Digital Barriers, a provider of edge-intelligent surveillance and security technologies, announces the release of a real-time remote fever scanning solution that adds remote monitoring to this capability. Fever scanning cameras help safeguard frontline workers against potential infection.

The addition of Digital Barriers’ government-grade remote monitoring enables this to be carried out without the need for close human contact, thereby cutting the risk of transmission. Providing both a thermal and HD optical camera, Digital Barriers’ unique EdgeVis Live technology ensures reliable real-time standoff temperature detection and profiling, even in locations with poor bandwidth and network connectivity.

Quickly identifying staff and customers

The thermal camera analyses body temperature, a key indicator of the presence of a fever, and sounds an alarm when a specific temperature threshold is exceeded. The solution provides hospitals, primary care clinics, pharmacies, chemists, warehouses, distribution centres and commercial buildings with a highly effective means of quickly identifying staff and customers who show signs of an infection, minimising transmission on-site.

Digital Barriers’ remote fever scanning solution can be deployed as a standalone system

Zak Doffman, CEO at Digital Barriers, said “Protecting key workers has never been more vital and we’re pleased that EdgeVis Live, our resilient live streaming capability, can play a crucial role in remotely identifying potential carriers of any likely infection, thus safeguarding those we are relying on most as well as the wider public.” Digital Barriers’ remote fever scanning solution can be deployed as a standalone system or as part of a network, linked to a centralised command and control location.

Delivering bandwidth savings

Digital Barriers’ products deliver live video streaming over ultra-low bandwidths, including live bodycam, vehicle and safe city solutions. Typically delivering bandwidth savings of more than 50%, the IoT products make wireless video surveillance a reality.

The core technology was designed for security and defence but has much wider applications. It includes edge-AI analytics, such as facial recognition and intrusion detection. Existing customers include government and commercial organisations in more than sixty countries.

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