The organisers of UK Security Week, the UK’s leading national security event, have announced a raft of high profile, international speakers that will deliver thought-provoking presentations at this year’s World Counter Terror Congress (WCTC) and Ambition conference.

Evolving terrorist threat

From 6-7 March, government officials, the emergency services and security professionals from around the world will attend the events – which will run concurrently during UK Security Week in London – to discuss the evolving terrorist threat and how emergency services can prepare for future atrocities.

Both the WCTC and Ambition will feature a number of exclusive, high profile international speakers, meaning that delegates will only get the chance to hear their invaluable views during UK Security Week in March next year.

International strategy

For the first time, the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) will participate in the WCTC

The internationally-renowned World Counter Terror Congress (WCTC) draws on global expertise from counter terror leaders around the world. This year’s programme will feature speakers from the most nations in the event’s history, with counter terror leaders of the UK, United States, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Belgium, Norway, the Netherlands, EU and NATO all confirmed to speak.

For the first time, the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) will participate in the WCTC. Grant Mendenhall, assistant director of the Counterterrorism Division of the organisation, will give a unique insight into how the organisation detects, deters and disrupts terror threats to the United States.

Conference speakers

Reflecting its standing as a truly international conference, security professionals will also be able to hear from Rob Wainwright, Director of Europol; Dr. Gerhard Conrad, Director of the EU Intelligence and Situation Centre; Chief Commissioner Michel Goovaerts, Chief of the Brussels Police; First Commissioner Jean-Pierre Devos, Intelligence and Analysis for the Federal Police Belgium; Superintendent Magnus Sjöberg, Head of Counterterrorism Process at the Swedish Police’s National Counterterrorism Council (NTR); and Gunnar Carlsson, President and Co-founder of Ayasdi – a US-based artificial intelligence software business.

Assistant Chief Constable Terri Nicholson, Deputy Senior National Coordinator, Counter Terrorism Policing National Operations Centre for the Met Police will be complemented by numerous other UK-based speakers, including Claudia Sturt, Director of Security, Order and Counterterrorism for HM Prison and Probation Service, and Detective Chief Superintendent Scott Wilson, National Co-ordinator Protect & Prepare, National Counter Terrorism Policing HQ.

The WCTC and Ambition conference will be complemented by numerous other conference sessions during UK Security Week

Emergency preparedness, resilience and response

In addition to WCTC, Ambition – the UK’s leading event for the emergency preparedness, resilience and response (EPRR) community – has announced its strongest ever line-up of global experts to discuss strategies on mitigating the impact of a terrorist attack. Dr François Braun, National Head of the Urgent Medical Aid Service (SAMU), France, will discuss the approaches adopted and lessons learned from SAMU’s medical response to multisite terrorist attacks in Paris.

Dr Robert MacFarlane, assistant director of Resilience Doctrine, Training and Standards, Civil Contingencies Secretariat for the UK Cabinet Office will also speak, along with Colonel Laurent Phelip, Commander of the Gendarmerie National Intervention Group (GIGN) for the French Gendarmerie, and Dr. Fredrik Bynander, Research Director for Centre for Crisis Management Research and Training in Sweden.

Conference sessions

The WCTC and Ambition conference will be complemented by numerous other conference sessions during UK Security Week, including sessions covering critical national infrastructure, cyber, special ops, keeping major events and borders secure, and how to integrate security at the design stage of major projects. Covering every aspect of the industry, it will be the most comprehensive security event, with the most diverse range of speakers, ever held in the country.

Richard Walton, UK Security Week Special Advisor and former Head of Counter Terrorism Command (SO15) at New Scotland Yard, commented: “UK Security Week’s conference programme will address critical issues in our preparedness and ability to prevent and protect nations, businesses and the public from future attacks. The speakers lined-up for next year’s events are leaders in their fields and no other event can match the expertise they will bring together. It is an invaluable experience for everyone working in the security industry and is not to be missed.”

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