Milestone Husky NVRs answer market’s need  for more storage
Milestone Husky NVRs answer market’s need for more storage

Milestone Systems, the open platform company in IP video management software (VMS), announces upgrades to its series of Milestone Husky network video recorders (NVRs). The sleek video network appliances integrated with Milestone video management software now offer significant increases in internal storage. Popular NVR Series Meet Market Demands The storage expansions mean simple-to-install video surveillance solutions are available for more demanding requirements – longer video retention and greater quality recordings. More storage enables customers like government organisations to meet 90-day video storage requirements or casinos to achieve continuous high-resolution recordings. 2x the storage on the Milestone Husky M10 – up to 2TB (from 1TB) 3x the storage on the Milestone Husky M30 – up to 12TB (from 4TB) 2x the storage on the Milestone Husky M50 – up to 48TB (from 24TB) Additionally, the Milestone Husky Hybrid Series of NVRs will get a boost in storage too. The hybrid NVRs, which enables users to mix of analog and IP cameras for an easy analog-to-IP transition, offers the following options: 2x the storage on the Milestone Husky M30 Hybrid – up to 8TB (from 4TB) 2x the storage on the Milestone Husky M50 Hybrid – up to 32TB (from 16TB) Unlimited scalability through Milestone Interconnect Like other Milestone VMS solutions, Milestone Husky solutions are future-proof, enabling users to scale up their video surveillance deployments as their businesses grow. Multiple Milestone Husky M30s or Milestone Husky M50s can be set up with a master/slave configuration. Users can view video from all connected cameras on the networked Milestone Husky units by simply connecting to the master server. For enterprise scaling, all Milestone Husky NVRs can also use Milestone Interconnect™ to connect remote sites to XProtect® Corporate VMS for central command and control. This enables a site with a Milestone Husky NVR to be operated locally or remotely, which either could be through a central control center or by a service provided from a Milestone Partner. The functionality of the Milestone Husky M30 and Milestone Husky M50 models can be extended by integrating XProtect® add-ons and third-party integrations, such as access control and video analytics. “We recognised the shift in the market for integrated NVR solutions,” said Jay Shah, Global Business Development Director, Incubation and Ventures at Milestone Systems. “Our Milestone partners and customers asked us for more storage with the Milestone Husky Series and we delivered. Now they can integrate and interconnect the NVRs in more demanding environments. This change can only open up new opportunities for our end users and our integrators.”

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Milestone pre-announces Husky M500A high performance NVR with support for 512 HD cameras and 600Mb/s recording performance
Milestone pre-announces Husky M500A high performance NVR with support for 512 HD cameras and 600Mb/s recording performance

