Teleste ACE8 -  the first DOCSIS 3.1 node
Teleste ACE8 - the first DOCSIS 3.1 node

The first DOCSIS 3.1 node The ACE8 fully meets requirements for DOCSIS 3.1 and DVB-C2. Downstream frequency band is reaching up to 1.2 GHz which ensures fulfilment of all future bandwidth needs. Upstream is flexible and it can be easily updated to 200 MHz.  The node is based on fixed receiver and modular US transmitter, and it uses high performance GaN hybrid in output amplifier. This makes its output ranges especially wide and results in enhanced noise resilience. Sleek, yet robust The ACE8 is a small, user-friendly node with intelligent features. With compact size and sleek housing the node is easily and effortlessly fit in European style street cabins. The advanced fibre organiser provides convenient location for fibre pigtails and protects the fibres against damage. Connectors and adapters are held in place in the fibre tray by universal type holders the ensure compatibility with variety of existing connectors and adapters. Wireless configuration The ACE8 can be controlled via an intuitive touch screen user interface for tablets. Remote connectivity is also possible via third-party applications through SNMP.  Included USB and wireless Bluetooth® connectivity makes the node easily configurable even on the site. Intelligent in operations The ACE8 is part of Teleste’s intelligent networks concept that aims at reducing network operating costs while securing high service quality. The node is equipped with an intelligent transponder which enables advanced management features such as automatic adjustment and configuration. The ACE8 also has automatic ingress control to guarantee the quality of upstream signal. The intelligent features significantly reduce need for manual maintenance, and help cut down service outages.

Add to Compare

Browse CCTV Fiber Optic Transmitters & Telemetry

Fibre optics, telemetry receivers, transmitters, transceivers - Expert commentary

Live-streaming mobile surveillance takes cameras to the action
Live-streaming mobile surveillance takes cameras to the action

Video surveillance across the world is growing exponentially and its major application is in both public safety and law enforcement. Traditionally, it has been fixed surveillance where cameras provide live streams from fixed cameras situated in what is considered strategic locations. But they are limited in what they can see given by their very definition of being "fixed." The future of video surveillance includes the deployment of more mobile video surveillance with the benefits it offers. Instead of fixed cameras, this is the ability to live stream from mobile devices on the move such as body-worn cams, drones, motorbikes, cars, helicopters and in some cases, even dogs!Sending drones into the air, for example for missing people or rescue missions, is much more cost-effective than deploying helicopters Advantages of mobile surveillance The advantage of mobile surveillance is that the camera can go to where the action is, rather than relying on the action going to where the camera is. Also, sending drones into the air, for example for missing people or rescue missions, is much more cost-effective than deploying helicopters. The ability to live stream video from cars and helicopters in high-speed pursuits can be used to take some of the operational issues from the first responders on the ground and share that “life and death” responsibility with the operational team leaders back in the command centre. This allows the first responders in the pursuit vehicle to focus on minimising risk while staying in close proximity of the fleeing vehicle, with direction from a higher authority who can see for themselves in real time the issues that are being experienced, and direct accordingly. In addition to showing video live stream from a pursuit car or motorcycle, by using inbuilt GPS tracking, the video can be displayed on a map in real time, allowing a command chief to better utilise additional resource and where to deploy them, through the use of displaying mapping information with real time video feed. It allows police chiefs to make better informed decisions in highly-charged environments. The 4G phone network can now be used with compressed video to live stream cost effectively Application in emergency situations The same is true of first responders in many different emergency situations. Mobile surveillance opens up a new area of efficiencies that previously was impossible to achieve. For example, special operations can wear action body-worn cameras when doing raids, fire departments can live stream from emergency situations with both thermal and daylight cameras, and paramedics can send video streams back to hospitals allowing doctors to remotely diagnose and prepare themselves for when patients arrive at the hospital. How can special operations and emergency first responders live stream video from a mobile camera with the issues of weight, reliability and picture-quality being considered? H265 mobile video compression Law enforcement insists on secure transmissions, and it is possible to encrypt video to the highest level of security available in the public domain The 4G phone network can now be used with compressed video to live stream cost effectively. The issue of course is that 4G is not always reliable. Soliton Systems has mitigated this risk of low mobile quality in certain areas, by building an H265 mobile video compression device that can use multiple SIM cards from different cellular providers simultaneously. H265 is the latest compression technique for video, that is 50% more effective than conventional H264, and coupling this with using multiple “bonded” SIM cards provides a highly reliable connection for live-streaming high-quality HD video. The 400-gram device with an internal battery can be connected to a small action cam, and can live-stream simultaneously over at least three different cellular providers, back to a command centre. Latency is typically less than a second, and new advance improvements are looking to reduce that latency further. Encrypted video transmission What about security? Law enforcement insists on secure transmissions, and it is possible to encrypt video to the highest level of security available in the public domain, i.e. AES256.What about integration into existing video infrastructure at the command centre? It is not untypical for a police force to have an existing video management system (VMS) at their command centre such as Milestone System’s Xprotect. The Soliton range of products are ONVIF-compliant, a standard used by video surveillance cameras for interoperability, allowing cameras and video devices that are ONVIF-compliant to simply “plug&play” into existing video management systems. These mobile transmitters are deployed with law enforcement and first responders across the globe. Their ability to provide secure, full HD quality and highly-reliable video streaming within a small unit, and to enable it to be integrated into the current eco-system that is already installed at the receiving end, has made them a favourite choice with many companies and government agencies.

