Honeywell expands popular access control family
Honeywell expands popular access control family

Honeywell has introduced a new version of its popular NetAXS web-based access control panel ideal for small installations. The new NetAXS™ 2-door web-based control panel provides all the security of an access control system with the convenience of managing it via a web browser. The panel allows users to protect as few as two doors and add more panels as needs change. In addition, the new NetAXS 2-door control panel can be used in conjunction with current NetAXS 4-door panel solutions to meet any access control requirements that customers may have. By combining the 2-door and 4-door solutions over any Ethernet network, users now have a powerful choice that can fit almost any application.NetAXS is quick and easy to install and offers a cost-effective alternative to traditional PC-based systems because it allows end users to easily customise the level of security and functionality based on their needs. The system's built-in web server allows end users to manage the system anywhere an Internet connection is available or alternatively by connecting a laptop directly to the panel's Ethernet port. The web browser allows a customer to run reports, monitor events and alarms, and add and remove users. This flexibility is ideal for remote activity such as facility check-in, managed access and manual override of doors or time zones. With no PC software to install, customers who choose the web interface have no worries about operating system compatibility, virus attacks or other computer issues such as hard drive crashes or system lock-ups.The NetAXS 2-door control panel can also be added to most installations that use Honeywell's WIN-PAK® access control system and offers additional benefits over Honeywell's traditional N-1000 control panels including on-board Ethernet, an expandable footprint, larger memory capacity and faster processing."With the addition of this new panel to the NetAXS family, we can offer an access control solution for any size facility," said René von Franquemont, access control product marketing manager for Honeywell Systems Group EMEA. "This new panel is a strong addition to our access control offering. Its basic functionality provides greater flexibility in cost-effective security system design to answer the needs of our value-driven customers. The installer-friendly features and the intuitive browser-based interface enable NetAXS to be confidently installed by all, including those new to access control."Download NetAXS™ End User Flyer PDF

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Honeywell unveiled full suite of IP video, integrated and advanced security solutions at IFSEC 2010
Honeywell unveiled full suite of IP video, integrated and advanced security solutions at IFSEC 2010

Honeywell showcased a variety of new access, video and intrusion security systems at IFSEC 2010.Every Honeywell solution is designed with installers and end users in mind. For installers, the broad range of Honeywell products is quick and easy to deploy and opens up new revenue opportunities to grow their business. Meanwhile, end users benefit from standalone products and fully integrated solutions with intuitive interfaces, innovative features and industry-leading reliability.The Honeywell solutions that took the spotlight this year include:Access control: Honeywell previews the web-enabled NETAXS™ 123 access control entry level system which gives users all the benefits of traditional access control, including securing 1-3 doors, remote site and access management without the need for a dedicated PC or software.Video solutions: The new Fusion IV Digital Video Recorder (DVR) hybrid IP-analogue recording solution facilitates easy migration to IP systems from analogue systems. The Fusion IV has the ability to record, search and transmit up to 32 channels of analogue or IP video sources and users can customise video recording and transmission with user-selectable, multiple compression types that can be applied on a per camera basis. Honeywell's latest analogue cameras will also be showcased at IFSEC 2010, including the ACUIX™ ES PTZ dome, and the Performance series of bullet cameras and mini-domes.IP solutions portfolio: Including the Fusion IV Network Video Recorder (NVR), HCX megapixel, HD3MDIPX, ACUIX™ IP PTZ and EQUIP® Series camera ranges. The HD3MDIPX is the first in a series of high definition cameras that offer superior image quality without the need for extra bandwidth or storage requirements. This fully comprehensive IP portfolio of products provides high level network surveillance to organisations of any size and in any environment, beyond the capability of standard analogue cameras. Integrated solutions: Honeywell's fully integrated solutions allow users to customise their security systems to their specific needs and requirements. A variety of integrated solution possibilities comprising of intruder, video and access products will be on display including Galaxy® Dimension, MAXPRO® Video Management System, Pro-Watch®, Fusion and WIN-PAK®.Wireless intruder solutions: Honeywell's total Wireless portfolio brings new wireless capabilities to the Galaxy Dimension intruder alarm system and extends the range of wireless sensors available for the hybrid G2 intruder alarm system. Superior performance, high reliability and enhanced flexibility are achieved using patented technologies including bi-directional radio, agile routing and wireless K-band DUAL TEC® sensors and detectors.For information on Honeywell's security solutions visit www.honeywell.com/security/uk

