The organisers of the world’s premier event for security, counter terrorism, cyber security and disaster response have announced the schedule for the first ever International Security Week (ISWeek) that will run from 30 November – 3 December 2020.

Incorporating International Security Expo (ISE), International Cyber Expo (ICE) and International Disaster Response Expo (IDR), ISWeek will deliver a wealth of information during a series of exclusive, free-to-watch innovative sessions that elevate the event beyond the typical slide presentation and webcam format seen at most virtual conferences. Filmed in a television studio setting, with high production value, leading experts from around the globe will be interviewed by veteran security and intelligence journalist, Philip Ingram MBE, during high-level interactive panel discussions and fireside chats. ISWeek is CPD certified by The Security Institute, so attendees will receive CPD points for every session watched

In the UK alone, funding for counter-terrorism policing will grow to £906 million for 2020/21, a £90 million year-on-year increase. ISWeek offers viewers a chance to hear from a host of different perspectives on the challenges being faced by nations and businesses, from both the public and private sectors, as well as those affected first-hand by terrorism.

Opened each day by ISE’s Chairman, Admiral the RT. Hon. Lord West of Spithead GCB DSC PC, the week will be split into four key sections that will be available to watch live or on demand via the ISE website. ISWeek is CPD certified by The Security Institute, so attendees will receive CPD points for every session watched.

Day One: Development in international security

While COVID-19 has impacted the public’s ability to move around freely, both internationally and within individual countries, aviation security and tackling transnational organised crime remains a high priority for the security sector. The inaugural day of ISWeek is sponsored by HS Security, a group of pioneering companies specialising in advanced physical security solutions and engineering, developed to protect people and property around the world.

Starting the week with a state of the nation presentation will be Lucy D'Orsi, Deputy Assistant Commissioner of Specialist Operations at CTPUK on the current threats to the UK, such as Islamist terrorism, and the rise of far-right extremists.

Better protection from terrorism

Aimen Dean, former member of al-Qaeda turned MI6 Spy, will discuss how Islamic-based terrorism is developingAttendees will then hear from a panel of those working to protect the public in the UK and abroad, including Paul Crowther, Chief Constable at British Transport Police; Dr. John Coyne, Head of Strategic Policing and Law Enforcement and Head of the North and Australia’s Security, ASPI.

Barry Palmer, Head of Safety and Security at the Tate Gallery; Fay Tennet, Deputy Director of Security Operations, Parliamentary Security Department Houses of Parliament; Shaun Hipgrave, Senior Home Office Official and Figen Murray, whose son Martyn Hett was tragically killed in the 2017 Manchester terror attacks, will speak about the Protect Duty, which aims to provide UK citizens with better protection from terrorism. There will also be an exclusive session with Aimen Dean, former member of al-Qaeda turned MI6 Spy, who will discuss how Islamic-based terrorism is developing, and what the security sector should look out for.

Day Two: Trends affecting cyber security

With the average cost of cybercrime increasing by 32% for businesses in 2019, the ever-evolving threat of cyber hacks and data leaks must be understood by the cyber security industry. Day two covers cyber security in detail and is sponsored by Tripwire, a trusted leader for establishing a strong cybersecurity foundation, protecting the integrity of mission-critical systems spanning physical, virtual, cloud and DevOps environments.

In a not-to-be-missed session, Philip Ingram and Anthony Leather, Co-founder and Director of Westlands Advisory, will discuss the consultancy’s latest cyber research that will launch exclusively during ISWeek, including the latest data on key industry trends, technology and market growth.

Impact of COVID-19

Exploring the human factor in cyber terrorism by Jenny Radcliffe, also known as the People Hacker

Complementing discussion around the report’s findings, Emma Philpot, CEO of IASME Consortium; Graham Ingram, Chief Information Security Officer at Oxford University; Dr Henry Pearson, UK Cyber Security Ambassador at Department for International Trade (DIT) and cryptographic expert Ian Thornton-Trump of Cyjax will discuss current and future trends affecting cyber security, including the impact of COVID-19.