Why live video streaming is critical for safer and smarter cities
Why live video streaming is critical for safer and smarter cities

The term “smart city” gets thrown around a lot nowadays, but as different technologies that strive to be defined in this way are adopted by different countries globally, the meaning of this phrase gets lost in translation. The simplest way to define a “smart city” is that it is an urban area that uses different types of data collecting sensors to manage assets and resources efficiently. One of the most obvious types of “data collecting sensor” is the video camera, whether that camera is part of a city’s existing CCTV infrastructure, a camera in a shopping centre or even a police car’s dash camera. The information gathered by video cameras can be used with two purposes in mind, firstly: making people’s lives more efficient, for example by managing traffic, and secondly (and arguably more importantly): making people’s lives safer. Live streaming video all the time, everywhere In the smart and safe city, traditional record-only video cameras are of limited use. Yes, they can be used to collect video which can be used for evidence after a crime has taken place, but there is no way that this technology could help divert cars away from an accident to avoid traffic building up, or prevent a crime from taking place in the first place. However, streaming live video from a camera that isn’t connected to an infrastructure via costly fibre optic cabling has proven challenging for security professionals, law enforcement and city planners alike. This is because it isn’t viable to transmit video reliably over cellular networks, in contrast to simply receiving it. Video transmission challenges Transmitting video normally results in freezing and buffering issues which can hinder efforts to fight crime and enable flow within a city, as these services require real-time, zero latency video without delays. Therefore, special technology is required that copes with poor and varying bandwidths to allow a real-time view of any scene where cameras are present to support immediate decision making and smart city processes. The information gatheredby video cameras can beused to make people’s lives more efficient, and to make people’s lives safer There are many approaches to transmitting video over cellular. We’ve developed a specialist codec (encoding and decoding algorithm) that can provide secure and reliable video over ultra-low bandwidths and can therefore cope when networks become constrained. Another technique, which is particularly useful if streaming video from police body worn cameras or dash cams that move around, is to create a local wireless “bubble” at the scene, using Wi-Fi or mesh radio systems to provide local high-bandwidth communications that can communicate with a central location via cellular or even satellite communications. Enhanced city surveillance Live video streaming within the smart and safe city’s infrastructure means that video’s capabilities can go beyond simple evidence recording and evolve into a tool that allows operations teams to monitor and remediate against incidents as they are happening. This can be taken one step further with the deployment of facial recognition via live streaming video. Facial recognition technology can be added on to any video surveillance camera that is recording at a high enough quality to identify faces. The technology works by capturing video, streaming the live video back to a control centre and matching faces against any watch lists that the control centre owns. Importantly, the data of people who aren’t on watch lists is not stored by the technology. Identifying known criminals This technology can work to make the city safer in a number of ways. For example, facial recognition could spot a known drug dealer in a city centre where they weren’t supposed to be, or facial recognition could identify if a group of known terror suspects were visiting the same location at the same time, and this would send an alert to the police. Facial recognition technology captures and streams live back to a control centre, matching faces against any watch lists that the control centre owns In an ideal world where the police had an automated, electronic workflow, the police officer nearest to the location of the incident would be identified by GPS and would be told by the control room where to go and what to do. Most police forces aren’t quite at this technological level yet, and would probably rely on communicating via radio in order to send the nearest response team to the scene. As well as this, shopping centres could create a database from analogue records of known shoplifters to identify criminals as soon as they entered the building. This would be even more effective if run co-operatively between all shopping centres and local businesses in an area, and would not only catch any known shoplifters acting suspiciously, but would act as a deterrent from shoplifting in the first place. Live streaming for police As mentioned above, live streaming video from CCTV cameras can help the police fight crime more proactively rather than reactively. This can be enhanced even further if combined with live streaming video from police car dash cams and police body worn cameras. If video was streamed from all of these sources to a central HQ, such as a police operations centre, the force would be able to have full situational awareness throughout an incident. This would mean that, if need be, officers could be advised on the best course of action, and additional police or other emergency services could be deployed instantly if needed. Incorporated with facial recognition, this would also mean that police could instantly identify if they were dealing with known criminals or terrorists. Whilst they would still have to confirm the identity of the person with questioning or by checking their identification, this is still more streamlined than describing what a person looks like over a radio and then ops trying to manually identify if the person is on a watch list. The smart, safe city is possible today – for one, if live video streaming capabilities are deployed they can enable new levels of flow in the city. With the addition of facial recognition, cities will be safer than ever before and law enforcement and security teams will be able to proactively stop crime before it happens by deterring criminal activity from taking place at all.