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Access control systems & kits - Expert commentary

Protect physical assets from cyber-attacks
Protect physical assets from cyber-attacks

Recent cyber-attacks have disabled and even shut down physical assets. Robust foundational security and training staff, able to recognise an attack can help mitigate the threat, as ABB’s Rob Putman explains. Edge devices and data analytics As cyber security specialists, we must navigate an ever-changing threat landscape, one that is made even more complex by the increased interconnectivity between Operational Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT), as companies look to leverage edge devices and data analytics, as well as remote connectivity, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the threat surface evolves, the industry must guard against attacks on key physical infrastructure, carried out by a range of malicious actors, including nation states and criminals intent on blackmail. The chemicals sector, a high-value target for cyber-criminals Cyber-criminals view the chemicals sector, as a high-value target, because of the potential cost In 2017, not long after a ransomware attack that targeted Maersk, the world’s largest shipping firm, made the news around the world. Another cyber-attack, this time targeting physical industrial assets, generated fewer headlines, and yet could have resulted in both real, as well as financial, damage. Cyber-criminals view the chemicals sector, as a high-value target, because of the potential cost, both financial and reputational, to the operator, should production be interrupted or stopped entirely. Cyber security vulnerabilities put physical assets at risk The attack in question, a ‘Triton’ custom malware attack on a petro-chemical facility in Saudi Arabia, targeted a safety system, taking over system controllers. Bugs in the code triggered an emergency shutdown, but could have led to the release of toxic and explosive gases. It was a vivid reminder of how cyber security vulnerabilities are increasingly putting companies’ key physical assets at risk. Two more-recent high-profile incidents illustrate my point. In February, a Florida water treatment plant was hacked. The malicious actor remotely accessed the system for three to five minutes, during which time they opened various functions on the screen, including one that controls the amount of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the water. The hacker changed the NaOH from about 100 parts per million to 11,100 parts per million, which could have resulted in a mass poisoning event. Colonial Pipeline cyber-attack incident Then, in May, the Colonial Pipeline system that originates in Houston, Texas and carries gasoline, and jet fuel, suffered a ransomware attack. Using a VPN, hackers targeted back-office IT systems, forcing Colonial to shut down IT hosts and network infrastructure, severing communication with those OT systems that are responsible for communicating ‘transactional data’ associated with fuel delivery. In this instance, a single compromised password disrupted Colonial’s ability to invoice its customers. This dependency on OT data stopped pipeline and business operations, and the company was elected to pay the hackers an initial ransom of US$ 4.4 million, in order to restore operations. The Colonial attack was multi-dimensional, in that it not only impacted Colonial’s business, but also the wider US economy and national security, since the pipeline transports nearly half of the east coast's fuel supplies. Outdated IT system elevates physical risk The increased interconnectivity between IT and OT can also create vulnerabilit Attacks such as these prove that, armed with little more than a laptop, an email account and access to the dark web, determined hackers can cause disproportionate damage to physical infrastructure. As mentioned at the outset, the increased interconnectivity between IT and OT can also create vulnerability. Producers often want to know: Is it risky to connect a production asset or their operational environment to the Cloud? My answer is, if you do so without having done any risk audits around people, processes and technology, or without enhancing and maintaining that environment, then yes, that is risky. For example, we often observe that the life cycle of a production asset far outlasts the IT systems that are used to run it. Take a cement kiln. Several generations of plant operators may have come and gone, but that asset may still run, using legacy software, such as Windows XP and why not? Need to replace aging distributed control systems Well, that’s fine, if you are not concerned about having that asset compromised, and all that entails. A ‘flat’ IT network, an aging distributed control system, and machines with legacy versions of Microsoft Windows, all these elements, which are still