Milestone Systems, the open platform company in networked video management software (VMS), is pre-announcing the Milestone Husky M500A NVR hardware platform with scalable VMS.  The M500A XProtect Expert NVR has been performance-tested to support 512 HD cameras with a guaranteed recording performance of 600Mb/s. Milestone is currently preparing the Milestone Husky M500A for release in Q2 2016 and will be showcasing proof-of-performance at tradeshows in the meantime.  Western Digital Purple hard drives The Milestone Husky M500A is building on the high performance exclusive hardware design of the Milestone Husky M50 chassis right in step with the previous Milestone Husky series. A key contribution to the NVR’s performance is the storage systems use of Western Digital Purple hard drives. These drives are specially designed for video surveillance and utilise write-optimised hard disk drive technology and frame loss protection.  When combined with a video recording optimised RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) Controller supporting either RAID 5 or RAID 10, the industry’s highest performance NVR in its hardware class is achieved. The M500A NVR supports up to 48TB of internal raw storage and has the ability to archive to network-attached storage appliances when additional storage is required.  Milestone XProtect Expert VMS Preinstalled with highly scalable Milestone XProtect Expert video management software, the M500A NVR eliminates the guess work of sizing the recording hardware. This removes the common industry problem of over estimating and sizing IT server-based NVRs as well as saving time on systems design.  The XProtect Expert VMS comes preloaded on the Husky M500A and enables a number of advantages for Milestone partners. These include already being trained and certified on the system software and being able to easily upgrade customers from previous Milestone XProtect products like XProtect Enterprise. Milestone Husky M500A will be sold in a base configuration only, so partners just add camera licences as needed. Three years of Milestone Care Plus plan and hardware warranty are included in all units, enabling both free software upgrades, device licence portability and software trade-in credit. This guarantees that customers get the industry’s lowest possible NVR total cost of ownership.  Key features included are: "The industry’s highest NVRperformance is delivered bythe most scalable and reliableVMS - all packed into ouroptimised NVR at the lowest cost per recorded device" Recorder or all-in-one: The Husky M500A can be utilised as a NVR which is a part of a larger video management software installation or as a stand-alone system. This gives partners and customers with the greatest number of deployment options form a single hardware platform.    Federated NVR support: The Husky M500A XProtect Expert NVR can be easily Federated into existing XProtect Corporate customer deployments at no additional cost. This provides seamless management, configuration, control and viewing of camera devices.   Licence portability: XProtect Expert 2016 base and device licences can be moved between systems just by clicking in the Milestone management console. This enables a customer to have a pool of camera licences and use them as needed. This solves the traditional problem where a system must be upgraded in chunks of licences. It also makes scheduled maintenance easy.    Recorder failover: When using the newest version of XProtect Expert 2016R2 the M500A can utilise the built-in recorder failover capability. This enables the M500A to fail over to a central XProtect Expert system or another M500A if the system is hit by an unforeseen outage. This takes place automatically, without any interruption in system security level.    Simplified installation and setup: The Husky Configurator automates the hardware and software setup and system restore image. This saves valuable installation and setup time.   “The industry’s highest NVR performance is delivered by the most scalable and reliable VMS - all packed into our optimised NVR at the lowest cost per recorded device. It does not get better than this!” says Bjørn Skou Eilertsen, Vice President of Corporate Products Business Unit at Milestone Systems. “The Milestone Husky M500A is yet another proof-point of our commitment to delivering the most valuable solutions for our partners and customers.” The Milestone Husky M500A proof-of-performance was showcased at the ISC West International trade show in Las Vegas, April 6-8, at the Milestone booth 20060 where visitors saw the live performance test of 512 HD cameras being recorded on the new Husky M500A XProtect Expert NVR.

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Milestone Husky™ NVR Series with extended storage at IFSEC International 2015
Milestone Husky™ NVR Series with extended storage at IFSEC International 2015

Milestone invites you to join us at IFSEC International 2015. The Milestone team looks forward to meeting you and will be joined on our booth by eight ecosystem partners that will showcase vertical solutions featuring transportation, city surveillance, retail and critical infrastructure. The latest Milestone video surveillance solutions will also be showcase: XProtect® video management software Gain an understanding of our powerful and easy-to-use software with a wide array of features for basic to advanced surveillance needs. NEW! XProtect® LPR 2015 The new 2015 version of XProtect LPR empowers operators to use the power of automatic vehicle detection to make decisions. With extended geographical coverage and new reporting functions, XProtect LPR can be used in a wide set of application areas, including access control, theft prevention, loyalty programs, toll road and border control. Milestone Husky™ NVR Series The Milestone Husky Series now offers longer video retention and continuous high-resolution recordings. The innovative Milestone Husky Series is the result of challenging the convention and delivering a more powerful, all-in-one solution with optimised processing power to meet the stringent demands of any surveillance environment. Milestone Integration Lab Do you have a project that requires non-standard integration and not sure how to proceed? Or, do you have a product or service you want to integrate with Milestone and wonder what is the right approach? Bring your integration projects to the Milestone Integration Lab and have a chat with the integration experts from Milestone's R&D department. The Milestone Integration Lab is ideal for potential Solution Partners, Project Managers or CTOs responsible for designing solutions or creating A&E specifications. Come visit the Milestone Integration Lab at the Milestone booth to find out more! The Milestone Integration Lab will be open every day during the IFSEC show room hours 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. (Except Thursday: 1 p.m.- 4 p.m.)

