DSX-IP Gateway
DSX-IP Gateway

DSX Communications typically run from the Comm Server PC over the customer network to a DSX-LAN module that is connected to the first or Master controller at each Location. Communications then takes the form of a dedicated RS-485 regenerative communications network that runs between system controllers. DSX-IP Gateway changes the way communications are distributed throughout the system.IP Gateway takes the place of a Master controller and will communicate to any Slave or cluster of Slave controllers over the network negating the need for the dedicated RS-485 communications wiring, with the exception of the cabling between controllers in a cluster of slave controllers.DSX-IP Gateway is performed using the standard WinDSX software and the IP Gateway application that is available on all Software distribution CDs. IP Gateway can be deployed on the same PC as the Comm Server or on a separate PC if multiple copies need to be run due to size of system. Each IP Gateway can support 63 DSX controllers or 126 Doors.Scalable Architecture - What you need where you need it.TCP/IP Communications to each Controller or Controller cluster with DSX-LAN Module.Supports AES-256 Communications Encryption to all Controllers without special hardware.Supports 240+ Card and Keypad Formats including FIPS 201 and TWIC.Real Time Processing and Communications between Clusters.Compatible with existing DSX Controllers.Communications to each controller cluster operates simultaneously. These simultaneous communications channels can provide a substantial increase in the rate of data collection and distribution.Each IP Gateway can support 63 DSX controllers or 126 Doors 

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Combined with non-host dependant, fully distributed processing controllers, WinDSX provides total access control
Combined with non-host dependant, fully distributed processing controllers, WinDSX provides total access control

WinDSX is a powerful access control and system monitoring application that harnesses the power of the Windows XP, Vista, and 7 Professional™ operating systems. WinDSX combines point monitoring and access control with Photo ID Badging, Time and Attendance, Alarm Graphics, DVR/NVR Integration, Elevator Control, Alarm Email/Text Message Notification, Threat Level Management, HazMat / Emergency Lockdown, and FIPS/TWIC card compatibility.WinDSX can support your access control needs from a single PC or multi-user Local Area Network to an enterprise solution with SQL Server as the database engine. The system utilises TCP/IP network communications to provide user interaction and real time monitoring to the workstation PC's located anywhere on the LAN or WAN. Password protection allows for operator specific capabilities at each workstation.There are two Editions of Software. WinDSX comes standard with a Microsoft Access database engine. WinDSX SQL is designed to work with Microsoft SQL Server as the database engine. Both editions of WinDSX have similar features and capabilities. Microsoft SQL Server is user supplied.WinDSX implements Point and Click operation with hierarchical tree views and pop up menus for ease of use. I/O monitoring and control is achieved through animated icons that depict the real time status of each input or output. I/O points can also be assigned to an Override Group to allow for multiple inputs and outputs to be monitored and controlled from a single icon.Scheduled Overrides can be assigned to individual Inputs and Outputs as well as Override Groups. These schedules allow operators to quickly assign time and date sensitive instructions determining the open/secure status of outputs and the armed state of inputs.

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DSX-Soft I/O Integration Software
DSX-Soft I/O Integration Software

DSX now has the ability to integrate with various different external devices through serial data streams. This integration allows other systems such as elevators, wireless locksets, intercom,HVAC, fire alarm, etc., to interact with the DSX network of controllers through a serial data or TCP/IP link between the systems.High Level Elevator Control - (OTIS®, KONE®)Wireless Locksets - (Schlage®)Supports Virtual Inputs and OutputsUser Defined Command Strings - In and OutSupports open and proprietary protocolsRS-232/485 / TCP/IP CommunicationsWhat Can It Do?The DSX Soft I/O product will allow you to integrate WinDSX with different systems. Now you can use one software package to monitor and control multiple building systems. You can even program action/reaction linking events between diverse systems.The DSX Soft I/O can be thought of as a universal translator. It can speak to multiple systems simultaneously and control interaction between those systems based on logic that you define.The applications are only limited to your imagination. You could integrate an intercom system with the security and CCTV so that when an intercom station is pressed the WinDSX system annunciates it, and instructs the CCTV system to pan the camera to the proper position and display it on screen.You could also program a high temperature alarm from the HVAC system to automatically display the appropriate camera at the security desk. The applications are limitless. Soft I/O can be the communications translator between systems that could not otherwise communicate with each other.

