Pulse Secure, the provider of software-defined Secure Access solutions, announces its Access Suite and SDP solution were recognised in a recently published analyst report, ‘Market Insights: Software Defined Perimeter (SDP)’ for Zero Trust Network Security, 2020.

The Software Defined Perimeter market insights report, by Quadrant Knowledge Solutions, presents market definitions, drivers, primary use cases, trends, solution characteristics and architectures, as well as market recommendations and vendor profiles.

Advanced network security solution

According to the report, “Software Defined Perimeter technology is emerging as an advanced network security solution for today's complex, interconnected world. SDP follows a Zero Trust approach, wherein the default network security posture is that of deny. Access is granted upon authenticating and authorising both user and device.”

Advanced SSL-VPNs operate at the application layer and offer Zero Trust functionality"

By pre-authorising users and devices prior to making the application layer access (applications and resources), SDP protects enterprises from a range of attacks. The debate of SDP as a complete replacement over VPN (SSL-VPN), that SSL-VPN is insecure, or SSL-VPN lacking Zero Trust capabilities, is all moot. SSL-VPN is a proven, widely used tool for secure remote access. Advanced SSL-VPNs operate at the application layer and offer Zero Trust functionality.”

Secure access solution

Pulse Access Suite with SDP has extensive functional capabilities and greater infrastructure, security and application interoperability that supports, comparatively, a broader and more diverse range of use cases,” said Piyush Dewangan, industry research manager at Quadrant Knowledge Solutions. “The company is distinguished among zero trust, secure access solution vendors, especially for enterprises and service providers operating hybrid IT and multi-cloud environments.”

Pulse Secure’s Zero Trust value proposition is realised through its Access Suites that deliver continuous user and device authentication, protected connectivity, extensive visibility and threat response across mobile, network and cloud environments. The integrated Suites offer enterprises easy access for end users and single-pane-of-glass management for administrators. Organisations can centrally orchestrate Zero Trust policy to ensure compliant access to applications, resources and services no matter where they reside; on-premises, in private cloud and public cloud environments.

Improving user productivity

Pulse SDP, is an add-on to the Suite that extends secure access capabilities

Pulse SDP, Software Defined Perimeter, is an add-on to the Suite that extends secure access capabilities by allowing direct, trusted access between a user’s device and the application residing in the cloud or data centre.

The need for Zero Trust network security has never been greater, especially due to increased targeted attacks, rapid work from home mandates, and mounting privacy compliance obligations. We have seen tremendous demand for our Pulse Access Suites as organisations consolidate their secure access tech stack to gain agility, scale and cyber risk mitigation,” said Scott Gordon, chief marketing officer at Pulse Secure. “We are pleased to receive Zero Trust security market distinction and welcome organisations to explore our Access Suite to see how it can cost-effectively improve user productivity and enterprise security posture.”

Granular conditional access and enforcement

Pulse Secure solution’s Zero Trust approach that is highlighted in the SDP market insights report include:

  • Zero Trust mechanisms - continuous authentication, endpoint posture checking, granular conditional access and enforcement, and simultaneous per application tunnelling
  • Continuous authentication and authorisation of users and devices by leveraging extensive multi-factor authentication (MFA), single sign-on (SSO), granular role-based access control, behaviour analytics, and other secure connection options
  • Unified Pulse Client to ensure native user experience and endpoint compliance for popular OS’s, such as Windows, macOS, Linux, Android and iOS
  • Dual-mode architecture within the platform allowing SDP and VPN functionality to work in parallel to provide zero trust secure access, deployment flexibility, and lower TCO
  • Proprietary Optimal Gateway Selector™ technology to connect authenticated and authorised users to their nearest, available gateway to ensure access responsiveness
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COVID-19 worries boost prospects of touchless biometric systems
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