The organisers of the world’s premier event for security, counter terrorism, cyber security and disaster response have announced the schedule for the first ever International Security Week (ISWeek) that will run from 30 November – 3 December 2020.

Incorporating International Security Expo (ISE), International Cyber Expo (ICE) and International Disaster Response Expo (IDR), ISWeek will deliver a wealth of information during a series of exclusive, free-to-watch innovative sessions that elevate the event beyond the typical slide presentation and webcam format seen at most virtual conferences. Filmed in a television studio setting, with high production value, leading experts from around the globe will be interviewed by veteran security and intelligence journalist, Philip Ingram MBE, during high-level interactive panel discussions and fireside chats. ISWeek is CPD certified by The Security Institute, so attendees will receive CPD points for every session watched

In the UK alone, funding for counter-terrorism policing will grow to £906 million for 2020/21, a £90 million year-on-year increase. ISWeek offers viewers a chance to hear from a host of different perspectives on the challenges being faced by nations and businesses, from both the public and private sectors, as well as those affected first-hand by terrorism.

Opened each day by ISE’s Chairman, Admiral the RT. Hon. Lord West of Spithead GCB DSC PC, the week will be split into four key sections that will be available to watch live or on demand via the ISE website. ISWeek is CPD certified by The Security Institute, so attendees will receive CPD points for every session watched.

Day One: Development in international security

While COVID-19 has impacted the public’s ability to move around freely, both internationally and within individual countries, aviation security and tackling transnational organised crime remains a high priority for the security sector. The inaugural day of ISWeek is sponsored by HS Security, a group of pioneering companies specialising in advanced physical security solutions and engineering, developed to protect people and property around the world.

Starting the week with a state of the nation presentation will be Lucy D'Orsi, Deputy Assistant Commissioner of Specialist Operations at CTPUK on the current threats to the UK, such as Islamist terrorism, and the rise of far-right extremists.

Better protection from terrorism

Aimen Dean, former member of al-Qaeda turned MI6 Spy, will discuss how Islamic-based terrorism is developingAttendees will then hear from a panel of those working to protect the public in the UK and abroad, including Paul Crowther, Chief Constable at British Transport Police; Dr. John Coyne, Head of Strategic Policing and Law Enforcement and Head of the North and Australia’s Security, ASPI.

Barry Palmer, Head of Safety and Security at the Tate Gallery; Fay Tennet, Deputy Director of Security Operations, Parliamentary Security Department Houses of Parliament; Shaun Hipgrave, Senior Home Office Official and Figen Murray, whose son Martyn Hett was tragically killed in the 2017 Manchester terror attacks, will speak about the Protect Duty, which aims to provide UK citizens with better protection from terrorism. There will also be an exclusive session with Aimen Dean, former member of al-Qaeda turned MI6 Spy, who will discuss how Islamic-based terrorism is developing, and what the security sector should look out for.

Day Two: Trends affecting cyber security

With the average cost of cybercrime increasing by 32% for businesses in 2019, the ever-evolving threat of cyber hacks and data leaks must be understood by the cyber security industry. Day two covers cyber security in detail and is sponsored by Tripwire, a trusted leader for establishing a strong cybersecurity foundation, protecting the integrity of mission-critical systems spanning physical, virtual, cloud and DevOps environments.

In a not-to-be-missed session, Philip Ingram and Anthony Leather, Co-founder and Director of Westlands Advisory, will discuss the consultancy’s latest cyber research that will launch exclusively during ISWeek, including the latest data on key industry trends, technology and market growth.

Impact of COVID-19

Exploring the human factor in cyber terrorism by Jenny Radcliffe, also known as the People Hacker

Complementing discussion around the report’s findings, Emma Philpot, CEO of IASME Consortium; Graham Ingram, Chief Information Security Officer at Oxford University; Dr Henry Pearson, UK Cyber Security Ambassador at Department for International Trade (DIT) and cryptographic expert Ian Thornton-Trump of Cyjax will discuss current and future trends affecting cyber security, including the impact of COVID-19.

Exploring the human factor in cyber terrorism will be Jenny Radcliffe, also known as the People Hacker, with Tracy Buckingham, Deputy Director of Security and Cyber Security Exports at DIT presenting her bounce back plan for the UK’s security and cyber exports. Those looking to protect themselves or their organisation from cybercrime should attend the training session from Cyber Griffin, founded by the City of London Police.

Day Three: Crime and law enforcements during COVID-19

In an unstable economic climate, there is nothing more important than avoiding disruption to Critical National Infrastructure (CNI).

During ISWeek, a panel of experts from a number of CNI sectors will come together to explain their role in protecting nations’ assets through policy and implementation, as well as discussing the wider cyber perspective including Chris Fitzgerald, Head of Business Resilience & Security, Thames Water; Justin Lowe, a pioneer in Cyber Resilience of Energy, Utilities and Critical Infrastructures; Andrew Sieradzki, Director of Security at Buro Happold; Dan Webb, Director of Intelligence for Mitie; Jonathan Schulten, Vice Chairman of The Security Institute.

Senior Home Office Official, Angela Essel will outline the projects and priorities of the Government, and how the wider security industry can assist to tackle key issues.

People trafficking

How criminals have adapted to the pandemic to continue running international networks and people trafficking

Addressing the challenges for the UK’s intelligence sharing operations as a result of Brexit will be Ian Dyson, Commissioner for the City of London Police. Additionally, Executive Director Claudia Sturt from Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) will examine the internal and external threats to the prisons in her session.

As the nature of crime changes, so does law enforcement. Roy McComb, former Deputy Director of NCA and Julian Platt, Deputy National Co-Ordinator of Protect & Prepare, NCTPHQ will look at how criminals have adapted to the pandemic to continue running international networks and people trafficking.

Day Four: Disaster response and crisis management

Averting a crisis is the highest priority for security professionals, but when disaster occurs it is vital to be prepared.

For the final day, Anne-Marie Trevelyan, MP for Berwick-upon-Tweed, former Minister for International Development, will give the keynote speech, followed by Tracy Daszkiewicz, Deputy Director of Population Health & Wellbeing at Public Health England who will explain how to manage a crisis – based on her real-life experience with the Salisbury poisonings. UK Government building a 3000-bed hospital in 10 days during COVID-19 crisis

Viewers can enjoy a fireside chat about disaster communications between journalist Paul Peachey at The National and the founder of PR agency Conduit Associates, Sheena Thomson. Closing the week will be Jason Towse, Managing Director of Soft Services at Mitie, looking at how the UK Government responded to the COVID-19 crisis, building a 3000-bed hospital in 10 days and opening Nightingale Hospital facilities across the country.

Virtual insights in physical and cyber security

Speaking about the forthcoming ISWeek, Event Director Rachael Shattock said, “ISWeek comes at an important time for many security, counter terror and disaster response professionals. We continue to live in uncertain and unprecedented times, but the threats remain and it is vital nations and businesses continue to evolve their security to protect citizens and employees."

"We are truly delighted to be able to bring the high-quality content and thought leadership, that International Security Expo portfolio visitors have come to expect, to people’s homes from 30 November – 3 December. While we would all prefer to be meeting face-to-face and connecting with colleagues around the world, we are excited for attendees to experience the high-level style of production and studio setting for the panel discussions, where we’ll cover the latest insights and future trends in physical and cyber security.

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