Secutech Thailand is set to open to the trade from 16 – 18 November in Bangkok. To align with the local market demand and trends, the 2017 edition will reveal a complete blueprint of a smart and safe city to an estimated 15,000 trade visitors. More than 150 global brands and companies will feature various updated applications in smart factory, high-rise buildings, hotels, home and retail. These applications will be fully integrated with the latest technologies such as intelligent video, efficient storage solution, access control, IoT Cloud, high-speed and wireless transmission.

Occupying 7,000 sqm of the Bangkok International Trade & Exhibition Centre (BITEC), the show has increased by 133% in size compared to the last edition. Ms Regina Tsai, Deputy General Manager of Messe Frankfurt New Era Business Media shared her view of the expansion: “Thanks to the joint efforts with our partner Worldex G.E.C. Co. Ltd, local authorities and industry counterparts, we have injected many new elements in the show with a focus on smart and safe city, a growing and lucrative sector in the ASEAN market. Judging from the positive industry response, we know we are moving forward on the right track and we are delighted to see the tremendous growth of Secutech Thailand this year.”

Advanced solution displays

Over 150 key industry brands including Bluguard, Brinno, Chawla Fire Protection, CP PLUS, Dahua Technology, Global Fire Solution, Great Empire, Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology, Hanwha Techwin, HIP Global, Indigo Distribution, Maxwell Security System, NetPosa, Technologies, Radwin, Seagate Technology, Somfy Thailand, Tyco Security and WizMart. They will display their advanced solutions in six well identified zones, including Smart City, Smart Home, Smart Retail, Z-Wave Pavilion, UL Pavilion and Intelligent Video Gallery.

The showcase will feature solutions for smart home security, ambient living, energy saving and automation for homes

Continuing the success of SMAhome in Secutech Taipei, it will also take part in the Thailand show for the first time. The showcase will feature solutions for smart home security, ambient living, energy saving and automation for homes. To connect the exhibitors with the fast developing ASEAN market, the organiser has formed seven buyer delegations from Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore and Vietnam. Key buyers from this region will visit the show to look for suitable products to cope with their nation’s urban development.

Intensive fringe programme

An intensive fringe programme with 12 conferences and seminars will be held alongside the fair to deliver new ideas and updates in all corners of a smart and safe city. These include:

  • Thailand Smart City Master Plan Conference
    Supported by: Thailand’s Digital Economy Promotion Agency (DEPA)
    The conference will introduce the roadmap of developing smart cities in Thailand with key technology applications and successful case studies.
  • New Reality of Fire & Safety in Expanding Metropolitans
    Supported by: Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA)
    Experts from the BMA will lecture prevention tips of fire incidents, the requirement of intelligent fire & safety technologies and case studies from fire incidents.
  • Vision for the Development of Smart Industrial Estate in the EEC
    Supported by: Industrial Estate Authority of Thailand (IEAT)
    The seminar will focus on the development; energy saving and management and deploying Industry 4.0 into smart parks in The Eastern Economic Corridor (EEC).
  • The Challenge of Security & Safety in Public Building
    Supported by: Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA)
    Representatives from BMA will explain the policies on public safety, and the requirement of intelligent security technologies in high-rise buildings and case studies.
  • Industry 4.0: Making Factories Smarter and Safer
    Supported by: Industrial Estate Authority of Thailand (IEAT)
    Hot topics related to the evaluation of industry 4.0; intelligent security technologies to facilitate industry 4.0; solutions for industrial IoT development, and smart & safe factories will be discussed.
  • Hotel Security Association of Thailand Annual Conference
    Supported by: Hotel Security Association Thailand
    A conference dedicated to smart hotel management, and intelligent security & smart home solutions to facilitate smart hotels.

Leading platform for smart city market

Secutech Thailand 2017 will be held concurrently with the industry related events Thailand Lighting Fair and Thailand Building Fair, with the aim to draw a larger pool of relevant trade buyers from various sectors. More than 15,000 buyers are expected to attend the events.

The show is also strongly supported by various government authorities including Department Disaster Prevention and Mitigation (DDPM), Thailand Green Building Institute (TGBI), Asian Professional Security Association (APSA), Thailand Security Association (TSA), Thai Retailer Association, Housing Business Association (HBA), Thai Condominium Association, Thai Real Estate Association, National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA) and Thailand Electrical & Mechanical Contractors Association (TEMCA). Their support builds a solid foundation for the fair to be a leading platform for smart city market.

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