Understanding the security needs of small shops
Understanding the security needs of small shops

Complete solutions for small businesses using Advantage Line products from BoschFollowing on from our last article on security for small shops, we look at how Advantage Line products from Bosch fulfill all the surveillance needs of small offices. Choose between familiar analogue solutions or increasingly popular network IP solutioncs. A secure small office.For small offices, it's important for staff to feel safe and to keep a watch out for people pretending to be genuine visitors. Security starts in the parking area of the office. This can be guarded by one or two infrared dome cameras or IP 200 Series infrared bullet cameras, ideal for helping spot any suspicious activity. Here, cameras with Day/Night capability ensure the best quality, round-the-clock surveillance. An additional infrared dome camera can be fitted outside the entrance door to observe visitors, with a monitor at the reception desk to identify guests.Inside the office at the reception area, a discreet dome color camera keeps an unobtrusive eye on the comings and goings of visitors. Alternatively, a fixed-body camera can be used as more of a deterrent, making it more obvious that surveillance is installed on the premises. To heighten the deterrent factor further, a 19" confrontational monitor adds an obvious statement.Enhancing overall securitySmall offices often have an area between entrance and reception that is open to the public, where people can sit or stand while waiting for an appointment. Here, one or more ceiling-mounted overview cameras greatly enhance overall security. Again dome or fixed-body color cameras can be used depending on personal choice.A video recorder, such as the Bosch 600 Series makes the perfect system manager for an analog system. It displays playback and recorded video from up to 16 cameras at a single location, and can even stream live video over the internet to a device such as a smartphone. If the system uses IP cameras, video recording can be made to central storage on a network attached storage (NAS) device. Recordings can also be safeguarded by taking advantage of the IP cameras' internal SD-card capability, capturing video directly on the camera. Cameras can also be linked to a PC using Bosch Video Client, which is supplied free for systems with up to 16 cameras.Optimal security on a limited budgetAdvantage Line is ideal for businesses looking for optimal security on a limited budget. Delivering professional performance at an affordable price, the products offer the trusted Bosch quality and reliability. And they also deliver outstanding image quality. They are designed to satisfy the demands of both installers and customers of smaller security installations, combining ease-of-installation and ease-of-use with just the right amount of features.

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Bosch recording Station Appliance
Bosch recording Station Appliance

It combines network video recorder (NVR) server, storage array, client workstation and integrated video management software in a ready-to-go ‘system in a box’. Installation, set-up and operation are so simple that no certification or special training is required. High performance, minimal storage costs With real-time recording of SD (Standard Definition), HD (High Definition) and Megapixel video sources at resolutions up to 2048 x 1536 (3 MP), the BRS Appliance delivers superb image clarity and detail. It supports a variety of compression technologies including H.264 Main Profile, ensuring high performance while keeping storage costs low. Centralised system management The BRS Appliance interfaces with a variety of your security and building management systems including fire and access panels, ATM and POS terminals, and number plate capture and video content analysis solutions. It provides quick and easy access to information from anywhere in the network, even over remote, low bandwidth WAN connections. A convenient, scalable and user-friendly interface allows various locations to be monitored simultaneously. Secure connections For high security installations, the BRS Appliance has several features that make it ideal. They include an automatic log-off, with a configurable time interval of inactivity, to increase protection against unauthorized access. Also, two different pre- and post-alarm recording times can be set for each camera, while audio can be configured by event. Extending potential The BRS Appliance is fully compatible with our DiBos recording solution, enabling you to easily extend existing systems to support Bosch H.264 SD and HD IP cameras – providing a future-proof migration path. To ensure you find a solution that fits your needs several models are available, including both stand-alone ‘all-in-one’ and rack-mounted server units. Key applications Banks Retail Schools Fuelling stations

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Affordable video solutions for popular applications
Affordable video solutions for popular applications

