localising security devices to operate independently of the main data centre. Face value How a site looks is more important than you may think. Specify security that appears too hostile risks blatantly advertising that you’re protecting a valuable target, ironically making it more interesting to opportunistic intruders. The heightened security that we recommend to clients for these types of sites, include 4 m high-security fences, coils of razor wire, CCTV, and floodlighting. When used together in an integrated approach, it’s easy to see how they make the site appear hostile against its surroundings. However, it must appear secure enough to give the client peace of mind that the site is adequately protected. Getting the balance right is crucial. So, how do you balance security, acoustics and aesthetics harmoniously? Security comes first These are essential facilities and as a result, they require appropriate security investment. Cutting corners leads to a greater long-term expense and increases the likelihood of highly disruptive attacks. Checkpoints Fortunately, guidance is available through independent accreditations and certifications, such as the Loss Prevention Certification Board’s (LPCB) LPS 1175 ratings, the PAS 68 HVM rating, CPNI approval, and the police initiative - Secured by Design (SBD). Thorough technical evaluation and quality audit These bodies employ thorough technical evaluation work and rigorous quality audit processes to ensure products deliver proven levels of protection. With untested security measures, you will not know whether a product works until an attack occurs. Specifying products accredited by established bodies removes this concern. High maintenance Simply installing security measures and hoping for the best will not guarantee 24/7 protection. Just as you would keep computer software and hardware updated, to provide the best level of protection for the data, physical security also needs to be well-maintained, in order to ensure it is providing optimum performance. Importance of testing physical security parameters Inspecting the fence line may seem obvious and straightforward, but it needs to be done regularly. From our experience, this is something that is frequently overlooked. The research we conducted revealed that 63% of companies never test their physical security. They should check the perimeter on both sides and look for any attempted breaches. Foliage, weather conditions or topography changes can also affect security integrity. Companies should also check all fixtures and fittings, looking for damage and corrosion, and clear any litter and debris away. Accessibility When considering access control, speed gates offer an excellent solution for data centres. How quickly a gate can open and close is essential, especially when access to the site is restricted. The consequences of access control equipment failing can be extremely serious, far over a minor irritation or inconvenience. Vehicle and pedestrian barriers, especially if automated, require special attention to maintain effective security and efficiency. Volume control Data centres don’t generally make the best neighbours. The noise created from their 24-hour operation can be considerable. HVAC systems, event-triggered security and fire alarms, HV substations, and vehicle traffic can quickly become unbearable for residents. Secure and soundproof perimeter As well as having excellent noise-reducing properties, timber is also a robust material for security fencing So, how do you create a secure and soundproof perimeter? Fortunately, through LPS 1175 certification and CPNI approval, it is possible to combine high-security performance and up to 28dB of noise reduction capabilities. As well as having excellent noise-reducing properties, timber is also a robust material for security fencing. Seamlessly locking thick timber boards create a flat face, making climbing difficult and the solid boards prevent lines of sight into the facility. For extra protection, steel mesh can either be added to one side of the fence or sandwiched between the timber boards, making it extremely difficult to break through. A fair façade A high-security timber fence can be both, aesthetically pleasing and disguise its security credentials. Its pleasant natural façade provides a foil to the stern steel bars and mesh, often seen with other high-security solutions. Of course, it’s still important that fencing serves its primary purposes, so make sure you refer to certifications, to establish a product’s security and acoustic performance. Better protected The value of data cannot be overstated. A breach can have severe consequences for public safety and the economy, leading to serious national security implications. Countering varied security threats Data centres are faced with an incredibly diverse range of threats, including activism, sabotage, trespass, and terrorism on a daily basis. It’s no wonder the government has taken an active role in assisting with their protection through the medium of the CPNI and NCSC. By working with government bodies such as the CPNI and certification boards like the LPCB, specifiers can access a vault of useful knowledge and advice. This will guide them to effective and quality products that are appropriate for their specific site in question, ensuring it’s kept safe and secure.

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