Exploring the human factor in cyber terrorism will be Jenny Radcliffe, also known as the People Hacker, with Tracy Buckingham, Deputy Director of Security and Cyber Security Exports at DIT presenting her bounce back plan for the UK’s security and cyber exports. Those looking to protect themselves or their organisation from cybercrime should attend the training session from Cyber Griffin, founded by the City of London Police.

Day Three: Crime and law enforcements during COVID-19

In an unstable economic climate, there is nothing more important than avoiding disruption to Critical National Infrastructure (CNI).

During ISWeek, a panel of experts from a number of CNI sectors will come together to explain their role in protecting nations’ assets through policy and implementation, as well as discussing the wider cyber perspective including Chris Fitzgerald, Head of Business Resilience & Security, Thames Water; Justin Lowe, a pioneer in Cyber Resilience of Energy, Utilities and Critical Infrastructures; Andrew Sieradzki, Director of Security at Buro Happold; Dan Webb, Director of Intelligence for Mitie; Jonathan Schulten, Vice Chairman of The Security Institute.

Senior Home Office Official, Angela Essel will outline the projects and priorities of the Government, and how the wider security industry can assist to tackle key issues.

People trafficking

How criminals have adapted to the pandemic to continue running international networks and people trafficking

Addressing the challenges for the UK’s intelligence sharing operations as a result of Brexit will be Ian Dyson, Commissioner for the City of London Police. Additionally, Executive Director Claudia Sturt from Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) will examine the internal and external threats to the prisons in her session.

As the nature of crime changes, so does law enforcement. Roy McComb, former Deputy Director of NCA and Julian Platt, Deputy National Co-Ordinator of Protect & Prepare, NCTPHQ will look at how criminals have adapted to the pandemic to continue running international networks and people trafficking.

Day Four: Disaster response and crisis management

Averting a crisis is the highest priority for security professionals, but when disaster occurs it is vital to be prepared.

For the final day, Anne-Marie Trevelyan, MP for Berwick-upon-Tweed, former Minister for International Development, will give the keynote speech, followed by Tracy Daszkiewicz, Deputy Director of Population Health & Wellbeing at Public Health England who will explain how to manage a crisis – based on her real-life experience with the Salisbury poisonings. UK Government building a 3000-bed hospital in 10 days during COVID-19 crisis

Viewers can enjoy a fireside chat about disaster communications between journalist Paul Peachey at The National and the founder of PR agency Conduit Associates, Sheena Thomson. Closing the week will be Jason Towse, Managing Director of Soft Services at Mitie, looking at how the UK Government responded to the COVID-19 crisis, building a 3000-bed hospital in 10 days and opening Nightingale Hospital facilities across the country.

Virtual insights in physical and cyber security

Speaking about the forthcoming ISWeek, Event Director Rachael Shattock said, “ISWeek comes at an important time for many security, counter terror and disaster response professionals. We continue to live in uncertain and unprecedented times, but the threats remain and it is vital nations and businesses continue to evolve their security to protect citizens and employees."

"We are truly delighted to be able to bring the high-quality content and thought leadership, that International Security Expo portfolio visitors have come to expect, to people’s homes from 30 November – 3 December. While we would all prefer to be meeting face-to-face and connecting with colleagues around the world, we are excited for attendees to experience the high-level style of production and studio setting for the panel discussions, where we’ll cover the latest insights and future trends in physical and cyber security.

