Video servers (IP transmission) Comparison: Bosch, Axis Communications  (4)

 
Alarm Input
--
--
Compression Type
H.264/M-JPEG
--
--
MPEG, JPEG
Network Protocols
IPv4, IPv6, UDP, TCP, HTTP, HTTPS, RTP/ RTCP, IGMP V2/V3, ICMP, ICMPv6, RTSP, FTP, Telnet, ARP, DHCP, NTP (SNTP), SNMP (V1, MIB-II), 802.1x, DNS, DNSv6, DDNS (DynDNS.org, selfHOST.de, noip.com), SMTP, iSCSI, UPnP (SSDP), DiffServ (QoS), LLDP, SOAP, Dropbo
--
--
TCP/IP, HTTP, FTP, SMTP, NTP, ARP, BOOTP
Interface
10/100 Base-T, auto-sensing, half/full duplex, RJ45
--
--
10base-T Ethernet / 100base-T Fast Ethernet
Resolution TVL
1080p
--
--
704 x 576 (PAL)
Image per second (IPS)
30
--
--
25
Accessories
--
Video Server Rack
Video Encoder Chassis
--
Video Inputs
--
--
--
4
Other Inputs
--
--
--
4
No of Other Outputs
--
--
--
1
Control
--
--
--
PTZ - several types supported.
System Requirements
--
--
--
Win 95/98/NT, Linux, UNIX, MAC. IE v4 with ActiveX control or Netscape Nav v4.

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Latest Video server (IP transmission) case studies

Aimetis CCTV software selected for optimised security surveillance at Whitby Mental Health Centre
Aimetis CCTV software selected for optimised security surveillance at Whitby Mental Health Centre

Customer profile Whitby Mental Health Centre (WMHC) is a specialty psychiatric hospital which is focused on providing specialised mental health programmes for inpatients and outpatients for a population of 2.8 million residents in an area extending from the east of the City of Toronto, Canada. WMHC employs 1100 staff and has an annual operating budget of approximately $88 million.Technology & integration Aimetis Symphony™ Client & Server Axis 241Q encoders IQinVision 703 network cameras Analogue Panasonic WV-CW864 PTZ Panasonic WV-NF284 network camera  Results Increased scalability of security personnel Improved image quality Greater value extracted from PTZ cameras through auto-tracking capability SummaryWhitby Mental Health Centre selects Aimetis Symphony™ Integrated Intelligent Video Management Software as its video platform for analogue and network cameras while leveraging video analytics to automatically control PTZ cameras, increasing the scalability of security personnel.Business challenge Aimetis Symphony was selected due to its ability to support Axis, Panasonic and IQinVision network cameras concurrently  Whitby Mental Health Centre (WMHC) includes a forensic programme, an 85 bed medium and minimum security programme for persons subject to detention under the Criminal Code of Canada and the Mental Health Act. Skyrocketing occupancy, from 70% in 2006 to 95%, had left the facility with the need to expand its video coverage. WMHC wanted to slowly migrate to an IP based deployment while still making use of their existing analogue cameras. The need to have an intelligent video system with auto PTZ tracking capability was required as timely manual control of the PTZ cameras was not always guaranteed.SolutionAimetis Symphony™ Intelligent Video Management Software was selected due to its open architecture and ability to support Axis, Panasonic and IQinVision network cameras concurrently. To achieve control of the analogue pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) cameras, an Axis 241Q encoder was used to interface with the analogue camera and IP network, allowing Symphony™ to send commands across the network and automatically control the cameras as needed. Symphony™ was configured to automatically zoom in when people were detected in areas which were designated as off-limits, such as around the garbage bins outside the hospital. Megapixel cameras were also deployed which gave superior image quality in strategic parts of the hospital where high image detail was a must. These are especially useful in aiding security personnel in the detection and prevention of violent behaviour or persons going missing. "Aimetis allowed is to leverage our analogue investment while adding high value features such as auto-PTZ control and megapixel cameras," says John Premzell, Fire and Safety Officer, WMHC.

Bosch provides IP CCTV solution to protect University of Sussex
Bosch provides IP CCTV solution to protect University of Sussex