commonplace in many industries, make it much easier for attackers to find and infiltrate a company, without needing sophisticated tools. The age-old mantra of not interfering with a piece of equipment or software that appears to be working, often applies to the individual assets. For example that cement kiln that are still controlled by the same Windows XP-based control software. However, if we’re honest, things have changed quite a bit, not because something was broken, but because innovation came in. That same kiln control system is most likely connected to other systems, than when first commissioned and that opens it to exposure to threats that it was never designed for. The human element There is a misconception that IoT-connected devices can open companies to risk There is a misconception that IoT-connected devices can open companies to risk, but many recent, high-profile cyber-attacks have been conducted from a laptop, by hacking someone’s VPN, or are a simple phishing/malware attack. In all these cases, the human element is partly to blame. Take the Florida attack. The compromised computer at the water treatment facility was reportedly running an outdated Windows 7 operating system and staff all used the same password, in order to gain remote access via the Teamviewer app, which the hacker was then able to use. Physical and human assets, key to robust cyber security Discussion on the best way to mitigate the threat is often framed solely around specific technical solutions and ignores the fact that robust foundational cyber security is really driven by two very different, but equally important, types of capital: physical assets (e.g. production machinery), and human assets. The truth is that smart digital software and industry-renowned cyber security applications, while critical, are in many cases, only as good as the weakest human link in the chain. Industry would, therefore, do well to ask itself the following question: Do we have a security problem, or a complacency problem? At this juncture, it is important to point out that the majority of companies that ABB works with, are at least aware of the threat posed by cyber attackers, and the potential impact of an attack, on their revenues, reputation and bottom line. User error and human-generated exposures Making sure staff are aware of the threat and training them to respond properly, if they are targeted, is vital However, user error and human-generated exposures are where most of these attacks occur. Those human failures are mostly not due to malicious intent from employees, but to the lack of training of the employees on secure behavior. Making sure staff are aware of the threat and training them to respond properly, if they are targeted, is vital. However, there are also age demographics at play here. Much of the operations employee base is heading towards retirement and often, there is no plan or ability to backfill these people. Need to invest in new digital and automated technologies If you think you don't have enough people now, in order to stay on top of basic care and feeding of the OT environment, with regards to security, what is that going to be like in 20 years? For this reason, there must be a major industry reset, when it comes to its workforce. Companies must invest in new digital and automated technologies, not only to ensure that they stay ahead of the curve and mitigate risk, but also to attract the next generation of digitally literate talent. Robust cyber security is built on solid foundations When we talk about foundational cyber security, we mean fundamentals, such as patching, malware protection, high-fidelity system backups, an up-to-date anti-virus system, and other options, such as application allow-listing and asset inventory. These basic controls can help companies understand their system setup and the potential threats, identify vulnerabilities, and assess their risk exposure. The Pareto principle states that around 80% of consequences come from 20% of the causes. In the context of cyber security, that means 80% of exposure to risk comes from 20% of the lack of security. If companies do the foundational things right, they can manage out a significant amount of this risk. Importance of maintaining and upgrading security controls However, having basic security controls, such as anti-virus software in place, is just the first step on that journey. Equally important is having someone within the organisation, with the requisite skill set, or the extra labour bandwidth, to operate, maintain and update those security controls, as they evolve. Educating, training and recruiting existing employees, and the next generation of talent, along with forging partnerships with trusted technology providers, will ensure that industry can leverage the latest digital technologies, in order to drive business value, and secure physical assets against cyber-attacks.