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Securing your business while working remotely
Securing your business while working remotely

It's a very common purchase for people to seek a smart security camera to remotely link them to their home whilst at work. Now the emphasis has shifted, with a lot more people working from home, business owners should consider a surveillance device to deter would-be thieves, protecting valuable equipment crucial for businesses to operate successfully. A robust security camera setup can aid existing security staff, and give business owners peace of mind out of hours.    According to a recent report, police forces are having to carry out extra night patrols in empty city and town centres, as burglars target shops, pubs and other commercial premises during the pandemic. During these unprecedented times, investing in a video security system can save you and your business money – and in more than one way. In addition to preventing loss of property from inside, surveillance cameras also prevent acts of theft and vandalism by outside individuals However, technology, improved mobile connectivity, apps, and cloud technologies has changed the security market and made it easy for anyone to set up a surveillance ecosystem with easy installation and constant round the clock, cloud monitoring. Plus, you can access footage from anywhere in the world via devices and apps – just in case you have to skip the country! The best cameras for SMBs Most good cameras have the much same functionality: excellent video and audio capabilities, remote access and programming, motion and sound detection, and the ability to capture still or video images and audio and save the data to the Cloud. But the burning question is, when you're trying to find a need in a haystack, what will work best for a small to medium sized business? A robust security camera setup can aid existing security staff, and give business owners peace of mind out of hours Now you can buy cameras that come packed with features such as integrated night vision, 1080p resolution, microSD card slot for local recording, two-way audio functionality as well as the latest latest 128bit encryption. They also have wide-angle lenses allowing users to see more of their office with a single camera, and some come with free, intelligent AI-Based motion detection. The AI gives users more choices on what is captured by the camera and when they should be alerted. Users can specify what types of motion they would like to detect, such as an intruder as opposed to a dog, an object crossing a defined boundary or into a specific area. They can also define multiple zones, alerting them immediately when movement is detected in particular areas. Easy installation is crucial These security cameras should also be easy enough to install and use that you don't need to fork out for expensive expert installation, and many can work with existing CCTV and CCTV DVR systems you may already have set-up. Many of the business security cameras are Wi-Fi enabled and come with their own apps, so you can view footage on your smartphone or tablet, no matter where you are in the world. It means you don't need to pay for a security team to watch the footage at all times (though if you can afford it, that won't hurt), and you can store your videos locally with an NVR on a HD, in the cloud with mydlink or do both with a hybrid NVR/cloud recorder. The apps use Rich Notifications which send a push notification with snapshot to the mobile device the moment activity is detected. Users can react immediately without the need to log into the app by accessing the camera’s live view or calling one of two pre-assigned contacts with a single tap. Any motion-triggered recordings can be saved in the cloud, or locally on a microSD card. Indoor, Outdoor or both? Indoor cameras can be smaller, more lightweight and are usually less intrusive than bulkier outdoor cameras The primary distinction between indoor and outdoor security cameras is the types of external factors each camera has to be able to withstand. While both types of cameras usually come in similar styles and with comparable features, outdoor cameras need to be able to contend with all types of weather and varying light conditions. Outdoor cameras are also more vulnerable to being tampered with, so they are typically made of more durable materials, like metal, and may be heavier or even housed in a casing in order to discourage easy removal. Indoor cameras can be smaller, more lightweight and are usually less intrusive than bulkier outdoor cameras. Both indoor and outdoor cameras utilise features like infrared, allowing for clear pictures in low light conditions and easy transitions when there is a sudden change in light-changing automatically from colour images in bright light to black and white when it gets darker. When doing your research, features to look out for include: Wide angle lens for optimum room view or full view of the front of your property Full HD 1080p at 30fps   ONVIF compatible - Open Network Video Interface Forum - The forum aims to standardize how IP products within the video surveillance industry communicate with each other. Night vision - look at length of the night vision - 5m is about right Your options will depend on your budget and specific needs, but the above features are a great start when you come to buy.

