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Vaion Ltd. has announced the release of its latest product line, Vaion vcam camera with integrated directional audio analytics and exceptional image quality.

Lars Eirik Mobæk, Vaion’s Head of Hardware Engineering said, “With great excitement, I am proud to announce the general availability of Vaion vcam, our camera line with integrated directional audio analytics. vcam embodies our ambition to deliver exceptional image quality with unprecedented audio and video intelligence for a wide range of security scenarios.

Vaion vcam

A recent IHS Markit white paper reported that 770 million cameras were operating globally at the end of 2019. The US alone amounted to 70 million installed surveillance cameras, not to mention the colossal amount of video they record.

However, the important questions regarding the cameras were:

  • How many of these cameras use outdated technology?
  • How much of the data recorded is relevant for real-time assessment and action?
  • How many can do more than just see?

Disrupting the security industry with an intelligent, versatile, and seamless to install and manage camera was one of the reasons why Vaion was founded. The company saw great potential in delivering a simple portfolio of best-in-class devices with modern features that are fit for the current and future needs of global organisations.

8MP Dome and 12MP Pano vcam

8 MP Dome delivers outstanding video clarity and 12 MP Pano secures locations that require 360° coverage

Vaion vcam comes in two form-factors suitable for any deployment, from commercial and industrial facilities, schools, to retail stores or hospitals and their surrounding areas. The 8 MP Dome delivers outstanding video clarity, while the 12 MP Pano additionally secures locations that require 360° coverage.

Engineered in Norway and manufactured in Taiwan, both models are vandal-resistant (IK10) and perform exceptionally well even in the harshest weather conditions (IP66). With built-in IR LED illumination and multi-exposure line-based HDR, vcam delivers high-quality video in scenes with both bright and dark areas and with fast-moving objects.

Clear audio and privacy protection

Vaion vcam not only detects unusual sound patterns, but it also alerts operators of their origin. Its built-in acoustic sensor identifies loud noises, broken glass, shouting or verbal aggression, and gunshots even when the camera points in a different direction. They lower the incidence of false-positives by programming the sensor to ignore ambient noise or conversations.

Useful in cases of burglaries in retail stores or physical aggression in schools or prisons, the camera’s audio analytics help operators react to incidents before they escalate. Vaion lays emphasis on privacy protection, which is why the camera doesn't record any audio and only listens to sounds to raise alarms. For scenarios where the audio alarm is necessary, users can configure vcam to store the audio corresponding to the alarm.

Integrated with computer vision technology

Worried about the storage costs for video footage while preserving all the forensic details that might be needed to solve cases?

Vaion vcam uses computer vision technology to identify and record in full resolution only interesting activity and details (motion, people, vehicles, etc.). At the same time, irrelevant background areas in the same frame are recorded in a lower resolution, thereby saving storage space and money.

Enhanced Cyber Security

In the connected world that exists, security cameras are vulnerable to cyber-attacks

In the connected world that exists, security cameras are vulnerable to cyber-attacks. Password reset flaws, compliance issues, outdated firmware, or unencrypted communications are some of the current issues that hackers can easily exploit.

Vaion is committed to build products that are secure by design, which is also the essence of vcam that can never be a business liability. Vaion vcam features integrated Ambarella CV22 chipset-powered secure boot to prevent hackers from taking control of the device. It also uses end-to-end encryption to prevent eavesdropping on feeds.

Supports Vaion vcore VMS

Furthermore, to protect the video library, users can set detailed user access privileges easily. To further enhance protection, Vaion vcam features extra layers of security, such as factory-installed certificates on a trusted platform module, only support for encrypted protocols, and strong authentication to limit access to authorised personnel only.

When paired with the Vaion vcore Video Management System (Vaion vcore VMS), vcam identifies people, objects, events, anomalies, and similarities to keep people, assets, and data protected in real-time. And, it only takes a couple of clicks to get software upgrades from Vaion vcore to keep the cameras updated with the latest features.

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