The Ava Group was formed from the takeover of MaxSec Group (MSP) by Future Fibre Technologies Limited (FFT) in December 2017, with the new group name approved at the EGM on 10th May 2018.

Merging MSP and FFT

The group is a provider of risk management services and technologies, used by commercial, industrial, military and government companies across the world. The Ava Group encompasses Future Fibre Technologies and both MaxSec Group companies - BQT Solutions and Ava Global.

The Group features a range of complementary solutions including intrusion detection and location for perimeters, pipelines and data networks, biometric and card access control, as well as secure international logistics, storage of high value assets and risk consultancy services. For decades, the Ava Group continues to build upon a portfolio of premium services and technologies for the most complex and demanding markets.The group is a provider of risk management services and technologies, used by commercial, industrial, military and government companies across the world

The new group will operate under two divisions – a Services Division (Ava) and a Technology Division (FFT and BQT). The merger represents a unification of three firms. Each company holds similar values and philosophies about how to do business; producing an excellent service for the customer, with an emphasis on integrity and transparency.

New appointment as Group CEO

The Ava Group has announced that Chris Fergus was appointed Group Chief Executive Officer. Chris commented: “I am excited to lead the group under the new identity of ‘Ava Group’, leveraging the combined strengths of our experienced leadership team and innovative products and services to build a Sales and Marketing focussed global Risk Management organisation.”

Chris has extensive experience within the security integration and services sectors. For the past two years Chris has been the CEO of Ava Global, and SVP Strategy and Business Development for MaxSec Group Limited (MSP), and served as an Executive Director on the board of MSP. Chris has also served as a Director of FFT for the previous 18 months.

Chris was previously employed for 20 years with G4S, most recently as Regional Managing Director, Middle East, managing a portfolio of Security & FM joint ventures with a total revenue in excess of US$1 billion.

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