From the Bosch small business portfolio of professional CCTV productsMany small applications - such as shops and retail stores, pharmacies, gas stations, schools and small offices - often lack CCTV systems of sufficient quality for reliable surveillance. Not so with Bosch small business products. Covering analogue, IP network and HD (High Definition) systems, they offer great value for money, with professional performance and great imaging quality at very competitive prices.Typical small analogue video solutionProviding extensive flexibility, an analogue solution could combine WZ Series integrated infrared (IR) dome and bullet cameras, Indoor MiniDomes and our Video Recorder 400 Series. Making perfect standalone, non-networked systems, our analogue products ensure excellent image quality in difficult lighting, and are great for new installations or when complementing existing analogue components.Typical small IP video solutionFor anyone wanting to go digital with small network systems, the Bosch IP 200 Series cameras are an obvious choice, with lots of different models to cover a wide range of applications / locations. Options include indoor fixed-body, dome and IR dome models and outdoor IR bullet camera. Bosch network video systems offer superior convenience, cost-effectiveness and overall efficiency. Using local area networks or even the Internet, they provide extra control over CCTV systems with improved ease of operation and centralised management.Typical small HD video solutionIdeal for new installations, an example small HD video solution could comprise fixed-body and dome high definition cameras from the Bosch IP 200 Series. These cameras are perfect for applications requiring fine detail and for people preferring the coverage offered by the widescreen image format. To ensure true HD imaging, each component is specifically designed for HD technology - HD-optimised from scene to screen.Now everyone can afford the bestBosch small business solutions carry the same high quality and reliability as any product in the Bosch portfolio, as the standard 3-year warranty guarantees. Installation, set-up and operation are all easy and, with minimal servicing, time and costs are kept to a minimum. Also, as they are available at local distributors, choosing the right-fit solution has never been easier.With such a comprehensive offering of cameras, video management options and accessories, there's a Bosch small business solution to fit virtually any application - at an affordable price.  

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Digital video recorders (DVRs) - Expert commentary

A three-point plan for enhancing business video surveillance
A three-point plan for enhancing business video surveillance

