Security issues corresponding to controlling access are perceived to be a prime concern and a strenuous challenge in various sectors such as corporate, office, manufacturing units, BFSI, healthcare and hotels.

These arduous challenges require meticulously planned access control strategies. Implementation of such strategies can be employed at exit/entry doors and at data centres. Along with the conventional approach, access control is being enhanced with advanced features, to control access and improve elevator security.

Matrix offers elevator-based access control, which allows access and entry to the elevator using biometric or RFID card credentials, to authorised personnel only, at the allotted time and assigned floors.

Ways to implement

  • Elevator Access Control: Only authorised users can access the elevator, but can access any floor.
  • Floor Access Control: Anyone can access the elevator but only authorised users can access the floors which are permitted by the admin
  • Elevator and Floor Access Control: Only authorised users can access the elevator for the floors that are permitted by admin

How it works

  • COSEC PANEL LITE V2 can be configured in standalone mode for device, user, group and floor configuration.
  • Once a user profile is created, their credential enrolment, floor and group allocation for pre-defined time is configured.
  • The user must show their enrolled credentials to the biometric device located at the Outside Elevator or the Inside Elevator
  • Outside Elevator: To gain access to elevator, a door controller is installed outside the Elevator. The door controller is connected to the elevator call button, which is enabled when an authorised user shows their enrolled credentials
  • Inside Elevator: To enable and access the floors that are assigned to the user, a door controller is installed inside the elevator. Some floors such as the cafeteria, Reception Area or Customer Lounge are kept accessible for visitors/customers.

Advantages and benefits:

Feature Advantage Benefit
Multiple credential-based identification Elevator can be accessed using multiple credentials such as fingerprint, PIN, RFID card, palm vein or a combination of these Flexibility of selecting single or multiple credentials
Users  Create up to 25,000 users Scalability
Time, user and floor-based access control Assign multiple floors to a user for a specified amount of time Security
Encrypted communication Secured end-to-end communication Accurate identification
Hardware integration Alarm, buzzer and call buttons can be integrated with the COSEC ARC IO800 controller Cost reduction
Tamper detection When any tampering is detected, a notification appears on the monitor screen and an alarm goes off Security
ID linking Link input event to an output action as per user requirements Security
Expansion Controlled access for 32 floors in one elevator and 8 elevators in one panel Flexibility and scalability
QR Code-based identification Simply scan a QR Code on your mobile to gain access Reduced cost and installation time, convenience
Communication interface Provides Ethernet and RS-485 connectivity options Convenience

Applications

The solution is highly useful for the circumstances below:

  • To restrict the customer to their specific floor; for example, in hotels, to assign and keep customers to their respective floor for a pre-defined number of days.
  • For multi-floor buildings, where different floors are leased to different companies; for example, corporate offices with multiple floors and having requirement of controlled access to each floor, as it has a high flow of visitors.
  • To limit access on sensitive floors; for example, in manufacturing units, to limit access to sensitive zones to authorised groups only, and by proper authentication.

Target audience

  • Corporate: Elevator Access Control provides secured, speedy and controlled flow of employees and prevents unauthorised personnel penetration, long queues and congestion.
  • Hotels: Provides access to customers for assigned floors only, and at pre-defined times, thereby eliminating commotion and increasing security.
  • Manufacturing: Controlled access only to authorised groups on sensitive floors, which increases security and eliminates trespassers.
  • Healthcare: Manage the flow of patients’ relatives/visitors to the floor on which the patient has been admitted, reducing commotion and maintaining tranquillity on the floor.
  • BFSI: Secured access to sensitive areas such as vaults, which requires an authorised person to go with the customer to access that elevator and floor.

Devices required

  • COSEC PANEL LITE V2
  • COSEC Device: VEGA series, DOOR series and PATH series for authentication. (Any device can be used for authentication for lift as per credential requirement.)
  • COSEC ARC IO800 CONTROLLER. (Controllers required as per number of floors. One COSEC ARC IO800 Controller can be used to control eight floors)

For the system to properly function, COSEC Reader/Controllers installed inside the elevator car, COSEC PANEL LITE and COSEC ARC IO800 controllers should be in communication with each other.

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