A blockbuster keynote lineup, revamped education programme, revitalised networking events, and a reimagined exhibit floor energised ASIS International’s 63rd Annual Seminar and Exhibits (ASIS 2017) last week in Dallas, Texas. The show, organised by the association for security management professionals, convened September 25-28 and attracted 22,000 global registrants from 96 countries. The event was produced in partnership with InfraGard and ISSA and drew positive reviews from attendees, exhibitors, and industry partners.

 ASIS 2017 attendance

There was an unmistakable buzz in Dallas. Despite several natural disasters around the globe in the weeks leading up to our show, security professionals came out in droves to exchange ideas, best practices, and experience first-hand the most innovative products and services on the market,” said Thomas J. Langer, CPP, 2017 president of ASIS International. “From the standing-room only education sessions to the jam-packed exhibit hall, ASIS fulfilled its promise to deliver the security industry’s premier event.”

Keynote speakers share security perspectives

Keynote speakers set the tone for each day, with George W. Bush, Mark Cuban, and Scott Klososky sharing their perspectives on the current threat landscape and the risks/potential of innovative technologies reshaping society and the way we do business. The Global Responses to Global Threats panel of international security experts focused on private-public sector collaboration, and Carey Lohrenz closed out the week with a call for fearless leadership. Eddie Sorrells, CPP, PSP, PCI and Chief Operating Officer/General Counsel of DSI Security Services commented, “I don’t remember a conference that had a more dynamic and impressive slate of speakers.”

"From the energy on the show floor to the one-on-one executive-level conversations that occurred, I found great value in the opportunities ASIS 2017 provided"

 ASIS education sessions

The education program featured more than 180 sessions spanning the security spectrum from ASIS, InfraGard, and ISSA subject matter experts. New education formats—including deep dives, case studies, and mock trials—provided a more immersive and interactive learning environment for attendees at all experience levels. New this year, Global Access LIVE! provided live streaming of select education sessions and keynotes.

First time attendee Rick Derks, CSO, FCS Financial, noted that ASIS 2017 offered “an opportunity to interact with thought leaders from both the operational and the cyber communities in meaningful discussions. The event was executed flawlessly, and I was impressed by the professionalism of everyone involved. Due to my positive experience, ASIS International now has a new member.”

Veteran attendee Mike Howard, Chief Security Officer, Microsoft noted, “the changes implemented for this year’s event made a huge impact across the board. From the energy on the show floor to the one-on-one executive-level conversations that occurred, I found great value in the opportunities ASIS 2017 provided.”

Reimagining the exhibit hall

The reimagined exhibit hall featured more than 575 exhibitors showcasing new and emerging products and technologies such as machine learning, robotics, forensic analysis, and artificial intelligence. The floor also hosted two “impact learning” theatres, a career centre, international trade centre, virtual reality zone, and the ASIS Hub—a one-stop shop for all things ASIS including fireside chats, council booths, and livestream interviews from Security Guy Radio.

ASIS 2017 delivered a prime audience to promote our software solutions that leverage emerging technologies such as mixed reality, artificial intelligence and machine learning,” said Drew Weston, Director of Sales and Marketing, CodeLynx. “The addition of the high-quality content on the show floor not only offered us an opportunity to learn ourselves, but drove attendees and ‘buzz’ to the exhibition. We had consistent booth traffic and positive interactions with buyers, and have already reserved our spot for Vegas.”

"The addition of the high-quality content on the show floor not only offered us an opportunity to learn ourselves, but drove attendees and ‘buzz’ to the exhibition"

Exhibitor satisfaction was at an all-time high in Dallas, reflected not only in the feedback, but in space selection for ASIS 2018 in Las Vegas. Coming out of the 2017 event, 80% of the net square footage from the show floor has already been committed for 2018, with 35 companies increasing their space allocation. In addition, notable brands like Mobotix Corporation, Ford Motor Company, UrgentLink and others not exhibiting in Dallas have already committed for next year?

Premier security networking event

ASIS 2017 also enhanced its networking event line-up with an Opening Night Celebration on Sunday, September 24 at Gilley’s Dallas and the President’s Reception at AT&T Stadium on Wednesday, September 27. Both events drew significant crowds and provided ideal bookends to an intensive week of security solutions and professional development.

In conjunction with the event, ASIS gave back to the Dallas community through its Security Cares program, featuring free security preparedness and prevention education for small/medium-sized businesses and community institutions. ASIS also awarded CityLab High School with a $22,000 grant and additional in-kind donations from Axis Communications to support campus-wide security upgrades.

The benefits of this show reach well beyond those who attended a session or toured the exposition floor,” said Peter J. O’Neil, CEO, ASIS International. “Attendees leave empowered with the information, professional network, and exposure to products and services they need to protect the people, property, and assets entrusted to their care. And throughout the year, they know they can turn to their ASIS community for support and peer advice. Our year-round commitment to excellence and reinvestment in the security profession is what differentiates the Society and our event.”

ASIS 2018 takes place September 23-27 in Las Vegas, Nevada, in partnership with InfraGard, ISSA, and a robust lineup of supporting organisations.

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