Specialist property developer and investor, Kajima Properties’ new project development at 77 Coleman Street in the City of London is a luxury multi-tenant office set over seven floors. BNP Paribas acts as the managing agent, while the redevelopment was designed by architect, Buckley Gray Yeoman.

The prominent London location is a minute’s walk from Moorgate Tube station and the Elizabeth Line. The redevelopment included installing elegant external facades as well as creating floors of new office space, and 16,000 sq. feet of retail, leisure and restaurant space.

The site offers exceptional internet reliability and speed for tenants, and is one of just 22 buildings in the UK to achieve a platinum connectivity rating by WiredScore, the Mayor of London’s digital connectivity rating scheme.

Seamless access control system

BNP Paribas and Kajima Properties wanted a seamless and highly efficient access system

BNP Paribas and Kajima Properties wanted a seamless and highly efficient access system to allow bona fide users and visitors easy access through reception and lifts to their desired location. This needed to be underpinned, but not impinged by, a robust security management system including CCTV to keep people and the building safe.

They wanted to keep any waiting time in reception to an absolute minimum to avoid crowding, including good access for disabled users, and for all entry to be touchless. Tenants and reception staff would need an efficient, secure and easy to use system for managing visitors.

While an entry phone and door automation would be required for anyone arriving out-of-hours, or at the rear of the property, such as for deliveries and trades people with equipment.

Bespoke security solutions

Finally, a key part of the brief was for any installed equipment, such as turnstiles and lifts, to be in keeping with the sophisticated, minimal look and feel of the building. The Team Antron Security project managed the design, supply and installation of the access control and security system for 77 Coleman Street and acted as the ‘go to’ contact for client, Kajima Properties and BNP Paribas.

Antron Security is a globally renowned installer of bespoke security solutions and has been providing security installations for the past 29 years. Taking care of the supply, design, installation and maintenance of security systems, Antron Security is NSI approved, meaning all staff and systems installed comply with the latest industry standards and are regularly inspected.

Integriti access and security management system

Inner Range provided the core access and security management system, Integriti, which enabled Antron Security to build the bespoke solutions needed for 77 Coleman Street in London, UK. Inner Range is a globally renowned company in the design and manufacture of intelligent security solutions since 1988.

More than 150,000 Inner Range systems have been installed in over 30 countries till date. The company’s flagship product, Integriti, offers enterprise-level intelligent security and integrated smart building controls for single sites through to global estate portfolios.

Seamless, touchless entry for tenants

Cards are presented to readers embedded in bespoke Integrated Design Limited (IDL) entry turnstiles

The building’s 2000+ regular users are issued secure proximity cards, carrying encrypted information about when and where the user is allowed to go. Cards are presented to readers embedded in bespoke Integrated Design Limited (IDL) entry turnstiles, which also allows them to be read by the KONE lift integration.

The high level lift integration with ‘destination control’ means the lift software takes into account where each of the building’s four lifts are, where the user’s ‘home floor’ is, as well as where other users are going/due to go, and instantly calculates the quickest lift for the new user.

Antron Security and IDL collaboration

The user is immediately directed to the most efficient lift via a display screen on the turnstile. If users are able to go to more than one floor, they can update their preference in the lift itself. For the turnstiles in the reception area, Antron Security and IDL worked closely with the vision set out by the architect to create a high-performing system that was in keeping with the sleek, minimalist design of the building.

A bespoke set up of slim ‘speed lane’ turnstile pedestals, together with a separate glass gate were an ideal solution for a reception area where space is limited but security provisions and good disabled access are needed. IDL’s Glassgate 200 opens away from the user, and closes behind, preventing tailgaters and all IDL items are manufactured in the United Kingdom. Readers for proximity cards and QR codes were set into the speed lanes to create a seamless flow through the reception area.

Fully integrated visitor management system

Inner Range’s Integriti also allowed Forge’s Bluepoint visitor management system to integrate with IDL’s turnstiles and the KONE lifts. For visitors to access tenanted floors within the building, the following has to take place:

  • A tenant creates the meeting via Bluepoint.
  • An email is generated and sent to the visitor’s inbox where they can create a mobile QR code pass and save it to their smart phone wallet.
  • When the visitor arrives, they scan their QR code on their smart phone at the reception desk, at which point their QR code becomes valid on the Integriti access control system.
  • The visitor is then able to enter via IDL’s speed lane turnstiles, and they are directed by the KONE lift display (which is set into the speed lane) to which lift car they need.
  • To leave, the visitor presents their QR code at the speed lane turnstile, which tells the system they’re leaving.
  • The QR codes are only valid for one entry and one exit, and only on the appointment date and at the planned appointment time. Afterwards, the QR code becomes invalid and is deleted from the system.
  • The QR code gives the visitor the ability to access everything they will need, from the entry turnstile and lift through to any locked doors en route.

The integration between Integriti and Forge’s Bluepoint visitor management system was achieved with an XML read/write interface, as well as API integration between a SQL database and a cloud-hosted VMS database based on Microsoft Azure cloud services platform.

BTP XIP intercom system

A BTP XIP intercom system was installed to allow visitors out-of-hours to contact the security team

A BTP XIP intercom system was installed to allow visitors out-of-hours to contact the security team, or for deliveries and trades people to use in order to access doors at the rear of the building.

The XIP system uses an ethernet distribution network, which means the system can be expanded easily, and it’s possible to install long-distance connections that data networks can’t reach.

Hikvision CCTV cameras installed

CCTV cameras from Hikvision’s ‘superior’ range have been installed throughout the site to create a hard-wired IP closed circuit television system. They are integrated with the Integriti access control system, which allows for intelligent ‘cause and effect’ monitoring.

System protocols automatically bring up specific camera feeds for security managers to view in response to alerts, and footage can be viewed holistically along with other information on from Integriti, such as if a door has been left open.

Intelligent access control

Inner Range’s Enterprise product, Integriti, provides seamless integration with a multitude of other smart building management systems, underpinned by robust security. This includes encrypting all communications through every device and interface, and providing intruder detection to European standard EN50131.

Integriti helps building managers create greener, more energy efficient sites by tracking how tenants use the building, and amending heating and lighting settings as a result. Integriti also provides trace reporting, that can identify a user’s movements if they have become unwell and identify who else has been near them.

System benefits for users

  • Touch-free entry to the building via the speed lanes and lifts.
  • No unnecessary stops for users and visitors on their way into the building.
  • Less crowding in the lift areas.
  • Easy to use visitor management system.
  • Robust security that doesn’t impinge on access.
  • Sleek and minimal design in keeping with the building design.

Jamie Crane, Commercial Director at Antron Security, stated “The flexibility of Inner Range’s Integriti access control system and Forge’s Bluepoint visitor management allowed us to incorporate high-level lift integration (known as ‘destination control’).

He adds, “Together, they create a future-proof solution as we can continue to meet the ever-changing requirements of the landlord and tenants via our ability to integrate with third party systems and devices such as lifts, intercoms, lighting and building management devices.

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