Cyber threats hit the headlines every day; however digital hazards are only part of the security landscape. In fact, for many organisations - physical rather than virtual security will remain the burning priority. Will Liu, Managing Director of TP-Link UK, explores the three key elements that companies must consider when implementing modern-day business surveillance systems.  1) Protecting more than premises Video surveillance systems are undoubtedly more important than ever before for a huge number of businesses across the full spectrum of public and private sector, manufacturing and service industries. One simple reason for this is the increased use of technology within those businesses. Offices, workshops, and other facilities house a significant amount of valuable and expensive equipment - from computers, and 3D printers to specialised machinery and equipment. As a result, workplaces are now a key target for thieves, and ensuring the protection of such valuable assets is a top priority. A sad reality is that some of those thieves will be employees themselves. Video surveillance system Of course, video surveillance is often deployed to combat that threat alone, but actually, its importance goes beyond theft protection. With opportunist thieves targeting asset-rich sites more regularly, the people who work at these sites are in greater danger too. Effective and efficient surveillance is imperative not just for physical asset protection, but also for the safety From this perspective, effective and efficient surveillance is imperative not just for physical asset protection, but also for the safety of colleagues as well. Organisations need to protect the people who work, learn or attend the premises. A video surveillance system is, therefore, a great starting point for companies looking to deter criminal activity. However, to be sure you put the right system in place to protect your hardware assets, your people, and the business itself, here are three key considerations that make for a successful deployment. 2) Fail to prepare, and then prepare to fail Planning is the key to success, and surveillance systems are no different. Decide in advance the scope of your desired solution. Each site is different and the reality is that every solution is different too. There is no ‘one-size-fits-all solution and only by investing time on the exact specification can you arrive at the most robust and optimal solution.  For example, organisations need to consider all the deployment variables within the system’s environment. What is the balance between indoor and outdoor settings; how exposed to the elements are the outdoor cameras; what IP rating to the need? A discussion with a security installer will help identify the dangerous areas that need to be covered and the associated best sites for camera locations. Camera coverage After determining location and coverage angles, indoors and outdoors, the next step is to make sure the cameras specified are up to the job for each location. Do they have the right lens for the distance they are required to cover, for example? It is not as simple as specifying one type of camera and deploying it everywhere. Devices that can use multiple power sources, Direct Current, or Power over Ethernet well are far more versatile You have to consider technical aspects such as the required level of visual fidelity and whether you also need two-way audio at certain locations? Another simple consideration is how the devices are powered. Devices that can use multiple power sources, Direct Current or Power over Ethernet as well are far more versatile and reliable. Answers to these questions and a lot more need to be uncovered by an expert, to deliver a best-of-breed solution for the particular site. 3) Flexibility breeds resilience Understanding exactly what you need is the start. Ensuring you can install, operate and manage your video surveillance system is the next step. Solutions that are simple to install and easy to maintain will always be favoured - for example, cameras that have multiple sources of power can be vital for year-round reliability. Alongside the physical aspect of any installation, there is also the software element that needs to be considered. The last thing organisations need is a compatibility headache once all their cameras and monitoring stations are in place. Selecting cameras and equipment with the flexibility to support a variety of different operating systems and software is important not just for the days following the installation, but also to future-proof the solution against change.  