The robotic transformation of the security industry
The robotic transformation of the security industry

The COVID-19 pandemic is only accelerating the expansion of Automation, Robotics, Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), and changing how people live their daily lives. This expansion leads the way with technologies that are developed to solve problems, improve operations, streamline processes and assist people, to focus on learning new skills, creativity, and imagination. Transformation of the physical security industry One of the latest industries to be permanently transformed is physical security. The era of utilising security cameras is slowly changing into more advanced and more efficient technological applications - security robotic solutions. SMP Robotics is a California-based company, which is a pioneer in developing robotic technologies, powered by AI, to assist, improve and deliver on new expectations in today’s world. One of their services is smart surveillance systems. This represents a proactive approach to security. The company, SMP Robotics’ Founder and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Leo Ryzhenko, stated “Autonomous robotic technologies will become a driving force in future security solutions.” Robotics and AI in autonomous security solutions The robots can patrol 24/7, counteracting intrusion and communicating via voice message with guards The company uses robotics and AI technology to implement autonomous security solutions, which reduce liability and overhead, as well as improving the quality of services. Robotic guards are capable of patrolling all types of facilities, in both urban and rural contexts. The robots can patrol 24/7, counteracting intrusion and communicating via voice message with guards. The inspection robots, deployed by SMP Robotics, are easily integrated with many existing security technologies, armed with obstacle avoidance and anti-collision measures, automatically recharge, and can recognise faces up to 50 metres. As the world grows increasingly complex, technology like this is essential to ensure safety for all. AI-enabled autonomous video monitoring ground vehicles The advancements in technological breakthroughs of SMP Robotics position the company and its AI-powered, autonomous video monitoring ground vehicles, to be the most adaptable to any industry, cost-effective for clients’ business needs, in providing various types of services from public safety, crime prevention, to asset protection and physical security. SMP Robotics continues to implement new innovative solutions and groundbreaking technologies in its latest generation of autonomous models. Currently, many were already deployed or in a process to be delivered to a number of key clients, in various industries throughout the globe, from oil & gas, nuclear power plants to data centers, healthcare facilities, and amusement parks. Smart security robots Tal Turner, the Vice President (VP) of Business Development and Partnerships, SMP Robotics, said “We provide autonomous, artificial intelligence, all-weather, all-surface, smart security robots that are turnkey and operate independently on their own, using real-time obstacle avoidance, face recognition, and other cutting-edge technological advancements.” According to Coherent Market Insights, the Robots as a Service (RaaS) market direction will grow by 15.9% by 2028 and reach the threshold of 41.3 billion dollars. SMP Robotics stands at the forefront of the security robotic revolution, making an impactful change to make the world a safer place.

How schools can make outdoor learning safe and secure
How schools can make outdoor learning safe and secure