The future of property security: In-house processing units versus cloud-based video surveillance systems
The future of property security: In-house processing units versus cloud-based video surveillance systems

Nowadays, everything seems easier in the matter of surveillance. Sophisticated technology safeguards our valuables for us without asking for anything in return. But what if it’s not true? What if it comes with a price? Video surveillance systems are a popular way to keep the property under constant control. It’s not rare that the technological sophistication of these systems puts us in awe. They make us feel, and be, safe. Yet, there are doubts when it comes to ensuring privacy. And these worries are understandable. Privacy abusers wait around every corner. Some of the fish for data coming from our monitoring systems. Should we then give up and go back to the in-person property guarding? Not really. Countless advantages make an intelligent video surveillance system worth trying. How to find the best solution within the video surveillance systems? Which system is the most secure in protecting us from the threats of privacy abuse: in-house processing unit, or the cloud? 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We put efforts to protect our privacy, whether it comes to houses, businesses, or sensitive data. Data privacy Why is it so important? Ongoing cases of privacy invasions prove that data finds "new owners" very fast. These data takeovers can result in a major inconvenience and robbery on a large scale. Main privacy threats are information collection, processing, dissemination, and invasion. We want to protect data obtained by video surveillance systems. Privacy and security are sometimes compared to water and oilThese are, for example, video registrations, times of entrance to the property, number and identities of visitors, etc. Privacy and security are sometimes compared to water and oil. They say you can have security but you’ll lose privacy. They say you can have privacy, but you’ll lose security. These common convictions inspired a new generation of companies to create privacy-first security solutions. They are, in other words, security systems focused on not sacrificing privacy. Cloud-based systems Most of the time, popular video surveillance systems but at the same time insecure when it comes to privacy are running on the cloud. There has been a long discussion about its safety and it continues to raise privacy concerns. These systems too often fail in ensuring privacy, and they are vulnerable to hacking. Ring, Nest, and other home security companies experienced compromising mishaps on a large scale. It's not a secret that some cloud-based companies partner up with police departments. Also, if your data is too available, tech companies can sell it to advertisers.Data uploaded onto the cloud is exposed for anyone to meddle with Data uploaded onto the cloud is exposed for anyone to meddle with. According to the book The Age of Surveillance Capitalism_ The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power by Shoshana Zuboff “Nest takes little responsibility for the security of that information and none for how other companies will put it to use. In fact, University of London legal scholars Guido Noto La Diega and Ian Walden, who analysed these documents, reckon that were one to enter into the Nest ecosystem of connected devices and apps, each with their own equally burdensome terms, the purchase of a single home thermostat entails the need to review nearly a thousand contracts.” Security and privacy vanish once a smart home system enables remote access. In-house processing units It all leads to the conclusion that keeping data in the in-house processing unit is safer and more private. It keeps us away from the eyes of governments, corporates, advertisers, and hackers. And since the market is proactive, solutions in that department came fast. Thanks to the advances to the internet of things (IoT), edge computing, and machine learning, it will be possible in the near future to find different surveillance private-secure systems on the market. A privacy-centered "architecture" processes and stores camera footage inside the propertyThey will combine the most advanced technology with sophisticated privacy protection. In the in-house option, a privacy-centered "architecture" processes and stores camera footage inside the property. For example, one Seattle-based startup is working on a solution that uses specialised IP cameras that work in groups with an edge computing device. An AI (artificial intelligence) algorithm analyses all the footage taken by the cameras. Once it detects anomalies, it notifies the final user. Those systems don't upload any of the customers' data to the cloud, they keep privacy and all the information at the customer's home. The in-house processing unit can learn to differentiate what its user marks as important. The system captures and saves only those pieces of information. Smart surveillance systems To give an example: users who wish to know when their dog is outside can set the cameras to detect it. 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Key considerations for robust residential security
Key considerations for robust residential security