Easy does it Once the system is up and running, the real work of video surveillance begins. Therefore, any organisation considering deploying a system should look to pick one that makes the day-to-day operation as easy as possible to manage. And again - that is all about the set-up. Cameras can also provide alerts if they have been tampered with or their settings changed The most modern systems and technology can deliver surveillance systems that offer smarter detection, enhanced activity reporting so you learn more about your operations, and also make off-site, remote management easy to both implement and adjust as conditions change. For example, camera software that immediately notifies controllers when certain parameters are met - like motion detection that monitors a specific area for unauthorised access. Cameras can also provide alerts if they have been tampered with or their settings changed without proper authorisation. Remote management of HD footage What’s more, the days of poor quality or unreliable transfer of video are long gone. The high-quality HD footage can be captured, stored, and transferred across networks without any degradation, with hard drives or cloud-based systems able to keep hundreds of days of high-quality recordings for analysis of historical data. Finally, the best surveillance solutions also allow for secure remote management not just from a central control room, but also from personal devices and mobile apps. All this delivers ‘always-on’ security and peace of mind. The watchword in security Modern video surveillance takes organisational security to the next level. It protects physical assets, ensures workplace and workforce safety, and helps protect the operations, reputation, and profitability of a business.  However, this is not just an ‘off-the-shelf purchase’. It requires proper planning in the form of site surveys, equipment and software specifications, as well as an understanding of operational demands and requirements. Investing time in planning will help businesses realise the best dividends in terms of protection. Ultimately, that means organisations should seek to collaborate with vendors who offer site surveys - they know their equipment best, your needs, and can work with you to create the perfect solution.

Get the most from investments in building security
Get the most from investments in building security

From analogue to digital, from stand-alone to interlinked, building systems are in a state of transition. Moreover, the rate of change shows no sign of slowing, which can make it difficult to keep up to date with all the latest developments. If asked to pinpoint the single biggest driver of this revolution, one could point out the growing clamour for platform convergence. A security guard in a building doesn’t want to use different systems to check video cameras, fire alarms or if someone has entered a restricted area: – it simply isn’t efficient. For similar reasons, a building manager wants a single interface to control heating and lighting to match fluctuating occupancy levels, particularly in a hybrid working model. Applying the digital glue The demand from end-users for system convergence is growing, but to achieve full interoperability you still need to apply some ‘digital glue’ and that requires expertise. Yet bringing together disparate systems from different manufacturers can be problematic. Just as you get things to work, someone upgrades their solution and your carefully implemented convergence can start to come unstuck. Managing an implementation can quickly become more complicated, today’s quick-fix can become tomorrow’s headache This is one of the principal issues with all types of new technology; not everyone will choose the same path to reach the desired goal – it’s the old VHS/Betamax argument updated for building management and security systems. Managing and maintaining an implementation can quickly become more complicated than it first appears and without proper oversight, today’s quick-fix can become tomorrow’s technical headache. Effective support for a hybrid workforce Today’s hybrid workforce is a response to the pandemic that looks set to become an established part of working life for many companies across the world. Security systems have a massive role to play in facilitating this transformation that goes beyond simple intrusion detection, access control, and video monitoring. They can identify the most densely populated areas in a building to comply with social distancing guidelines and provide efficient use of space. The insights gathered from a security system can also be used to identify patterns of behaviour, which can then be used for planning and directing the use of building space to help create the best possible working environment while also minimising heating, lighting, and air conditioning expenditures. Identity credentials can help manage compliance with industry regulations by limiting access to certain areas Similarly, identity credentials – either biometric or mobile-based – can help manage compliance to industry regulations by limiting access to certain areas only to approved employees. Creating and maintaining the appropriate level of functionality requires a combination of innovative solutions and industry experience. The complete security package It’s not just physical security that’s important – cybersecurity is a major focus, too. Bringing together both the physical security and cybersecurity realms is increasingly becoming a ‘must have’ capability. What is evident is that the pace of technological change is faster than ever. Today’s functionality simply wouldn’t have been possible just a few years ago, while today’s leading-edge developments may seem commonplace in five years.