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Network Video Recorders (NVRs) - Expert commentary

How to choose the right storage card for video surveillance systems
How to choose the right storage card for video surveillance systems

With increased demands being placed on safety and security globally, and supported by advancements in IP cameras and 360-degree camera technology, the video surveillance industry is growing steadily. Market research indicates that this worldwide industry is expected to reach an estimated $39.3 billion in revenue by 2023, driven by a CAGR of 9.3 percent from 2018 to 2023. Video surveillance is not just about capturing footage (to review an event or incident when it occurs), but also about data analysis delivering actionable insights that can improve operational efficiencies, better understand customer buying behaviours, or simply just provide added value and intelligence. Growth of Ultra-HD surveillance To ensure that the quality of the data is good enough to extract the details required to drive these insights, surveillance cameras are technologically evolving as well, not only with expanded capabilities surrounding optical zoom and motion range,4K Ultra HD-compliant networked cameras are expected to grow from 0.4 percent shipped in 2017, to 28 percent in 2021 but also relating to improvements in signal-to-noise (S2N) ratios, light sensitivities (and the minimum illumination needed to produce usable images), wide dynamic ranges (WDR) for varying foreground and background illumination requirements, and of course, higher quality resolutions. As such, 4K Ultra HD-compliant networked cameras are expected to grow from 0.4 percent shipped in 2017, to 28 percent in 2021, representing an astonishing 170 percent growth per year, and will require three to six times the storage space of 1080p video dependent on the compression technology used. Surveillance cameras are typically connected to a networked video recorder (NVR) that acts as a gateway or local server, collecting data from the cameras and running video management software (VMS), as well as analytics. Capturing this data is dependent on the communications path between individual cameras and the NVR. If this connection is lost, whether intentional, unintentional, or a simple malfunction, surveillance video will no longer be captured and the system will cease operations. Therefore, it has become common to use microSD cards in surveillance cameras as a failsafe mechanism. Despite lost connectivity to the NVR, the camera can still record and capture raw footage locally until the network is restored, which in itself, could take a long time depending on maintenance staff or equipment availability, weather conditions, or other unplanned issues. Since microSD cards play a critical role as a failsafe mechanism to ensure service availability, it is important to choose the right card for capturing video footage.  It has become common to use microSD cards in surveillance cameras as a failsafe mechanism if an NVR breaks Key characteristics of microSDs There are many different microSD cards to choose from for video capture at the network’s edge, and they range from industrial grade capabilities to commercial or retail grade, and everything in-between. To help make some of these uncertainties a little more certain, here are the key microSD card characteristics for video camera capture. Designed for surveillance As the market enjoys steady growth, storage vendors want to participate and have done so with a number of repurposed, repackaged, remarketed microSD cards targeted for video surveillance but with not much robustness, performance or capabilities specific to the application. Adding the absence of mean-time between failure (MTBF) specifications to the equation, microSD card reliability is typically a perceived measurement -- measured in hours of operation and relatively vague and hidden under metrics associated with the camera’s resolution and compression ratio. Therefore, when selecting a microSD card for surveillance cams at the edge, the choice should include a vendor that is trusted, has experience and a proven storage portfolio in video surveillance, and in microSD card technologies. Endurance, as it relates to microSD cards, represents the number of rewrites possible before the card can no longer store data correctly  High endurance Endurance, as it relates to microSD cards, represents the number of rewrites (program/erase cycles) that are possible before the card can no longer store data correctly. The rewrite operation is cyclical whereby a new stream of footage replaces older content by writing over it until the card is full, and the cycle repeats. The higher the endurance, the longer the card will perform before it needs to be replaced. Endurance is also referred to in terabytes written (TBW) or by the number of hours that the card can record continuously (while overwriting data) before a failure will occur. Health monitoring Health monitoring is a desired capability that not many microSD cards currently support and enables the host system to check when the endurance levels of a card are low and needs to be replaced. Having a card that supports this capability enables system integrators and operators with the ability to perform preemptive maintenance that will help to reduce system failures, as well as associated maintenance costs. Performance To capture continuous streams of raw footage, microSD cards within surveillance cams perform write operations about seventy to ninety percent of the time, whereas reading captured footage is performed about ten to thirty percent. The difference in read/write performance is dependent on whether the card is used in an artificial intelligent (AI) capable camera, or a standard one.   microSD cards deployed within surveillance cameras should support temperature ranges from -25 degrees Celsius to 85 degrees Celsius Finding a card that is write-friendly, and can provide enough bandwidth to properly capture streamed data, and is cost-effective, requires one that falls between fast industrial card capabilities and slower commercial ones. Bandwidth in the range of 50 MB/sec for writes and 80 MB/sec for reads are typical and sufficient for microSD cards deployed within surveillance cameras. Temperature ranges Lower capacity support of 32GB can provide room to attract the smaller or entry-level video surveillance deployments As microSD cards must be designed for continuous operation in extreme weather conditions and a variety of climates, whether located indoors or out, support for various temperature ranges are another consideration. Given the wide spectrum of temperatures required by the camera makers, microSD cards deployed within surveillance cameras should support temperature ranges from -25 degrees Celsius to 85 degrees Celsius, or in extreme cases, as low as -40 degrees Celsius. Capacity Selecting the right-sized capacity is also very important as there needs to be a minimum level to ensure that there is enough room to hold footage for a number of days or weeks before it is overwritten or the connectivity to the NVR is restored. Though 64GB is considered the capacity sweet spot for microSD cards deployed within surveillance cameras today, lower capacity support of 32GB can provide room to attract the smaller or entry-level video surveillance deployments. In the future, even higher capacities will be important for specific use cases and will potentially become standard capacities as the market evolves. When choosing the right storage microSD card to implement into your video surveillance system, make sure the card is designed specifically for the application – does it include the right levels of endurance and performance to capture continuous streams – can it withstand environmental challenges and wide temperature extremes – will it enable preventative and preemptive maintenance to provide years of service? It is critical for the surveillance system to be able to collect video footage whether the camera is connected to an NVR or is a standalone camera as collecting footage at the base of the surveillance system is the most crucial point of failure. As such, failsafe mechanisms are required to keep the camera recording until the network is restored.