Surge protection for security installations: 2017 saw increased investment
Surge protection for security installations: 2017 saw increased investment

In 2017, DITEK saw how power surges from the many natural disasters that took place damaged many businesses. In a natural disaster, or even everyday business operations, a facility’s entire investment in security, life safety and surveillance systems technology can be disabled or rendered useless in a few seconds. Surge protection solutions can mitigate those risks and protect security investments. Proactive approach to risk mitigation Throughout 2017, we also witnessed a change in how enterprises view surge protection, which included how investments are being made in surge protection to protect valuable security, life safety and surveillance systems, while also reducing downtime, manpower costs, liability vulnerabilities, and possibly compliance issues that can force businesses to actually cease operations. Effective security management is about mitigating risks. But risks cannot be mitigated without a proactive approach. Enterprises and integrators, who take the time to assess risk and to develop a strategy to incorporate effective detection, deter and response criteria to protect physical assets will be successful in 2018. 2018 and beyond That strategy includes designing surge protection into new security systems, while also adding surge protection to existing systems. Enterprises and security integrators who implement a surge protection strategy during security planning processes – or after – will be exercising prevention and mitigation, and they will be successful in 2018 and beyond.  Surge protection devices have an untapped potential for enterprise surveillance and security systems In 2017, Ditek continued to offer security end users a solid surge protection solution. We also successfully educated system integrators, who are seeking value-added products or services to incorporate into their portfolios, on the importance of surge protection devices. Educating security integrators We believe that surge protection devices have an untapped potential for enterprise video surveillance and security systems, because they can and do meet safety and security challenges that have been rarely identified in the past. We are looking forward to 2018, when we will continue to develop new surge protection products – including a new product engineered to protect up to twelve individual fuel dispensers, which is critical to the financial operation of convenience stores. We will also continue to educate security integrators about the importance of including surge protection in the design/build RFP, to not only secure an enterprise’s valuable security equipment, but also to help integrators to differentiate their capabilities and knowledge from the competition.

Latest Teleste Corporation news

APRR Group selects Teleste’s S-VMX video security solution for motorway safety and surveillance in France
APRR Group selects Teleste’s S-VMX video security solution for motorway safety and surveillance in France

APRR (Autoroutes Paris Rhin Rhône) Group has selected Teleste’s S-VMX Video Management System for upgrading its motorway safety and surveillance infrastructure. The system will be implemented by a consortium composed of Teleste and ENGIE Ineo, a part of worldwide renowned energy provider, The ENGIE group. Teleste S-VMX video security system APRR Group, a subsidiary of Eiffage, manages motorways and toll structures under concessions awarded by the French State. Under the terms of its concession agreements, the Group also invests heavily in its 2,323 km network in order to improve travel conditions and satisfy customers’ new mobility requirements. Teleste’s S-VMX system will be in charge of monitoring and securing the East & South of France Motorways network, including the motorway routes as well as car parks and rest areas. The project is expected to be delivered during 2019 and 2020, and the contract scope includes a 10-year maintenance agreement. Security and operations control systems Security and operations control systems are becoming increasingly complex as they are expected to process large amounts of information in real-time. Teleste’s S-VMX video surveillance and S-AWARE situational awareness platforms enable the building of security systems that will evolve alongside the changing needs of public authorities. In addition to the powerful video core, the systems can control large amounts of information from multiple sources within the operating environment to ensure that the right information is available to the right people, when and where needed, and that the correct action is taken promptly whenever unexpected situations occur.