In the UK, one burglary occurs every 106 seconds. This means by the time you've finished reading this article, at least three will have taken place. Selecting robust physical security options to protect property boundaries and homes is essential to limit crime rates and deter opportunistic intruders. With 58% of burglaries said to take place while the homeowner is in, it seems that even the second wave of lockdowns, and an increased number of people confined to their homes, won't do much to eliminate the risk of burglary. Prioritise security for peace of mind Security is paramount, and in the case of new build projects, should be considered from the very beginning of the design process, not as an afterthought. When it comes to securing pre-existing buildings, there are countless security options which will ensure the perimeter is robust enough to withstand opportunistic attacks. It's also worth noting that security features don't have to be complicated. There are plenty of high-tech digital systems flooding the market, which can go a long way to reduce the risk of burglary and will provide peace of mind to the end user. However, this article will demonstrate how traditional security measures, such as high-quality perimeter fencing, can ensure practical safeguarding of properties for years to come.  Selecting robust physical security options to protect property boundaries and homes is essential to limit crime rates Timber! There are a number of different materials which can be specified to create a strong boundary. From metal railings, to timber fence panels, they will each help deter criminals somewhat. Wooden fence panels are a popular choice for their appearance, and the right product and installation can help to increase security.Our timber acoustic fencing can also reduce noise by up to 32dB and has a solid face with no hand or footholds, while still retaining the attractive natural timber aesthetic of a typical garden fence. However, maintenance is key, and one of the first thing burglars will notice is the condition a fence is in, rather than a particular style. Therefore, old, broken or rotten fence panels are a green light for opportunistic thieves. These can be easily broken or bypassed with minimal effort. When specifying fences as part of a new build housing development, we would suggest opting for high-quality timber, as this will ensure that it is protected against rot. Look for products with an extended guarantee or those that don't need additional treatment over the years. The condition of the fence should still be regularly inspected, and simple methods such as clearing piles of leaves away from the base of the boundary can help to prevent rot which weakens the timber.  Securing fence panels The recent rising cost of timber has led to a dramatic increase in fence panel theft, and panels that can be lifted from the posts are an easy target. Mitigate this risk by screwing the fence panels into the posts. This makes it much harder for the panels to be removed from the posts and creates a more secure barrier.  Concrete posts do offer benefits, but we always advise on timber posts for any fencing. They're strong, just like concrete, but they continue the same natural theme as the rest of the fence. Moreover, if you screwed the panels to concrete posts, they would most likely crack and become damaged, and then be at risk to the elements.  Astute design Design is also important. Installing fence rails on the inside of properties to prevent them from being used as climbing aids is highly recommended. Even better, using panels without rails on high-end developments is a clever tip if you want a secure fence with a high-spec look. Security features don't have to be complicated High fences with solid panels and no gaps in between make it considerably harder for potential burglars to climb over. They also offer better privacy to conceal rear garden areas from intruders, and are much sturdier than other alternative panels.  One common mistake is designing in features such as trees or children's climbing frames too close to the boundary. These can be used by burglars as climbing aids when attempting to scale the fence, making access easy. Investigate the surrounding area, which flanks the outside of the property boundary, as an unfortunately placed bin or bench can also help criminals gain entry. If the removal of these items is not possible, designing in a spiky bush can help deter intruders. It's also worth noting that gardens with numerous large features such as bushes or sheds can also negatively impact the level of security. A clear line of sight across the entire garden is highly recommended where possible. If this view is blocked, it's considerably easy for intruders to hide undetected. Front gardens  While tall, solid fence panels are recommended for rear gardens to prevent intruders from being able to see in and climb over, the opposite is true for front gardens. For street-facing gardens, a low fence or hedge is recommended to provide a clear view from the house. It also makes it much harder for intruders to hide from passers-by or neighbours, who can raise the alarm during a burglary. Another useful security technique to consider is a gravel drive. These create noise, which means the homeowner will know when it is in use. Pair this with a strong boundary fence, the likelihood of burglary dramatically decreases. This article only scratches the surface in unveiling the sheer volume of effective home security options on offer to protect homes and gardens. These investments can help minimise the risk of traumatic break-ins, while also simultaneously boosting the aesthetic of the property and its surroundings.