Enhancing video surveillance data storage with active archive solution
Enhancing video surveillance data storage with active archive solution

By 2020, video surveillance using fixed, body and mobile cameras is expected to capture an astounding 859 PB of video daily. Increasing retention regulations and higher resolution cameras, are forcing the video surveillance industry to reassess its approach to data storage. Large capacity primary storage tends to be expensive to procure and costly to implement – especially without a sound architecture that can balance storage performance levels with the speed of access needed to recall video footage. Active archive strategy These challenges are thrusting storage tiers to the forefront of system design. Storage tiers in video surveillance had previously meant simply using a separate archive or attaching add-on capacity directly to network video recorders. Many of the new storage options designed for video surveillance are pulling together different storage tiers into a single storage architecture Many of the new storage options designed for video surveillance are pulling together different storage tiers (and in some cases storage media) into a single storage architecture, such as an active archive solution. This balance can be achieved with an active archive strategy that automates migration of data between different storage types, to ensure the data is on the correct storage type at the correct time to meet performance and retention requirements without blowing the budget. This approach also ensures ease of access while automatically moving content from more expensive tiers of storage to more cost-effective long-term tiers of storage. This allows for greater efficiencies in how recorded footage is treated throughout its lifecycle. In some cases, it includes moving data from edge devices to centralised storage, and then to the public cloud. Scalable video storage solutions As storage demands have increased, video management vendors have turned to storage specialists for solutions that can accommodate large numbers of high-resolution video files, metadata associated with the footage for easy searching, along with much needed scalable solutions. In terms of video management software, this means the integration of video content from different storage types, tiers and physical locations is required, and which considers the performance profile of each storage type. With an active archive solution, video content is searchable and accessible directly by the end users regardless of where it is stored. Deploying an active archive solution enables surveillance users to reduce the complexity and costs of managing data for long term retention As seen in many product categories, camera and storage vendors continue to provide extremely competitive offerings. But, storage-specific solutions for video surveillance have lagged behind the roadmaps for video equipment and, as more and more cameras have entered the market, less attention has been placed on video storage capacities. Tiered storage strategy The surveillance industry has evolved considerably from the days of the 8mm video recorder; however, enterprise storage solutions will be forced to evolve further to cope with changing storage retention requirements. Video storage is quickly becoming one of the most expensive parts in a surveillance solution, but there is hope. Deploying an active archive solution will enable surveillance users to reduce the complexity and costs of managing from terabytes to petabytes of data for long term retention. By finding a storage solution that delivers the ability to implement a tiered storage strategy, users can adhere to regulation requirements to retain video footage and meet their safety and security objectives, while also significantly reducing storage costs and operational expenses.

