Video servers (IP transmission) Comparison: Geutebruck, Teleste  (4)

 
Video Inputs
16
6
4
1
Other Inputs
16
--
--
2
Compression Type
M-JPEG
MPEG-4
MPEG-4
H.264/MPEG-4
Network Protocols
TCP/IP
--
--
RTP, UDP, TCP, IP, SAP, RTSP
Interface
Ethernet 10/100/1000 Base-T
--
--
10/100/1000BASE-T
Resolution TVL
704 x 576
--
--
--
Image per second (IPS)
50/60 fps
--
--
30
Data Input
--
Audio Input
--
Alarm Input
--
--
--
No of Other Outputs
--
--
--
1
Control
--
--
--
PTZ

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Latest Video server (IP transmission) case studies

Geutebruck GeViScopes safeguard Gasunie’s gas grid across the Netherlands and Northern Germany
Geutebruck GeViScopes safeguard Gasunie’s gas grid across the Netherlands and Northern Germany

With over 15,000 kilometres of pipeline in the Netherlands and northern Germany, dozens of sites and approximately 1,300 gas receiving stations, Gasunie operates one of the largest high pressure, gas pipeline grids in Europe.  Its network forms the core of the so-called northwest European 'gas roundabout' and its security relies on Geutebruck technology. Gasunie's sites vary greatly in function and size.  Some are very small, remote and rarely visited.  Others occupy several hectares and are occupied by dozens of Gasunie employees and visiting contractors.  The security infrastructure depends on the site and ranges from simple fencing to sophisticated fence systems with perimeter detection systems and CCTV.  "The fundamental requirement at every location is that unauthorised intruders are always identified as fast as possible at the perimeter," explains Reiner Woldring, Gasunie's corporate security advisor.  "Where necessary there are two high fences with alarm systems on the outer fence," adds Herman von Hierden, a member of Gasunie's electrotechnics, instrumentation and process control department.  "That way unauthorised intrusion can be detected even earlier." The CCTV systems operating on 25 sites allow security processes which are aimed at limiting access to authorized staff, such as verifying and tracking intruder alarm reports, to all be coordinated from the 24-hour Groningen control centre. "We need camera pictures for verifying the alarm reports which may need to be followed up by the police or another special guarding service," reports Reiner Woldring.  "For this we need good quality cameras, reliable transmission and storage of camera pictures as well as user-friendly functions for calling up the pictures in the alarm centre." To keep its systems up to date Gasunie operates a rolling programme of infrastructure expansion and modernisation which applies to the security equipment too.  All its cameras are currently managed through a modern Geutebruck GeViScope platform which is fully integrated into the company's own management system.  Local system integrators Alphatron and Strukton Systems have been responsible for upgrading the cameras and remain responsible for the maintenance of the alarm centre systems.  Whenever there is an alarm, control centre staff can immediately replay the recorded footage IP-based systems are now standard across all sites.  "Nowadays we work with a lot fewer cameras per site" explains Herman von Hierden, "and most of them can be remote controlled from the centre." Control centre staff can call up camera images in real time and immediately replay the recorded footage whenever there is an alarm. Automatically controlled lighting has made nocturnal camera surveillance possible even on remote sites. - The challenge on remote sites has always been data connectivity.  "The limited bandwiths available between head office and some of Gasunie's remoter gas pumping locations generate perfect environments for Geutebruck equipment to demonstrate its efficient bandwidth management," grins Koen Pelle, Geutebruck country manager for the Netherlands. Protecting such a nationally and internationally critical infrastructure network involves preparing for everything - including a catastrophic failure which knocks out the Groningen control centre.  For this eventuality Gasunie has set up an equivalent security centre at an undisclosed location elsewhere in the Netherlands.  "Whenever necessary this second centre can be used to take over all duties," assures Reiner Woldring.

Geutebruck’s virtual servers provide unprecedented performance and reliability in a Swiss Casino
Geutebruck’s virtual servers provide unprecedented performance and reliability in a Swiss Casino