Convenience and cost savings make cloud managed video surveillance a popular choice for many businesses
Convenience and cost savings make cloud managed video surveillance a popular choice for many businesses

Cloud-based technology can reduce IT costs, streamline application management and make infrastructure more flexible and scalable. So, it’s no surprise that cloud video surveillance solutions (also known as video surveillance as a service or VSaaS) are gaining momentum in a big way. In fact, according to recent reports, the VSaaS market is forecasted to increase at a compound annual growth rate of 10.4% by 2025. But some company owners may wonder – what services does a cloud model deliver and is such a solution right for my business? This article aims to help you determine what cloud video surveillance solution is right for your business and the benefits you can enjoy if you decide to deploy a VSaaS solution. Full cloud-based recording vs cloud-managed First, a bit of clarification on cloud video surveillance models, as definitions can vary from provider to provider. A full cloud-based recording solution is one in which both video recording and management are done offsite (for example, cameras streaming directly to the cloud). While this model can be a good option for some, many large enterprise businesses simply don’t have the bandwidth capacity or network resources required to upload all of their videos to the cloud. Even with the bandwidth capacity, this can be a cost-prohibitive model when hundreds or thousands of IP cameras are involved. A full cloud-based recording solution is one in which both video recording and management are done offsite But that doesn’t mean enterprise businesses can’t take advantage of cloud-managed video surveillance. With this solution, video recording and storage happen on your premises (with network video recorders (NVRs) or a video management system (VMS)), but the video management aspect is handled in the cloud by a third-party provider, usually as a subscription-based service. The provider hosts the central video server overseeing your on-premises devices. Some providers also allow you to back up portions of the video to the cloud, so you can store and share video evidence or select clips needed for investigations. This model combines the performance benefits of local recording with the convenience and cost savings of the cloud. Centralised video surveillance solution Perhaps the greatest benefit of using this type of cloud-managed video surveillance solution is centralisation. Because all of your devices are centrally managed in the cloud, you don’t have to travel to a distant location to update a recorder or camera’s software – it’s all done remotely by the provider from a central location. This can save you both time and money, especially since it’s necessary to consistently monitor the configuration settings on cameras and NVRs to ensure they’re correct and functioning properly. If your hardware malfunctions and it isn’t detected immediately, instances of lost video can occur. And business owners know that losing video evidence of theft or fraud could have significant consequences to the efficiency and effectiveness of an investigation. Round the clock monitoring Some providers monitor for changes in cameras’ field of view, so if a camera is blocked or moved, you’ll be alerted  With a cloud-managed model, you can rest assured that if a camera goes down or another technical issue arises, the provider will know and will handle it immediately so you can avoid unnecessary truck rolls, which can be costly. Some providers will even monitor for changes in your cameras’ field of view, so if a camera is blocked or moved, you’ll be alerted right away. This type of around-the-clock monitoring eliminates your need for an in-house data centre and the IT staff necessary to maintain the video system. This is particularly important if you don’t have the infrastructure or the personnel to host your own video networking equipment. You can also save time with the deployment of your video surveillance solution since your provider will get your system up and running quickly. There’s no need to worry about setting up or configuring the central server or any application software – it’s all taken care of by your provider. Flexible and cost-effective In many cloud-managed solutions, you can also skip the large upfront capital cost of a video surveillance investment and pay a monthly fee for all of these services. This is particularly helpful if it’s difficult for your organisation to make large capital investments. You may or may not have to invest in onsite devices (cameras and NVRs), depending on the provider you choose. Some providers will allow you to finance your hardware, while others will want you to purchase it upfront. Many cloud providers also offer robust web clients for viewing video and conducting investigations remotely Many cloud providers also offer robust web clients for viewing video and conducting investigations remotely. These do not require any local downloads, which saves you time and money by avoiding the need for additional IT resources. It also alleviates worrying about whether or not you have the latest version, as the clients are automatically updated. And if you don’t want to spend a lot of time on video analysis, some cloud-managed models offer predefined reports on what’s most important to you. For example, a list of potentially suspicious transactions matched with video – so you can quickly scan to investigate. Getting the right solution Determining whether a cloud-managed video surveillance solution is right for your business is a big decision involving many factors, including your business’s size, bandwidth, and network infrastructure, and overall budget for physical security. By considering the points above, the hope is that you can more easily determine which model is best for your business.