Teleste's S-AWARE platform selected to enhance travel safety across the Helsinki metro system
Teleste's S-AWARE platform selected to enhance travel safety across the Helsinki metro system

Teleste Corporation reveals that its S-AWARE platform has been selected by Helsinki City Transport to drive improved situational awareness and safer travelling across the Helsinki metro system. The deployment of the platform will be started in 2019 and the project will be carried out in several phases and be completed at the end of the year 2020. The total value of the deployment will be more than two million euros. “We are delighted to expand our long-term cooperation with Helsinki City Transport on developing smart and safe public transport in the Helsinki metropolitan area. The rapidly growing urbanisation challenges public transport operators throughout the world to find solutions that can provide enhanced operational control and tools to increase safety in public places. Adding situational awareness through intelligent public transport systems is one of the key methods the operators can use to reach the target,” stated Esa Harju, Head of Teleste’s Video Security and Information Business unit. Prioritizing passenger safety Every year, over 80 million passengers and commuters enjoy travelling in the system, which forms the northernmost metro in the world During recent years, the Helsinki Metro has undergone several upgrades and major extensions. Today, it includes more than 20 stations in Helsinki and its neighbouring cities and serves the capital region of Finland with hundreds of thousands of daily rides. Every year, over 80 million passengers and commuters enjoy travelling in the system, which forms the northernmost metro in the world. Keeping the safety and security of the passengers and the entire metro system in mind, Helsinki City Transport is adopting Teleste’s S-AWARE platform to develop their response capabilities and to ensure a high service level, e.g., during possible security failures, alerts and states of emergency, as well as in other complex or critical situations. Safe and attractive travelling experience “Helsinki Metro is being developed to bring seamless mobility to the growing metropolitan area. At Helsinki City Transport, our mission is to continue building an increasingly effective and highly functional metro system that provides a safe and attractive travelling experience for our customers in their everyday life,“ told Ville Lehmuskoski, CEO, Helsinki City Transport. Teleste S-AWARE platform has been designed to help enhance efficiency, safety and security in public transportation, airports, critical infrastructure The Teleste S-AWARE platform has been designed to help enhance efficiency, safety and security in public transportation, airports, critical infrastructure and in the governmental sector. The platform works by collecting real-time information from various subsystems, data sources and sensory inputs, and it displays a unified and real-time view of the whole operational infrastructure. This provides for the improved understanding of what is happening in the surroundings and creates grounds for sharp and efficient decision-making. Smart incident management In addition, the platform can be used to pre-define automated operating procedures for efficient and smart incident management, hence ensuring that corrective action is immediately taken when unexpected incidents occur. The advanced reporting, debriefing and training tools ensure that the system can be used to project future events and be prepared for exceptional situations. Teleste’s deployment to Helsinki City Transport will also enable efficient use of the system for multiple other operators, including the police, fire and rescue forces, Helsinki Regional Transport Authority, and the cities of Helsinki and Espoo. Delivering the right information to the right people at the right time, the system is harnessed with high information and data security that guarantees protection from any unauthorised access.

Secured IP Link by Teleste protects IP communication and security systems from unauthorized access
Secured IP Link by Teleste protects IP communication and security systems from unauthorized access

Teleste Corporation introduces a new Secured IP Link to its portfolio of security video products. The link has been designed to protect different kinds of connected IP devices, especially IP cameras, from unauthorised access and use. As placing an IP device outside of the safe perimeter poses a potential risk for the operational network, the Secured IP Link can be used to prevent intruders from accessing the network from the direction of the edge device. The new Secured IP Link includes several built-in features to protect the IP/Ethernet communication. For example, it allows monitoring of the device for unauthorised opening or breaking into its housing. Detachment of the Ethernet cable and tampering of the optical link can be supervised and assigned to alarms and protective actions, and the operator can also encrypt information to and from the link as it is transmitted within the network. The Secured IP Link provides: Gigabit Ethernet capacity Compact size transmitter, which can be fitted inside the camera housing Automatic link shutdown in case of tampering or alarms Possibility to restore the link/unlock alarms remotely Encrypted communication between edge device and server Transmitter-receiver signaling based on proprietary Ethernet protocol IP Link offers reliable operation The link is designed for reliable operation in 24/7 use with a wide operating temperature range of -34 °C to +74 °C. Due to its changeable SFPs (small form-factor pluggable transceivers), the link allows extended transmission distances and supports various networking and cabling requirements, including both optical and CAT. It is also compliant with the mechanics of the Teleste CFO family of fibre optic video products.