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Access control software - Expert commentary

How organisations can secure user credentials from data breaches and password hacks
How organisations can secure user credentials from data breaches and password hacks

In the age of massive data breaches, phishing attacks and password hacks, user credentials are increasingly unsafe. So how can organisations secure accounts without making life more difficult for users? Marc Vanmaele, CEO of TrustBuilder, explains. User credentials give us a sense of security. Users select their password, it's personal and memorable to them, and it's likely that it includes special characters and numbers for added security. Sadly, this sense is most likely false. If it's anything like the 5.4 billion user IDs on haveibeenpwned.com, their login has already been compromised. If it's not listed, it could be soon. Recent estimates state that 8 million more credentials are compromised every day. Ensuring safe access Data breaches, ransomware and phishing campaigns are increasingly easy to pull off. Cyber criminals can easily find the tools they need on Google with little to no technical knowledge. Breached passwords are readily available to cyber criminals on the internet. Those that haven’t been breached can also be guessed, phished or cracked using one of the many “brute-force” tools available on the internet. It's becoming clear that login credentials are no longer enough to secure your users' accounts. Meanwhile, organisations have a responsibility and an ever-stricter legal obligation to protect their users’ sensitive data. This makes ensuring safe access to the services they need challenging, particularly when trying to provide a user experience that won’t cause frustration – or worse, lose your customers’ interest. After GDPR was implemented across the European Union, organisations could face a fine of up to €20 million, or 4% annual global turnover Importance of data protection So how can businesses ensure their users can safely and simply access the services they need while keeping intruders out, and why is it so important to strike that balance? After GDPR was implemented across the European Union, organisations could face a fine of up to €20 million, or 4% annual global turnover – whichever is higher, should they seriously fail to comply with their data protection obligations. This alone was enough to prompt many organisations to get serious about their user’s security. Still, not every business followed suit. Cloud security risks Breaches were most commonly identified in organisations using cloud computing or where staff use personal devices According to a recent survey conducted at Infosecurity Europe, more than a quarter of organisations did not feel ready to comply with GDPR in August 2018 – three months after the compliance deadline. Meanwhile, according to the UK Government’s 2018 Cyber Security Breaches survey, 45% of businesses reported breaches or attacks in the last 12 months. According to the report, logins are less secure when accessing services in the cloud where they aren't protected by enterprise firewalls and security systems. Moreover, breaches were most commonly identified in organisations using cloud computing or where staff use personal devices (known as BYOD). According to the survey, 61% of UK organisations use cloud-based services. The figure is higher in banking and finance (74%), IT and communications (81%) and education (75%). Additionally, 45% of businesses have BYOD. This indicates a precarious situation. The majority of businesses hold personal data on users electronically and may be placing users at risk if their IT environments are not adequately protected. Hackers have developed a wide range of tools to crack passwords, and these are readily available within a couple of clicks on a search engine Hacking methodology In a recent exposé on LifeHacker, Internet standards expert John Pozadzides revealed multiple methods hackers use to bypass even the most secure passwords. According to John’s revelations, 20% of passwords are simple enough to guess using easily accessible information. But that doesn’t leave the remaining 80% safe. Hackers have developed a wide range of tools to crack passwords, and these are readily available within a couple of clicks on a search engine. Brute force attacks are one of the easiest methods, but criminals also use increasingly sophisticated phishing campaigns to fool users into handing over their passwords. Users expect organisations to protect their passwords and keep intruders out of their accounts Once a threat actor has access to one password, they can easily gain access to multiple accounts. This is because, according to Mashable, 87% of users aged 18-30 and 81% of users aged 31+ reuse the same passwords across multiple accounts. It’s becoming clear that passwords are no longer enough to keep online accounts secure. Securing data with simplicity Users expect organisations to protect their passwords and keep intruders out of their accounts. As a result of a data breach, companies will of course suffer financial losses through fines and remediation costs. Beyond the immediate financial repercussions, however, the reputational damage can be seriously costly. A recent Gemalto study showed that 44% of consumers would leave their bank in the event of a security breach, and 38% would switch to a competitor offering a better service. Simplicity is equally important, however. For example, if it’s not delivered in ecommerce, one in three customers will abandon their purchase – as a recent report by Magnetic North revealed. If a login process is confusing, staff may be tempted to help themselves access the information they need by slipping out of secure habits. They may write their passwords down, share them with other members of staff, and may be more susceptible to social engineering attacks. So how do organisations strike the right balance? For many, Identity and Access Management solutions help to deliver secure access across the entire estate. It’s important though that these enable simplicity for the organisation, as well as users. Organisations need an IAM solution that will adapt to both of these factors, providing them with the ability to apply tough access policies when and where they are needed and prioritising swift access where it’s safe to do so Flexible IAM While IAM is highly recommended, organisations should seek solutions that offer the flexibility to define their own balance between a seamless end-user journey and the need for a high level of identity assurance. Organisations’ identity management requirements will change over time. So too will their IT environments. Organisations need an IAM solution that will adapt to both of these factors, providing them with the ability to apply tough access policies when and where they are needed and prioritising swift access where it’s safe to do so. Importantly, the best solutions will be those that enable this flexibility without spending significant time and resource each time adaptations need to be made. Those that do will provide the best return on investment for organisations looking to keep intruders at bay, while enabling users to log in safely and simply.

