Haier Group, China’s home appliance manufacturer, has built a new industrial park in Russia to cope with the growing demand in Europe. Covering a total area of about 124.9 hectares, the new site is located in Naberezhnye Chelny, an important industrial city in Tatarstan, Russia.

With the gradual completion of its factories in the industrial park, Haier is looking for an intelligent system to realise multiple tasks within the whole industrial park. First, to prevent theft and timely detect people climbing over the perimeter fence. Second, to provide comprehensive monitoring in the whole industrial park and inside the factory which includes: monitoring of production line and employees’ smoking behaviour during working hours at office areas; efficient employee attendance; vehicle identification at the entrance and exit areas of the industrial park; and the overall management of all devices, data report output, etc.

Intrusion detection

The Dahua Russia team designed a complete smart solution incorporating AI cameras, perimeter cameras, ANPR system, access control, time attendance system, face recognition barrier, DSS PRO platform and EVS storage for Haier’s industrial park. Notably, all of the devices were integrated in one central management platform, making it easier for operators to control and manage the system. In addition, the system also supports further device upgrade based on customer’s future plan for the next several years.

AI-powered perimeter protection function can greatly reduce false alarms caused by irrelevant objects

To help Haier solve the first problem, Dahua 5MP WDR IR Bullet AI Network Cameras were chosen to safeguard the perimeter of the Haier industrial park. Featuring active deterrence, the cameras are able to proactively warn intruders to leave before users take action. Once an intrusion is detected, a white light will turn on, accompanied by a buzzer to warn off the intruder. Additionally, its AI-powered perimeter protection function can greatly reduce false alarms caused by irrelevant objects. The combination of advanced AI analytics and real-time alerts to a desktop or mobile clients reduces system requirements and resources, thereby improving the efficiency of the surveillance system.

Smart IR technology

The office areas and the interior of the washing machine factory are covered with Dahua 4MP WDR IR Dome Network Cameras, while public areas are monitored by 2MP 25x Starlight IR PTZ Network Cameras.

As a member of Dahua Eco-savvy product family, the Dahua 4MP WDR IR Dome Network Cameras adopt upgraded H.265 encoding technology to provide starlight, Smart IR technology, as well as intelligent image analysis techniques. It saves bandwidth and storage, with energy-saving design to enhance monitoring performance of the system. With built-in Intelligent Video System (IVS) analytic algorithm, these dome cameras also support intelligent functions to monitor a scene for tripwire violations, intrusion detection, and abandoned or missing objects. In the future, it can respond quickly and accurately to events in the monitored areas.

These cameras are equipped with smooth control, high quality image and good protection

As for public areas, Dahua 2MP 25x Starlight IR PTZ Network Cameras have powerful optical zoom and accurate pan/tilt/zoom performance that can provide a large monitoring range and rich details. Through the latest Starlight technology, the cameras can achieve excellent low-light performance. In addition, these cameras are equipped with smooth control, high quality image and good protection, which meet the requirements of most industrial parks.

Face recognition

Dahua face recognition barriers were deployed at the entrance of the Haier industrial park and its office building, allowing quick and touchless passage of registered Haier employees without using employee cards or other identification documents. The system is based on a deep learning algorithm powered by AI, which compares facial images captured by the camera with those stored in the library to verify a person’s identity and grant permission. Access will be denied for unregistered people.

The industrial park’s entrance and exit use 2 Megapixel Full HD AI Access ANPR Cameras to identify entering and exiting vehicles. Boasting a capture rate of over 99%, the cameras can automatically recognise the number plate of a vehicle in low speed less than 40 kmph, and capture vehicle data such as vehicle direction, vehicle size and vehicle colour detection (in daytime) based on deep learning algorithm. Aside from these capabilities, the cameras can also control the barrier according to the whitelist set by users and let registered vehicles pass without stopping.

The Dahua DSS PRO management platform integrates all cameras and the aforementioned devices

At the management centre, all the information collected by font-end cameras will be transferred to a 16-HDD Enterprise Video Storage. With Seagate HDD, the device offers unparalleled capacity performance for users to store massive videos and obtain evidence when needed. The Dahua DSS PRO management platform integrates all cameras and the aforementioned devices, allowing operators to easily control and manage the system.

Up-to-date Dahua AI equipment

Dahua Technology’s smart industrial park solution has assisted Haier in creating a modern intelligent industrial park in Russia. The up-to-date Dahua AI equipment provides Haier a long-term smart security system with upgraded security level and enhanced management efficiency.

The traditional personnel management system requires manual registering of employee information and cards to enter and exit office areas, which is inefficient and difficult to manage, and often high in cost. Upgrading the access verification system is crucial for modern companies like Haier in order to increase the security level of its industrial park and office building. We look forward to our future cooperation,” said Zhao Shengbo, Regional Director of Dahua CIS.

During the requirement discussion, solution design, and engineering survey, Dahua shows professionalism and excellent communication skills. Haier is satisfied with the first step cooperation and looking forward to the second step of the project,” said Liu Wei, Overseas Regional Project Manager of Haier Group.  

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