Kojak comes with a full featured SDK enabling effective integration into applications requiring certified FAP 60 quality images
Kojak will enable fast enrolment and verification of large groups of people, with capability of capturing ten prints in ten seconds or less

Integrated Biometrics LLC, developers of the most energy-efficient FBI-compliant fingerprint scanners in the world is revolutionising the industry yet again, with the release of its Kojak FAP 60 Appendix F Certified ten print and roll live scanner.

Rugged and lightweight, Kojak will run off of a laptop, tablet or mobile phone without an additional power source for hours while enabling fast enrolment and verification of large groups of people in any environment, with the capability of capturing ten prints in ten seconds or less.

“Integrated Biometrics’ technology is advancing fingerprinting to new levels through its innovative adaptive technology,” Steve Thies, CEO of Integrated Biometrics said, adding, “We felt it important to formally introduce Kojak, the most advanced ten fingerprint scanner, here in our nation’s capital at Connect:ID where the biometrics community is focused on best practices for meeting evolving identity management needs, and supporting the worldwide push toward greater acceptance and use of mobile fingerprint biometrics.”

Meets FBI’s Appendix F certification

Kojak is designed to meet the FBI’s globally accepted Appendix F certification for enrolment and identification standards with applications for national ID, border patrol, state department visa, employment background checks, criminal and terrorist database purposes. Thanks to its small size, weight, and ability to function seamlessly without the need for a wired power source or low lighting conditions, Kojak is the first truly mobile ten-print enrolment and verification sensor in the world.

Kojak is already generating interest as governments and businesses look to new biometrics technologies to enhance security, productivity, and convenience in today’s increasingly connected world. For example, it is being integrated into an unattended kiosk-based identity management program for border security at air and sea ports.

"Kojak is designed for the field as well as the office. People can put these in backpacks and hop on motorcycles to enrol rural populations in the Congo or Pakistan or anywhere you have to bring enrolment and verification programs to the population", says David Gerulski, VP, Integrated Biometrics

Globally, Kojak is designed to support efforts to establish national ID and healthcare programs with ten-print electronic fingerprint enrolment and verification as a means to quickly and effectively validate the identities of millions of people. As groups like the United Nations and World Bank continue pushing for sustainable development in third-world countries to eradicate poverty and fight disease, they are looking to mobile fingerprint biometrics to register entire populations. This effort will reduce fraud and help people get better health and government assistance and guaranteeing they receive funds for microfinance programs.

“Outside of the U.S. you don’t often have access to a desk, power source, or nice air conditioned room with low lighting for electronic fingerprinting,” company Vice President David Gerulski said, adding, “Kojak is designed for the field as well as the office. People can put these in backpacks and hop on motorcycles to enrol rural populations in the Congo or Pakistan or anywhere you have to bring enrolment and verification programs to the population.

“In many third-world nations individuals do not carry identification cards of any kind -- this allows them access to social benefits, healthcare, banking, really the entire world,” he added.

Utilises Integrated Biometrics’ patented light emitting sensor film

Before Kojak, ten-print scanners in the market were optical prism based, requiring heavy, cumbersome kits the size of carry-on suitcases for transporting the device, its batteries and laptop computer. Unlike optical scanners, Kojak utilises Integrated Biometrics’ patented light emitting sensor (LES) film, which is incredibly thin and lightweight, contributing to Kojak’s smaller size.

In addition to size and weight, LES-based scanners differ from optical scanners in function. Optical scanners use secondary light sources to illuminate fingerprints then attempt to capture the image with camera, often struggling or failing to capture the resulting image for large percentages of subjects and requiring lotion for hands, constant cleaning, low environmental lighting, and other special considerations to run prints.

LES-based fingerprint scanners are mechanically tested and guaranteed to a million touches without any impact on image quality, working flawlessly in both direct and indirect sunlight and resisting finger contaminants such as grease, oil, water, dust and chemicals

Rather than needing to illuminate a fingerprint with secondary light sources, LES film actually emits light itself. When a finger is placed in contact with the sensor film, the underside of the film produces the fingerprint image in light, capturing fingerprints in less time and without the need for special environmental considerations. This increases the number of people actually able to utilise the biometric solution.

The durable structure of Integrated Biometrics’ LES film withstands scratching and the typical breakdown associated with biometric devices. LES-based fingerprint scanners are mechanically tested and guaranteed to a million touches without any impact on image quality, working flawlessly in both direct and indirect sunlight and resisting finger contaminants such as grease, oil, water, dust and chemicals.

Kojak’s 3.5” (W) x 3.15” (H) fingerprint surface provides an intuitive user interface and a large template for image generation. It features an intuitive ergonomic design, weighs less than 1.6 pounds, and scans four flat prints, thumbs and single finger rolls, all with extraordinarily low power consumption of

Effective integration into applications requiring certified FAP 60 quality images

Kojak is impervious to latent prints and functions with both dry and dirty fingers, without the need to apply hand lotion. It comes with a full featured SDK enabling effective integration into applications requiring certified FAP 60 quality images, providing for segmentation, smear detection and quality scoring.

Integrated Biometrics offers the only certified sensor that meets mobility requirements demanded by end users, solving the major problems of size, speed, accuracy and durability.

Kojak and the rest of the Integrated Biometrics certified and non-certified products are on display at the company’s Connect:ID booth #111 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center.

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