Latest Bosch Security Systems news

Sensor data fusion for more reliable intrusion alarm systems
Sensor data fusion for more reliable intrusion alarm systems

Intrusion alarm systems are currently facing a growing number of potential error sources in the environment. At the same time, alarm systems must comply with increasingly demanding legal requirements for sensors and motion detectors. As a future-proof solution, detectors equipped with Sensor Data Fusion technology raise the level of security while reducing the risk of cost- and time-intensive false alarms. This article provides a comprehensive overview of Sensor Data Fusion technology. Anti-masking alarms A cultural heritage museum in the South of Germany for decades, the installed intrusion alarm system has provided reliable protection on the premises. But suddenly, the detectors trigger false alarms every night after the museum closes. The system integrators are puzzled and conduct extensive tests of the entire system. When they finally identify the culprit, it’s unexpected: As it turns out, the recently installed LED lighting system in the museum’s exhibition spaces radiates at a wavelength that triggers anti-masking alarms in the detectors. Not an easy fix situation, since a new lighting system would prove far too costly. Ultimately, the integrators need to perform extensive detector firmware updates and switch to different sensor architecture to eliminate the error source.  This scenario is by no means an isolated incident, but part of a growing trend. Need for reliable detector technology Legal requirements for anti-masking technology are becoming stringent in response to tactics by criminals The number of potential triggers for erroneous alarms in the environment is on the rise. From the perspective of system operators and integrators, it’s a concerning development because every false alarm lowers the credibility of an intrusion alarm system. Not to mention steep costs: Every false call to the authorities comes with a price +$200 tag.   Aside from error sources in the environment, legal requirements for anti-masking technology are becoming more stringent in response to ever more resourceful tactics employed by criminals to sidestep detectors. What’s more, today’s detectors need to be fortified against service outages and provide reliable, around-the-clock operability to catch intruders in a timely and reliable fashion. Sensor Data Fusion Technology In light of these demands, one particular approach has emerged as a future-proof solution over the past few years: Sensor Data Fusion technology, the combination of several types of sensors within one detector – designed to cross-check and verify alarm sources via intelligent algorithms – holds the keys to minimising false alarms and responding appropriately to actual alarm events. This generation of detectors combines passive infrared (PIR) and microwave Doppler radar capabilities with artificial intelligence (AI) to eliminate false alarm sources without sacrificing catch performance. Motion detectors equipped with Sensor Data Fusion technology present a fail-proof solution for building security “It’s not about packing as many sensors as possible into a detector. But it’s about including the most relevant sensors with checks and balances through an intelligent algorithm that verifies the data for a highly reliable level of security. The result is the highest-possible catch performance at the minimum risk for erroneous alarms,” said Michael Reimer, Senior Product Manager at Bosch Security Systems. Motion detectors with sensor data fusion Looking ahead into the future, motion detectors equipped with Sensor Data Fusion technology not only present a fail-proof solution for building security. The comprehensive data collected by these sensors also unlock value beyond security: Constant real-time information on temperature and humidity can be used by intelligent systems and devices in building automation. Integrated into building management systems, the sensors provide efficiency improvements and lowering energy costs Integrated into building management systems, the sensors provide the foundation for efficiency improvements and lowering energy costs in HVAC systems. Companies such as Bosch support these network synergies by constantly developing and optimising intelligent sensors. On that note, installers must be familiar with the latest generation of sensor technology to upgrade their systems accordingly, starting with a comprehensive overview of error sources in the environment. Prominent false alarm triggers in intrusion alarm systems The following factors emerge as frequent triggers of false alarms in conventional detectors: Strong temperature fluctuations can be interpreted by sensors as indicators of a person inside the building. Triggers range from floor heating sources to strong sunlight. In this context, room temperatures above 86°F (30°C) have proven particularly problematic. Dust contamination of optical detectors lowers the detection performance while raising susceptibility to false alarms. Draft air from air conditioning systems or open windows can trigger motion sensors, especially when curtains, plants, or signage attached to the ceilings (e.g. in grocery stores) are put in motion. Strong light exposure directly on the sensor surface, e.g. caused by headlights from passing vehicles, floodlights, reflected or direct sunlight – all of which sensors may interpret as a flashlight from an intruder. Extensive bandwidth frequencies in Wi-Fi routers can potentially confuse sensors. Only a few years ago, wireless routers operated on a bandwidth of around 2.7GHz while today’s devices often exceed 5GHz, thereby catching older detectors off guard. LED lights radiating at frequencies beyond the spectrum of visible light may trigger sensors with their infrared signals. Regarding the last two points, it’s important to note that legislation provides clear guidelines for the maximum frequency spectrum maintained by Wi-Fi routers and LED lighting. Long-term security But the influx of cheap and illegal products in both product groups – products that do not meet the guidelines – continues to pose problems when installed near conventional detectors. For this reason, Sensor Data Fusion technology provides a reliable solution by verifying alarms with data from several types of sensors within a single detector. Beyond providing immunity from false alarm triggers, the new generation of sensors also needs to comply with the current legislature. These guidelines include the latest EN50131-grade 3, and German VdS class C standards with clear requirements regarding anti-masking technology for detecting sabotage attempts. This is exactly where Sensor Data Fusion technology provides long-term security. Evolution of intrusion detector technology Initially, motion detectors designed for intrusion alarm systems were merely equipped with a single type of sensor; namely passive