Schools were never designed and built with social distancing in mind. So it’s perhaps not surprising that as children returned to schools for the autumn term this year, the prospect of outdoor classes and assemblies was mooted in the media and by the Government. Many in the education sector are making the case that, should there be further COVID-19 outbreaks, in the coming months, it would be better to utilise outside space, rather than resort to closing schools. In the COVID-19 era, head teachers are considering taking learning and large gatherings, such as assemblies outdoors, when possible. Managing ‘class bubbles’, hygiene and ventilation While Dr. Yvonne Doyle, the Medical Director of Public Health England (PHE) has publicly reassured parents that schools are not the ‘drivers’ or ‘hubs’ of COVID-19-19 infection in communities, there is a lot of pressure on school leaders to manage ‘class bubbles’, extra cleaning and hygiene, ventilation, and COVID-19 testing, to protect families and staff. It’s a logical step to switch, in certain circumstances, to outdoor activities where fresh air is on tap, and social distancing is far easier to manage. Specially built outdoor classrooms Across the school and nursery sector, there’s ongoing investment in specially built outdoor classrooms Across the school and nursery sector, there’s ongoing investment in specially built outdoor classrooms, which had been growing in popularity, even before the pandemic. These facilities offer numerous benefits as an extension of existing learning spaces and provide children the opportunity for hands-on learning, beyond a stuffy classroom. However, if outdoor spaces are routinely called upon as part of COVID-19 contingency planning, how can schools ensure that their outdoor classrooms and wider areas are secure, robust, and fit for purpose? When specifying outdoor classrooms and learning spaces, it’s essential to take into account the well-being of the students and staff, who will use them, noise pollution and acoustics. Most importantly, education managers need to ensure the surrounding area is secured and adequately protected from threats, including terrorism. Perimeter security measures for schools How can schools and nurseries secure their perimeters, so that outdoor learning is totally safe for all? A starting point is to seek out architects and suppliers, who have a good understanding of security standards. Worryingly, Jacksons Fencing’s research recently found that only one-third of architects are seeing both LPS 1175 and the UK police initiative, Secured by Design (SBD) physical security standards, specified for schools. This highlights a lost opportunity for architects to propose solutions that are appropriate to the level of risk and needs of the school, without turning the site into an unwelcoming fortress. Helping schools identify specific security needs Head teachers would be wise to work with architects, who not only know the latest security standards inside and out, but are also are willing to play a more advisory role, helping the school identify exactly what is needed. Head teachers should prioritise solutions appropriate to their site’s specific risks It’s also vital that architects don’t simply replace existing fencing and gates, with the same security systems that have been in place for years. Instead, they will need to meet changing needs and risks. Our research finds that teachers often report issues, with the school perimeter and gates, from being climbed over (28%) and causing injury, to gates not locking properly (10%). Head teachers should prioritise solutions appropriate to their site’s specific risks, which sometimes require altering of existing measures. School fencing is an important aspect of any education site. As well as defining its boundary and making a visual distinction between public and private property, the fencing and gates that surround and secure a school, will typically meet a wide variety of other important criteria, including preventing unauthorised entry to the grounds, protecting pupils, staff, and visitors from accidents and injury, deterring theft and anti-social behaviour, and reducing the risk of malicious damage, and acts of terrorism. Welded mesh panels for perimeter fencing Popular options for schools include welded mesh panels for perimeter fencing or sports areas, and railing systems to act as demarcation, in order to control foot and car traffic. Within the outlying boundary, barriers, bollards and parking posts will keep pedestrians, and vehicles safe from each other, while timber fencing and gates can be designed to control the flow of people, around the grounds and reduce the areas, where students can be hidden from view. Automated gates and access control Perimeter fencing must be complemented with safe entrances and exits for vehicles and pedestrians. Every school has unique entry-control requirements, determined by factors, such as size, location and the local environment. These needs influence the decisions you make, when preparing technical specifications for school security gates. Do you require gates to be steel or timber, manual or automated, single or double leaf? Specialist suppliers will be in the best position to offer inputs on school gates, which typically need to offer solid security and durability, with a welcoming aesthetic. Specifying access control system When specifying a school access system, it’s important to consider the areas of the school When specifying a school access system, it’s important to consider the areas of the school, such as sports fields, car parks, and children’s play and learning areas, and whether it requires playground segregation. Selected gates should meet the design of the fencing, to create a secure perimeter with no weak points, with automated gates conforming to all current safety regulations. . Noise pollution can be a problem as well, including noise coming in or leaving the school in residential areas. If more teaching is to be carried out outside, it’s worth considering acoustic barriers to reduce noise in and around the school. Timber acoustic barriers for security and privacy Timber acoustic barriers offer security and privacy, and can reduce noise levels, by as much as 32 decibels (in laboratory conditions), so are ideal for city centre schools or those located close to busy highways. There are many ways to build an outdoor classroom. Timber products can help to create a welcoming environment, such as wooden shelters, pergolas, fencing, and decking. Always check that high quality timber, ideally guaranteed for 25 years against rot and insect attack, is being used to provide an attractive, cost-effective, safe and sustainable solution, for all weather conditions. DBS approved installers And of course, installers must be DBS approved, so that they can install outdoor classrooms, during school holidays, or within term time, with minimal disruption. The COVID-19 pandemic had a huge impact on schools and learning. While nobody wants to think of fresh outbreaks of the infection, or any other virus, installing an outdoor classroom made from high-quality, long-lasting materials is a great way to future-proof school learning and ensure safety, and preparedness. Putting extra thought and care into the security angle will provide schools with decades of protection against a host of unforeseen events.