The many faces of today's facial recognition technology
The many faces of today's facial recognition technology

The use of facial recognition has become a highly debated topic recently, and has increasingly and misleadingly been criticised by some for being an unethical tool used to spy on the public. The reason for such criticism is however largely due to lack of information and regulation around the technology. Used proportionately and responsibly, facial recognition can and should be a force for good. It has the ability to do a lot more to increase security in the future – from street crime to airport security, all the way through to helping those battling addiction, the technology can take security and operations to new heights. These systems can memorise the faces of persons of interest, networks of gang members, wanted criminals and those suspected of involvement in serious violent crimes The rise in knife crime Knife crime has dominated the headlines in the UK throughout the year. Recent statistics show the number of people being admitted to emergency care due to attacks by a sharp object to be up by nearly 40 per cent from two years ago, whilst the number of children under the age of 18 being admitted to hospitals with stab wounds is up by 86 per cent in only four years. This recent surge in knife crime has put police forces under immense pressure, and the intelligent use of facial recognition has a role to play in enabling more informed stop & search interventions. Currently UK police can stop and search an individual they suspect to be carrying drugs or weapons or both, or they can stop and search a person in a location where there have been or are considered likely to be “incidents involving serious violence.” In both cases they must do so with access to limited information, leaving themselves open to accusations of bias or discrimination. Knife crime dominated the headlines in the UK throughout 2018 Police systems benefiting crime investigations This is where facial recognition can offer up additional intelligence. These systems can memorise the faces of persons of interest, networks of gang members, wanted criminals and those suspected of involvement in serious violent crimes. Furthermore, these systems don’t need prior personal engagement to recognise an individual and see only data, not gender, age or race. Facial recognition thus helps eliminate both weapons and criminals off the streets and potentially prevent crimes before they have a chance to take place. The technology doesn’t take the decision away from the human police officer. However, it does bring greater transparency and context to the decision-making process of whether a stop and search intervention is justified.  Similarly, the advanced technology can recognise and match an individual seen on a CCTV camera at a crime scene to someone the police encounters on the streets some time later, justifying a stop and search on that individual. Its ability to check in real time if a person is on a criminal watchlist adds an extra layer to the decision-making process prior to conducting a stop and search, lowering the likelihood of discrimination. Facial recognition thus helps eliminate both weapons and criminals off the streets and potentially prevent crimes before they have a chance to take place. Gambling addiction and how facial recognition can help There are an estimated 593,000 people in the UK currently battling a gambling problem, making it a serious public health issue in the country. Having understood the gravity of the issue, the UK gambling commission have set limits and advice in place to help those suffering this addiction; yet as with all addictions, gambling is a tough habit to beat. In order to put effective limitations in place and make a real difference, the gambling commission needs the right technology to protect those most vulnerable in the industry.   Facial recognition technology is able to keep track of customers and thus help gambling companies in protecting their customers Facial recognition technology is able to keep track of customers and thus help gambling companies in protecting their customers to a higher degree. Monitoring those entering and moving around gambling areas is an extremely difficult task for human staff to do alone, especially in large crowded areas such as casinos. Facial recognition technology installed around the premises would be able to help the company and the staff to identify people who have registered as gambling addicts, and keep record of their day’s play in order to inform staff if and when it was time for them to stop. It would also be able to ensure effective self-exclusion procedures, by identifying a self-excluded individual via CCTV as soon as they entered the venue to then allow security staff to respectfully escort them out. Utilising facial recognition at airport security Facial recognition has by now become a normal sight at many airports around the world. Several people today hold a so-called biometric passport, which allows them to skip the normally longer queues and instead walk through an automated ePassport control to proceed to the gate faster without having to deal with control officers. Facial recognition used in this way has managed to significantly cut waiting times at the passport control, but it also has the ability to enhance security in and around airports. Facial recognition uses algorithms to match physical characteristics against photos and videos of people's faces Earlier this year, facial recognition technology managed to catch an imposter trying to enter the US at the Washington Dulles Airport. The false passport may have been uncaught by the human eye, yet due to the accuracy of the facial recognition technology it managed to help officers catch the imposter and bring him to justice. Facial recognition thus allows officers to identify an individual faster and more accurately than the human eye. Facial recognition uses algorithms to match physical characteristics against photos and videos of people's faces, which have been collected from visas, passports and other sources.   Facial recognition allows officers to identify an individual faster and more accurately than the human eye At airports the use of facial recognition has proved to both enhance security as well as speed up processes such as check-inWhilst some critics may worry about issues of privacy related to the technology, at airports the use of facial recognition has proved to both enhance security as well as speed up processes such as check-in and, in the future, even boarding proceedings. If used correctly and proportionately, facial recognition can help safeguard the public and improve national security on several fronts. Whilst the many benefits of facial recognition are evident, the lack of regulation and understanding of the technology has led to misconception around how it works and what it is used for. Facial recognition technology can match faces in crowded public places against criminal watch lists, and register faces that match with those on criminal watch lists – whilst ignoring everyone else.