When the Grand Casino in Baden in Switzerland upgraded its video security system in 2009 it installed a Geutebruck high availability IP solution with virtual GeViScope platforms and incorporating thirty-five 1.3 Megapixel cameras. The 250-camera system provides a complete video history from all cameras, including the megapixel ones, at full available resolution for 28 days on a 320 Terabyte instant access database.  Two technologies were key to achieving unprecedented performance and reliability.  One is Geutebruck’s own CCTV-optimised video compression process MPEG4CCTV.  This uses standard MPEG-4 compression tools in unusual ways to deliver professional performance and image handling specifically for security users.  MPEG4CCTV systems are not only remarkably fast, delivering top quality video images without latency; but also lean and efficient with low network and storage requirements. The other notable technology is virtualisation. Geutebruck uses virtualisation, in the shape of Microsoft’s Hyper-V tool, to generate multiple virtual GeViScope servers in fail-over cluster formation on a single piece of hardware, thus providing high redundancy but without additional hardware. Consequently, the server room at the Grand Casino Baden is impressive for what is not there! — Less hardware means less power and less emergency capacity on standby; fewer devices mean less waste heat, less air conditioning and lower energy consumption. Together, space, energy and cost savings mean virtualisation significantly reduces the Casino’s total cost of ownership. System design The system’s cameras include a dozen legacy analogue speed domes and a hundred analogue box cameras all now linked to an existing Kat5 Ethernet with CAM2IP video encoders; 35 new 1.3 megapixel cameras and a hundred new VIPCAMs - high resolution day/night IP-cameras. Two Intel servers each incorporating five high performance computers handle all data streams and run 21 virtual GeViScope video system platforms operated in cluster formation.  These record to RAID Level 6 databases mounted on 21 Promise SAS storage systems with sixteen 1TB capacity server disks each.  If - despite all care and cutting-edge technology – something does fail, then the full functionality of the system is immediately automatically re-established without down-time or data loss. The systems' cameras include a dozen legacy analogue speed domes and a hundred analogue box cameras The new megapixel cameras provide improved picture quality along with support for close-ups.  On their 30-inch monitors supervisors can view all 250 cameras and can pull up live and recorded footage of identical quality in milliseconds.  Despite its technical complexity, supervisors find the system simplicity itself to operate as the user-friendly GSCView display and operating software is extensively customised for each application, optimizing operator comfort and convenience.  “Virtualisation offers end-users significant advantages,” reports Carmen Lahr, Geutebruck corporate communications director. “Not only does it enable redundancy and high availability to be achieved without hardware duplication; but using hardware resources more efficiently like this reduces the installation’s need for space, power and cooling, and that cuts the system’s overall energy consumption by 30-40%.”

Geutebruck provides high security for the European Space Centre in French Guiana
Geutebruck provides high security for the European Space Centre in French Guiana

The ‘Centre Spatial Guyanais' (CSG) otherwise known as the Guiana Space Centre near Kourou on the Caribbean coast of French Guiana is the spaceport which France shares with the European Space Agency (ESA). Besides being the launch site for the Ariane rockets which are designed and built by partners in 12 European countries, Kourou also provides launch facilities for the ESA, the French space agency CNES, and from 2011 Russian Soyuz rockets too. - The first Soyuz launch from the site having taken place on 21st October 2011 when the first pair of satellites for Europe's Galileo global navigationGeViRAID system were put into orbit. Geutebruck France has been involved in providing a high security environment for the centre since 2006 when a new multi-phase security design was drawn up and the initial contracts awarded. The first complete Geutebruck video security system was handed over in April 2009, with the second large four-year project completed in partnership with the Italian company Telematic Solutions (Milan) in December of the following year. At the moment Geutebruck have three other security projects in hand: the CSG harbour in Kourou; the new launch complex for the Russian Soyuz rockets; and the whole of the new Vega launch site. - The Vega is a new smaller European rocket which is scheduled to make its debut in 2011. - Once these projects have been completed almost all the spaceport will be protected with Geutebruck systems The space centre's extensive site covers 850 square kilometres. Besides its launch facilities are various satellite and rocket assembly buildings and a plant for producing solid rocket propellant. Geographically speaking the space centre is situated in a very favourable location. On the one hand, being near the coast means that there is only a short journey for valuable payloads which arrive by ship, and on the other, that rockets are launched over water rather than over populated areas. Its position close to the equator ensures that rockets get maximum assistance from the earth's rotation and makes it simpler and less costly to manoeuvre satellites into geosynchronous orbit. However, favourable though the location may be in some respects, its hot sticky equatorial climate is a considerable challenge for electronic hardware. Environmental problems including mould, small animals, insects, high humidity, salt water and strong sunlight mean that preventative measures are required against corrosion, condensation, the gradual loosening of electrical connections, galvanic coupling and the risk of dirt causing bad contacts, and so on.  Consequently Geutebruck has had to ensure that there cannot be any condensation inside its cabinets or devices; that there is no possible ingress for insects; that all moving parts are sealed off from the external climate; and that PVC materials are selected for their resistance to moisture and mould.    The Guiana Space Centre in the Caribbean is using Geutebrucks' video security systems The space centre uses Geutebruck video systems for typical security tasks - for example surveillance of the 35 kilometer-long perimeter fence - and also for monitoring processes and procedures.  Currently the equipment in service includes around 43 19" racks, 80 GeViScope high end video system platforms, 42 GeViRAID systems, 10 evaluation stations and 10 viewer stations combined with monitor walls which are made to meet specific technical requirements. There are 670 cameras, 1200 Helios floodlights and a140 Terabyte database.  The space centre is a multi-national, multi-cultural environment where staff from many different companies work together but which has to be organised with military precision. As the host agency CNES is responsible for the design and quality assurance of the facilities. Both its project managers and the CSG end-users have expressed their satisfaction with Geutebruck's professional co-operation and with the performance of its video systems, and this sentiment is clearly reflected in Geutebruck's current order book.