Reliable technology from Bosch Security Systems is playing a principal role in a new CCTV installation at the University of Sussex as it extends the IP camera network to cover further areas of the university campus. The University of Sussex is a single site campus covering 280 acres on the outskirts of Brighton. Its CCTV system, specified originally in 2003 by the university in conjunction with specialist installers A.M Fire and Security, is a Bosch-based solution primarily based on dome cameras to cover critical areas across the entire site. As Trevor Clifton-Sprigg of A.M Fire and Security explains: "There are 120 cameras in total, with 35 external cameras, most of which are domes from Bosch's EnviroDome and FlexiDome series. The system runs over IP, with the use of Videojet 10, Vip  X1, Vip X2 and Vip X1600 video servers which migrate the existing analogue cameras to IP." EnviroDomes are an integral part of Bosch's AutoDome range, featuring its innovative motion tracking capability Auto Track. Rugged in design and ideally suited for perimeter surveillance, car parks, and other similar outdoor applications, EnviroDomes feature Day/night cameras that automatically switch from colour to monochrome when light levels decrease to give extra sensitivity, whilst high-resolution cameras with optical zoom of up to 25x capture the finest details. The cameras are controlled and monitored centrally at the University's security office in a building known as York House, with resilience monitoring at a separate location should a problem occur. "In addition," Trevor continues, "there are multiple client PCs at the individual buildings running VIDOS viewing software allowing each building user to view their own cameras and recordings." "The recording equipment consists of two Dell servers (each capable of handling up to 64 cameras), which are connected to the University's Storage Attached Network (SAN), with Bosch VIDOS networked video recorder (NVR) software (which can handle an unlimited number of cameras and user) to manage the recordings. Each PC uses graphical maps for fast, simple, access to cameras around the site." The University of Sussex received its Royal Charter in August 1961 and 40 years on, the University has become a leading teaching and research institution, renowned for its research excellence. Situated on the edge of the Sussex Downs, in a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the University campus is described as a large, self-contained village, with lecture theatres, seminar rooms, libraries, accommodation, restaurants, bars, shops and sports facilities all within easy walking distance. The security challenges facing the University are not untypical of a campus site. Antisocial and criminal behaviour is not uncommon and can take place in the car parks, within teaching buildings or the student union areas, and access to the campus is open to would-be thieves.  Reliable technology from Bosch Security Systems plays a principal role in a new CCTV installation at the University of Sussex as it extends the IP camera network to cover further areas of the university campus Roger Morgan, Head of Security at the University explains: "The University has a good rating for security in the National Student Survey and this will in part be due to the presence of our surveillance system which is used very successfully in conjunction with security offices on the ground. It helps us to monitor activities on the campus and prevent incursion from unwanted visitors." "As an example of how beneficial the system is, recorded CCTV images (and work by our officers on patrol) led to the detention of some youths who were targeting our site and stealing bicycles from the cycle racks over a period of days." "We constantly review the system to ensure that we have the best coverage in all the key areas. As a University, changes are often made to how the buildings are used, and new buildings being constructed always necessitate a review of internal and external surveillance. The latest change to the system involved the addition of cameras to extend surveillance to a newly-built student residence." "The new building is effectively a satellite site on the other side of the main road, on the boundary of the campus. Cameras will cover the internal and external areas of the new site, including the subway between the campus and the halls of residence." Roger was previously Head of Operations for Gwent Police and has extensive experience of CCTV from his work with local authorities to establish and develop systems. "The University has a good system," he continues, "and technically we cannot get much better." "The only way we can improve the system is to develop operationally - become more proactive in our approach to monitoring rather than reacting to an incident. There are many benefits of this system that I look forward to exploiting, like the possibility of facial recognition technology to spot known people who might target the university as walk-in thieves. The only limitations we might currently face come from not knowing what the system is capable of."

Axis network cameras hitch a ride on Madrid's buses
Axis network cameras hitch a ride on Madrid's buses

9,000 surveillance cameras will be installed across Madrid's public bus serviceThe Municipal Transport Company of Madrid (EMT) has chosen Axis Communications, the global leader in the network video market, to deliver network surveillance cameras for Madrid's public bus service. EMT has chosen Axis to help support its aim to become Europe's best public transport company. The €20 million project will involve the installation of more than 9,000 cameras in 2,300 buses. The surveillance system includes high resolution real time recording and monitoring, and also features a panic button which is connected to EMT's Central Alarm Station. In the event of an emergency the Control Centre Operator can notify the relevant emergency service. Each bus also includes GPS so it is easy to locate the bus quickly. The network surveillance cameras have already been installed in 400 buses, and it's expected that all buses will support the technology by the end of this year. The tender was won by a consortium formed by Spanish IT and security companies - GRUPO ETRA, IECISA and PLETTAC who presented a project based on Axis network cameras and video encoders. Each bus will include three AXIS M3113-R network cameras and one AXIS Q7401 video encoderAxis has supplied cameras that are robust, easy to install and compact, yet also deliver high resolution images and include vibration resistance and tampering alarms. Each bus will include three - AXIS M3113-R network cameras and one AXIS Q7401 video encoder. The cameras support SVGA (800x600) resolution, which provides enough detail to make it possible to identify people or objects. The cameras also offer H.264 and motion JPG compression formats. H.264 compression optimises bandwidth use (critical for 3G mobile communications) and storage requirements by considerably reducing the binary speed. The cameras also support standard Power over Ethernet and can be integrated with other devices and security systems. Juan Luis Brizuela, Axis Communications Iberia Country Manager said: "This project presented us with a challenge which resulted in a new range of cameras that are well suited to the demands of public transport. We look forward to continuing to work with the Municipal Transport Company of Madrid this year and completing Europe's leading transport surveillance solution." Ignacio Uría, Head of the VEA System Implementation Project (Security Department of EMT) said: "For this pioneering project, it has been very important to be able to rely on a camera vendor such as Axis Communications, which has demonstrated a proven ability to support its customers closely. Axis took full account of our previous experience with onboard video surveillance and the specifications of the bus fleet. The network cameras are ideally suited to our project's objectives, and we believe that, in view of the similarities between urban bus transport systems, they could be well-suited to the majority of transport systems in Spain, or the world."