Wagtail’s customers include the UK Border Force for whom they provide live body detection teams
Wagtail MD, Collin Singer, will be presenting two sessions of the Exhibitor Workshop Programme

Wagtail UK, supplier of Specialist Detection Dogs, will be exhibiting and presenting two workshop sessions at Global Security Asia, Singapore from the 3-5 March 2015.

Wagtail is one of Europe’s leading specialist dog companies providing dogs and handlers for a wide variety of uses including detection of explosives, firearms, drugs, cash, tobacco, live bodies and human remains (cadaver). Their customers include the UK Border Force for whom they are the sole provider of live body detection teams at border crossing points in Northern France. These teams operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

Collin Singer, MD of Wagtail will be presenting two sessions of the Exhibitor Workshop Programme, entitled: “Detection Dogs – The Smugglers Worst Enemy”.

The sessions will be held at the Workshop Area within the Exhibition Hall at 12.30 on the 4th March 2015 and 14.00 on the 5th March 2015, or visit them on their stand - 1642

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