Latest Honeywell news

Soloinsight to showcase their CloudGate VIAM platform at the CREtech New York 2021
Soloinsight to showcase their CloudGate VIAM platform at the CREtech New York 2021

Soloinsight Inc., a workflow automation platform company, will be featured at this year’s CREtech event in New York City. The company’s CEO, Carter Kennedy, will be a panelist for the show’s ‘The Ever-Evolving and Future of Access Control’ session on Wednesday, October 13th at 11 am EST. As a company that was recently awarded the Security Industry Association’s (SIA) new product showcase award in the hosted solutions/managed services category, Soloinsight is no stranger to innovating in the commercial real estate and access control industries. Workflow automation platform Soloinsight has integrated with some of the biggest names in the access control and visitor identity spaces Their product, CloudGate, is a visitor identity and access management (VIAM) platform that delivers unprecedented security and an intuitive guest and host experience at multiple locations via the cloud, on-prem, or hybrid infrastructures. Since the introduction of CloudGate, Soloinsight has integrated with some of the biggest names in the access control and visitor identity spaces, such as Johnson Controls, LenelS2, and Honeywell, to deliver a secure and seamless security workflow automation platform. With a platform that touches nearly every point in visitor and access management — from its mobile concierge technology, self-service kiosks, and turnstile integrations, Soloinsight is poised to be a game-changer in the commercial real estate industry. “We are excited to partner with access control manufacturers and property management companies to alleviate these challenges and advance their access control systems to the next level.” - President and CTO, Farhan Masood.

Alarm Man of NC offers state-of-the-art security solutions in North Carolina
Alarm Man of NC offers state-of-the-art security solutions in North Carolina

Alarm Man is one of the most trusted security solution providers that offer dedicated services in areas of North Carolina and has been the pioneer in the domain since its establishment in 1980. This family-owned and the locally based company offers state-of-the-art security systems to residential and business establishments alike. Hence, be it for fire alarms in Cary and Raleigh, North Carolina or security and surveillance systems, Alarm Man of NC, is the most trusted name in the whole of North Carolina. HD cameras The range of services offered by Alarm Man of NC includes installation, repair, and maintenance of security systems, monitoring devices, HD cameras, and CCTV, fire alarms, and more. Alarm Man is also an authorised dealer of Honeywell, and their technicians and professionals have vast knowledge in the effective handling of all their products. They specialise in carrying out seamless installations without disrupting the schedules of the property owners The system installations done by their professional technicians are done in a manner that they do not take up much space on the walls and are totally in sync with the overall look and feel of the space. Their skilled professionals have the due experience and knowledge to meet all the code requirements while installing the security systems. They specialise in carrying out seamless installations without disrupting the schedules of the property owners. Honeywell's Total Connect Alarm Man of NC looks forward to satisfying its clients by ensuring maximum security to their residential property and businesses so that one can live life carefreely. They also offer medical alert systems part of Honeywell's Total Connect so aging relatives can get quick help in an emergency. The security systems in Raleigh and Cary, North Carolina are designed in a manner that they can create awareness of mishaps just at the right time. Besides, the services provided by this company are just a call away from the clients. One has to dial 919-682-3379 to have a word with them.

Connected Technologies launches Connect ONE cloud-hosted management platform to make system integration easier
Connected Technologies launches Connect ONE cloud-hosted management platform to make system integration easier

Connect ONE® from Connected Technologies is the only cloud-hosted management platform one needs for all the system integrations: intrusion, access control, video surveillance, critical environmental monitoring and energy management. With the award-winning Safe Passage module for access control user authorisation and ScanPass mobile credential for frictionless entrance control, dealers and their customers have the latest services to manage multiple locations through one user interface. Connect ONE works with Bosch B and G, DMP XR/XT, ELK M1 and Honeywell Vista Turbo security and access control panels. It also integrates with ASSA ABLOY Aperio® wireless locks as well as Digital Watchdog, OpenEye, ExacqVision and Eagle Eye Networks video technologies.

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