Video surveillance must modernise in storage, recording and on-demand access
Video surveillance must modernise in storage, recording and on-demand access

Dollars spent by video surveillance customers must go towards ensuring high-availability capture, storage and on-demand access to live and archived video. Reaching this goal mandates high-availability of independent components – camera, network, storage (edge, external), internet connectivity, display, all Video Management Software (VMS) components and an architecture that can take advantage of this. In this note, we focus on seeing our way through to a video surveillance architecture, that provides high availability storage, access to live and stored video content. Of all options available to store recorded video, edge recording is the only one that is unaffected by network failure Edge recording Of all options available to store recorded video, edge recording is the only one that is unaffected by network failure. This makes edge storage a must-have. But, this has some limitations at present: Edge storage capacity is limited. Edge media has a short lifetime, rated only for thousands of hours of continuous recording. Most cameras are not secure and physical damage to the camera could lead to catastrophic loss of edge stored content. As storage and compression technology evolve, the constraints imposed by (1) and (2) could go away. However, securing cameras will continue to be a barrier for most installations. Secure external storage It is thus imperative to also store video in secure external storage. Such an architecture uses edge storage to fill in content gaps created by network, external storage outages. As edge storage technology improves, larger gaps can be filled in, but one will always need external storage. By our definition, ‘external storage’ is a solution stack that includes storage media and all software (including VMS) that provide access to this storage. Access to live and archived video Access to live video can either be met by external storage or directly by the camera Every surveillance solution needs to provide access to live and archived video. Access to live video can either be met by external storage or (and) directly by the camera. All things being equal, having the camera directly provide live video access, is a higher-availability solution. There is dependence on fewer components in the chain. Solutions in the market use one of the above two approaches for access to live video. Due to limited capacity and low physical security of edge storage, it makes sense at present, to have external storage meet all requests for archive video. Thus, we are led to an architecture that has heavy dependence on external storage. Dual-recording For high-availability, external storage must be architected with redundancy. Ideally, independent components that make up external storage – storage media, associated hardware and software (including VMS components), should be individually redundant and have smart interconnectivity. However, solutions in the market rigidly tie these components together. Failure of a single component causes failure of external storage. For e.g. hardware failure of a server causes VMS component failure AND storage failure. DR provides a smart way to provide high-availability for external storage For these solutions in the market, high-availability is achieved by having additional external storage units that step-in during outages of primary units. If these additional units continuously duplicate primary units, access gaps are minimised, and archive access is un-affected during primary unit outages. This is the idea behind Dual-Recording (DR).  To meet cost budgets, these additional units can be configured to store subsampled (framerate, resolution) video content. A small number of additional units can support concurrent outages of all primary units. A few-to-many redundancy. Rising need for dual-recording Most cameras cannot be physically secured, and video content produced by a camera must be stored externally. Many VMS solutions use external storage to service live video access requests. Edge storage limitations impose restrictions on edge archive access at present. So, external storage is used to service requests for archive access too. Thus, a surveillance system ends up being over-dependent on external storage. DR provides a smart way to provide high-availability for external storage. As edge storage improves, it will be able to service archive access requests. VMS software will need to evolve, to use this capability smartly.