Notting Hill Media News

Who’s afraid of IP? Nobody needs to be in today’s market

Conventional wisdom has been that analogue video has remained popular at the lower end of the security market because of the complexity of installing IP systems. The proliferation of NVR appliances, self-configuring systems and end-to-end solutions today addresses the requirements of even small systems and has overcome issues of complexity. The new systems are plug-and-play and require little expertise on the part of the installer. Ease of installation was among last obstacles to total IP adopti...

Needed: Attention-grabbing technology in an emergency

“A wealth of information creates a poverty of attention.” So said Herbert A. Simon, American Political Scientist, Economist, Sociologist, Psychologist, and Professor. I heard that quote at the Avigilon presentation at IFSEC, repeated by Ian Povey, Avigilon’s director of product marketing and product management. He used the quote to support the need for more (accurate) video analytics. In other words, without analytics, there is so much video information that the operator&rsquo...

The Droids are here: new security helpers are less than human – or at least different

While riding the Tube in London during IFSEC, I came across an attention-grabbing headline in a newspaper someone left in the next seat: “Coming To a Workplace Near You: RoboOfficeCop.” The article was about a robot that can patrol an office, checking that doors are shut and desks are uncluttered, using cameras and scanners to see whether anything is out of the ordinary. If something is amiss, the 6-ft-tall machine can store information to a hard drive to be reported later to a huma...

ONVIF, SIA collaborating on new access control standards

The next generation of access control standards will be developed by the recently announced collaboration between the Open Network Video Interface Forum (ONVIF) and the Security Industry Association (SIA), the American trade association headquartered in Silver Spring, Md., near Washington, D.C. Both organisations have staked a claim in the area of access control standards, and now they’re seeing their interests converge. SIA’s Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP) standard addresse...

IFSEC Day Three: Assessing the benefits of a productive show

The third day of a trade show is when you start feeling like Bill Murray in that movie "Ground Hog Day." It's like you're living the same day over and over -- the same waiter at breakfast, the same (or at least interchangeable) crowds on the London Underground, the same frowning man waiting to scan your badge, the same frantic search to find your badge among multiple pockets (coinciding with the same brief moment of panic). Another day, another group of suppliers to visit, and some of the theme...

Day Two: IFSEC reflects the diverse, global security market

I am visiting IFSEC for the first time in several years, and one revelation is how well the event reflects the increasingly global - and diverse - nature of the security market. On the second day of the show, I was struck by the diversity of attendees, apparent in the many languages you hear spoken in the exhibit hall. I also kept coming upon confirmation of the variety of global security companies from around the world who are exhibiting at the event -- another reflection of a thriving worldwid...

Announcements and food for thought at the first day of IFSEC

It took a crowded ride during rush hour on the London “Tube” to get me there, including multiple transfers, but the first day of IFSEC at its new venue, the ExCel in London, yielded a couple of newsy announcements and busy traffic at many of the stands. The industry is still reeling from bombshell news last week of the acquisition of Milestone by Canon. The ink may be barely dry, but the agreement was celebrated at IFSEC with a press event and big photo opportunity involving Rokus v...

The NRA reminds us: Words have power to persuade

You can depend on the National Rifle Association (NRA) to enter the conversation after almost any high-profile violent incident, and such was the case recently after a 22-year-old college student went on a deadly rampage outside the main campus of the University of California, Santa Barbara. Thirteen were injured and six young adults lost their lives, including the perpetrator. After the tragedy, “NRA News Commentator” Dom Raso took issue with what he called “inaccuracy of the...

Are we immune to the shock value of school shootings?

Another week, another school shooting. Or so it seems recently with all the incidents in the U.S. news media. Just this week there was another one in Troutdale, Ore. In fact, the organisation Everytown for Gun Safety says there have been roughly 74 school shootings since the well-remembered tragedy in Newtown, Conn., about 18 months ago. Counting just the weeks school has been in session since then, the number is more than a shooting a week. The organization lists the shootings on their web sit...

Tackling the challenge of low-light imaging for megapixel cameras

Low-light imaging has historically been a problem for megapixel cameras. Arecont Vision, like other megapixel camera manufacturers, has struggled to solve the dilemma of low-light images, which are plagued by noise, smearing of video, high bit rates (requiring additional storage) and loss of colour. Arecont Vision says it now has the answer, dubbing it STELLAR technology. The “LL” in the middle of STELLAR stands for “low-light;” the entire acronym sta...

Home automation welcoming a new player to the market: Apple

The security market is awash in stories about how big companies sought to step in and transform the market, from GE to Cisco to several cable or telecom companies. There is generally a lot of hand-wringing over “what it means” when you hear about a big company entering the market. So far the impact of bigger players on our status quo as a fragmented market has been minimal, but it still causes waves when a big company sets its sights on security. Such is the case with Apple, the late...

Frank De Fina, the man who put Samsung on the U.S. video surveillance map, departs

Frank De Fina put Samsung on the map related to video surveillance in the United States market. Five years ago, before the longtime Panasonic executive signed on, the Samsung brand had little traction in the U.S. surveillance market, although the Korean giant was already well known in the broader electronics market. Back then Samsung surveillance cameras were thought of as inferior to Panasonic, Sony or the other brands – if they were thought of at all. Five years later, Samsung is climbi...