infrared technology (PIR). Upon their introduction, these sensors raised the overall level of building security tremendously in automated security systems. But over time, these sensors proved limited in their catch performance. As a result, manufacturers began implementing microwave Doppler radar capabilities to cover additional sources of intrusion alarms. First step detection technology In Bosch sensors, engineers added First Step detection to trigger instant alarms upon persons entering a room Over the next few years, sensors were also equipped with sensors detecting visible light to catch flashlights used by burglars, as well as temperature sensors. In Bosch sensors, engineers added proprietary technologies such as First Step detection to trigger instant alarms upon persons entering a room. But experience in the field soon proved, especially due to error sources such as rats and other animals, that comprehensive intrusion detection demands a synergetic approach: A combination of sensors aligned to cross-check one another for a proactive response to incoming signals. At the same time, the aforementioned bandwidth expansion in Wi-Fi routers and LED lighting systems required detectors to implement the latest circuit technology to avoid serving as ‘antennas’ for undesired signals. Sensor data fusion approach At its very core, Sensor Data Fusion technology relies on the centralised collection of all data captured by the variety of different sensors included in a single detector. These data streams are directed to a microprocessor capable of analysing the signals in real-time via a complex algorithm. This algorithm is the key to Sensor Data Fusion. It enables the detector to balance active sensors and adjust sensitivities as needed, to make truly intelligent decisions regarding whether or not the data indicates a valid alarm condition – and if so, trigger an alarm. Advanced verification mechanisms The current generation of Sensor Data Fusion detectors, for instance from Bosch, feature advanced verification mechanisms, including Microwave Noise Adaptive Processing to easily differentiate humans from false alarm sources (e.g. ceiling fans or hanging signs). For increased reliability, signals from PIR and microwave Doppler radar are compared to determine whether an actual alarm event is taking place. Additionally, the optical chamber is sealed to prevent drafts and insects from affecting the detector, while the detector is programmed for pet and small animal immunity. Sensor cross-verification Further types of sensors embedded in current and future generations of Sensor Data Fusion detectors include MEM-sensors as well as vibration sensors and accelerometers. Ultimately, it’s important to keep in mind that the cross-verification between sensors serves to increase false alarm immunity without sacrificing the catch performance of actual intruders. It merely serves to cover various indicators of intrusion. Protecting UNESCO World Cultural Heritage in China Intelligent detectors equipped with Sensor Data Fusion are protecting historic cultural artifacts in China from theft and damage. At the UNESCO-protected Terracotta Warriors Museum site, one hundred TriTech motion detectors from Bosch with PIR and microwave Doppler radar technology safeguard the invaluable treasures against intruders. To provide comprehensive protection amid the specific demands of the museum site, the detectors have been installed on walls and ceilings to safeguard the 16,300-square-meter museum site. To ensure an optimal visitor experience without interference from glass walls and other barriers, many detectors are mounted at a height of 4.5 meters (15 feet) above ground under the ceiling. Despite their height, the detectors provide accurate data around the clock while exceeding the performance limits of conventional motion detectors, which clock out at a mere 2 meters (6 feet) catchment area. Integrated video systems The site also presents additional error sources such as large amounts of dust that can contaminate the sensors, as well as visitors accidentally dropping their cameras or mobile phones next to museum exhibits. To distinguish these events from actual criminal activity, the intrusion alarm system is integrated with the museum’s video security system. This allows for verifying alarm triggers with real-time video footage at a fast pace: In the case of an actual alarm event, the system alerts the on-site security personnel in the control room in less than two seconds. Added value beyond security Sensor Data Fusion technology provides a viable solution for the rising number of error sources in the environment As of today, Sensor Data Fusion technology already provides a viable solution for the rising number of error sources in the environment while providing legally compliant building security against intruders. In light of future developments, operators can leverage significant added value from upgrading existing systems – possibly without fundamentally replacing current system architecture – to the new detector standard. Added value how? On one hand, the detectors can integrate with access control, video security, voice alarm, and analytics for a heightened level of security. These synergetic effects are especially pronounced on end-to-end platforms like the Bosch Building Management system. On the other hand, the data streams from intelligent detectors also supply actionable intelligence to building automation systems, for instance as the basis for efficiency improvements and lowering energy consumption in HVAC systems. New backward-compatible detectors Bosch will release a new series of commercial detectors by end of 2021, based on the latest research on risk factors for false alarm sources in the environment and line with current legislation and safety standards. Throughout these developments, installers can rest assured that all new detectors are fully backward compatible and work with existing networking/architecture. With that said, Sensor Data Fusion technology emerges as the key to more secure intrusion alarm systems today and in the future. TriTech detectors from Bosch For reliable, fail-proof alarms the current series of TriTech detectors from Bosch relies on a combination of different sensor data streams, evaluated by an integrated algorithm. These Sensor Data Fusion detectors from Bosch combine up to five different sensors in a single unit, including: Long-range passive infrared (PIR) sensor Short-range PIR sensor Microwave sensor White light sensor Temperature sensor Equipped with these sensors, TriTech detectors are capable of detecting the most frequent sources of false alarms; from headlights on passing cars to a mouse passing across the room at a 4.5-meter distance to the detector. What’s more, TriTech detectors provide reliable performance at room temperatures above 86°F (30°C) while fully guarding against actual intrusion and sabotage attempts from criminals.