Security industry trends to be led by focus on cyber security in 2019
Security industry trends to be led by focus on cyber security in 2019

The Security Industry Association (SIA) looks forward to 2019, and it is apparent that physical security is moving into its most formative years. Changes presented by emerging technology, open systems and growing connectivity among devices and sensors will make a big difference for manufacturers, systems integrators/dealers and end users. With a more open, connected environment come cyber risk and data privacy concerns – which is why, in SIA’s 2019 Security Megatrends, cybersecurity’s impact on the physical security industry ranks number one on the list. Cybersecurity is affecting all areas of the industry landscape, from security implementation to attracting top talent to the workforce. Digital transformation The digital transformation we are experiencing impacts many other parts of the security industry as well, bringing opportunities like evolving identity management and collecting and delivering big data to customers. At this critical point in the industry’s development, it is important to embrace change, leverage disruptive technology in ways that give companies a competitive advantage. To determine this year’s Megatrends, SIA surveyed hundreds of executives from member companies To determine this year’s Megatrends, SIA surveyed hundreds of executives from member companies, along with current and recent Securing New Ground speakers and attendees, to identify which previous trends were still relevant, which trends were no longer as impactful and which broad trends should be added to our report. This year’s Security Megatrends 1. Cybersecurity’s Impact on Physical Security: It is important to prioritise cybersecurity for your business, your customers’ business and the vendors with which you work. This trend calls for continual process improvement and investment. 2. Internet of Things (IoT) and the Big Data Effect: The security industry makes use of IoT, analytics, artificial intelligence (AI), robotics and more, and data is coming from everywhere. The industry now faces the challenge of effectively managing and segmenting this information to be pertinent to the user. 3. Cloud Computing: Cloud platforms and applications are becoming prevalent across security solutions. This technology helps security integrators provide managed services and the advantages of off-site systems and services to customers. 4. Workforce Development: With historically low unemployment, finding skilled employees is a challenge to the whole security industry. Security stakeholders need talent with IT, cybersecurity, AI and even privacy expertise, presenting a need to grow students’ interest in the industry. 5. AI: Research firm Gartner predicts a new “democratisation of AI” that will impact more organisations than ever before. Companies are now testing this technology before offering it to customers and exploring how AI data can be used to improve security threat assessment and response. 6. Emphasis on Data Privacy: Growing connectivity brings new concerns over data privacy. Finding the balance between security and convenience is a dilemma the industry must now address. 7. Move to Service Models: The newest home security technologies are strongly impacting installing companies. Systems integrators must find ways to focus on services customers want and need and move to managed service models to make up revenues. 8. Security Integrated in Smart Environments: As everything becomes connected, smart environments will begin to proliferate. Buildings and cities are becoming more conscious, with connected systems now able to automatically respond to and even anticipate the needs of facility users and citizens. We must continue to find ways to make these environments smarter and safer. 9. Identity of the Future: With facial and voice recognition and biometrics growing in popularity and appeal, how will we enter buildings and access networks tomorrow? The industry will anticipate and adapt to constant technological change in identity and visitor management. 10. Impact of Consumer Electronics Companies: The influx of consumer electronics companies and DIY systems means changing rules and players in the security industry. This disruption presents both challenges and opportunities for security companies.