LENSEC integrates PVMS with Bosch’s intrusion panel
LENSEC integrates PVMS with Bosch’s intrusion panel

LENSEC is proud to announce the integration of their Perspective Video Management Software (PVMS)® with Bosch’s Intrusion Control Panels (B and G Series). This new partnership allows security operators to manage intrusion, fire, and access control systems while monitoring video surveillance cameras from behind one pane of glass. Through the integration, operators can view events issued by the panel, such as gas, fire, and burglar alarms, and send commands to the connected device. Supported commands include the arming and disarming of devices, activating and silencing bells, bypassing points, and more. This integration places alarm monitoring, device control, and event reaction into one intuitive interface, eliminating the need for multiple monitoring points. Bosch Intrusion Panel Most importantly, all applicable events and actions are available from a unified security platform provided by the Perspective Video Management Software. The ability to bring control of disparate systems into a single, browser-based application delivers critical time-saving advantages. By leveraging the capabilities of the Bosch Intrusion Panel and the existing monitoring, reporting, and analytic features provided by PVMS, security operators can manage multiple life-safety programs from one visual interface. “We are excited about the integration between PVMS and Bosch’s intrusion panels because it will no doubt make things easier for security operators,” said Michael Trask, Director of North American Sales for LENSEC. “What was once managed from three or four different platforms is now available under one system. This integration aligns with both LENSEC’s and Bosch’s goal of providing easy-to-use solutions for our clients.”

Global MSC Security announces that Peter Goodman will share how home office ACE initiative addresses public safety
Global MSC Security announces that Peter Goodman will share how home office ACE initiative addresses public safety

Global MSC Security announces that former Chief Constable of Derbyshire Constabulary and now a Strategic Advisor to the Home Office’s Accelerated Capability Environment (ACE) initiative, Peter Goodman OBE QPM, will participate in the Global MSC Security Conference and Exhibition 2021. The event takes place in Bristol on Tuesday 19th October and this year focuses on the use of artificial intelligence in the surveillance industry. During his 33 years’ service working across three police forces, Peter Goodman OBE QPM was also the National Police Chiefs’ Council lead for cybercrime, as well as leadership roles focused on counter-terrorism, forensics, and tackling serious and organised crime nationally. Right business processes At the Global MSC Security Conference and Exhibition 2021, he will share insights into his work at ACE - a Home Office initiative within the Homeland Security Group that solves public safety and security challenges, arising from rapidly changing digital and data technologies. Peter Goodman OBE QPM states: “With over 300 commissions under our belt, ACE has demonstrated that the public sector can be at the cutting edge of innovation and match the pace of the best innovators with the right business processes and the very best partners.” ACE has demonstrated that the public sector can be at the cutting edge of innovation" He joins a high calibre programme of speakers that includes Fraser Sampson, the Commissioner for the Retention and Use of Biometric Material and Surveillance Camera Commissioner; Philip Ingram MBE of Grey Hare Media; Professor Martin Innes, Director, Crime and Security Research Institute at Cardiff University and Director of the Universities' Police Science Institute; Louise Stapleton, Counter Terrorism Security Advisor at Avon & Somerset Police, and Professor James Ferryman from the University of Reading. Solving security challenges Derek Maltby, MD of Global MSC Security states: “The Global MSC Security Conference and Exhibition stands alone in its ability to bring together national and local government, policing, academia and the private sector to address and advance the challenges and opportunities facing the surveillance industry, of which artificial intelligence presents both. I am looking forward to learning about Peter’s perspective through his work with ACE.” The Global MSC Security Conference and Exhibition takes place on Tuesday 19th October 2021 at The Bristol Hotel in Bristol City Centre, from 9 am until 3.30 pm. The event is sponsored by Genetec, Synectics, Bosch, 360 Vision, Milestone, and DSSL Group. The chosen charity for this year is Meningitis Now.

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