Sony SNC-VM772R 4K IP security camera
Sony SNC-VM772R 4K IP security camera

With four times the resolution of Full HD, Sony's SNC-VM772R 4K IP security camera brings industry-leading clarity and sensitivity to critical video monitoring and surveillance applications.Thanks to the camera's large, highly sensitive 1.0-type Exmor R™ CMOS image sensor, powerful processing engine and high-quality zoom lens, the SNC-VM772R captures detail-packed 4K video footage - even in low-light conditions.The increased resolution of 4K opens up exciting new monitoring possibilities. Traditional video surveillance requires a PTZ camera or several box cameras to survey a wide area. The SNC-VM772R can stream an overall low-resolution situational view, plus up to four croppped 4K native resolution views of specific areas of interest in the scene, with Multi Tracking to chase moving subjects. The 20 megapixel imager also enables high-quality still image recording to allow close examination of a scene for evidence purposes.Picture settings are automatically selected to suit a wide range of operating environments. They can also be manually adjusted with custom profiles for even more flexible operation.The camera's outstanding image performance is enhanced with features including Optical Image Stabilisation for steadier pictures and Defog mode that cuts through haze. In addition, the excellent low-light capabilities are further enhanced with in-built IR illuminators for true night-time coverage. Quick, simple installation and set-up is aided by a smartphone or tablet PC app for remote field of view adjustment.The discreetly styled minidome camera features a ruggedised vandal- and weather-resistant design that's ideal for tough round-the-clock video security and surveillance assignments, indoors or outside.

Add to Compare
Sony launched the industry’s highest zoom HD PTZ cameras and complete the largest range of HD / Full HD cameras
Sony launched the industry’s highest zoom HD PTZ cameras and complete the largest range of HD / Full HD cameras

Sony Professional unveiled a host of new products and solutions at IFSEC 2011, continuing its commitment to developing state-of-the-art HD video security solutions and bringing the benefits of hybrid and full-IP security systems to companies of all sizes. With the launch of four new HD / Full HD pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras at IFSEC 2011, Sony will bolster its ability to offer customers a complete HD security solution, from initial image capture to playback, regardless of the recording scenario. Visitors to Sony Professional's stand will also see the latest additions to its analogue and Networked Security Recorder (NSR) offerings.As the market sees continued investment and growth in HD and megapixel solutions, with the latest IMS Research figures showing 48% of network camera revenues now come from HD and megapixel products, Sony is enhancing its video surveillance line up to meet these demands by offering a wider range of HD products from the entry level right up to the top end of the market. IFSEC 2011 will be first public showing of two new ground-breaking camera ranges - that meet the security needs of businesses across a broad range of vertical markets - alongside the other latest additions to Sony's extensive video security portfolio.Further to enhancing its HD Camera line up at IFSEC, Sony Professional will also announce additions to its range of standard definition cameras aimed at entry-level and mid-range NVR markets. Offering powerful and flexible recording options, the new NVR products will bring the option of hybrid and full-IP security solutions to smaller budgets and are ideal for small-scale monitoring applications.Explaining Sony Professional's proposition at IFSEC 2011, Yu Kitamura, European Marketing Manager, Sony Professional commented: "2010 was a milestone year for Sony Professional, setting ourselves apart as a leader in HD, supporting the industry's move from analogue to IP and continuing to develop innovative security solutions that fit a broad range of budgets and security requirements. With the launch of new camera ranges and two new NSR products we are uniquely positioned to offer market leading solutions across the entire security infrastructure and bring the benefits of HD, hybrid and full-IP solutions, to entry-level markets."Sony Professional also hosted a series of seminars and workshops throughout the show covering HD video security solutions for the retail and city surveillance market in seminar room J10 in Hall 4. See the album with captions

Add to Compare
Sony launched its new HD cameras at IFSEC
Sony launched its new HD cameras at IFSEC

What new products were on display? Over the last twelve months Sony Professional has made several significant announcements that have broadened its HD portfolio. In January this year, it added another new HD camera to the four launched in 2009. The SNC-CH240 Full HD Fixed camera was launched at Sony's Power of Images (POI) event in Germany, completing its HD range. IFSEC heralded the European launch of two new HD cameras. The SNC-DH180 and SNC-DH240 were unveiled for the first time at ISC West in the US in March and will be on show for the first time in Europe at IFSEC 2010. Focused on image quality, the SNC-DH180 boasts a built-in infrared (IR) illuminator to deliver excellent images even in absolute darkness, while the SNC-DH240 is equipped with various different image enhancers including View-DR. Why is this relevant to Sony's ongoing video security strategy? HD remains a key focus for Sony and IFSEC 2010 demonstrated Sony's understanding of the security market and the issues it faces, showing how Sony is helping customers to address these challenges. Market demand for HD products is growing but until now there has not been the breadth of products to provide the means or the motivation to move from analogue to IP. But Sony's innovation in the surveillance space is changing this. Sony maintains its commitment to providing a true hybrid offering and the solutions on display at Stand J10 in Hall 4 included Sony's hybrid video security technologies. Aiding and bridging the migration to IP, Sony demonstrated how hybrid technology is enabling more businesses to access benefits of HD without replacing their existing technology infrastructure. How is Sony developing its security offering? New technology features from Sony were also a significant focus at IFSEC. Committed to delivering superior image quality, the majority of new HD cameras from Sony have been equipped with Sony's unique View-DR Wide Dynamic Range technology, allowing users to see normally in extreme light conditions. The increased use of sound recording technology in Sony's surveillance solutions is another area of investment and new products with this capability were also on display. Sony's security product portfolio is also enhanced through the company's vertical sector expertise and consulting services. The transport sector, in particular rail businesses, has heavily adopted HD security technology. This trend is on the increase and as Sony moves into its new financial year, rail innovation was also a key highlight of the show.

Add to Compare

IP Dome cameras - Expert commentary

We need to talk about intelligent enclosure protection
We need to talk about intelligent enclosure protection

Enclosures containing electronics, communications or cabling infrastructure offer a simple attack point for cyber breaches and an opportunity for a physical attack on the hardware. Yet, many of these assets are housed within enclosures that provide minimal security features to offer a deterrent to any would-be attacker. This has always just been a pet hate. Walking down the high street of a town anywhere in the United Kingdom, you can often see open street communication cabinets. You can actually look directly inside at the equipment. And if I was a bad guy, I could quite easily just put my foot into their enclosure and quite quickly take out their infrastructure. Charged service for enclosures This seems crazy when a US$ 2 magnetic contact on a door can quickly tell you whether your enclosure is open or shut, and can be vital in keeping your network alive. Moreover, the operators of these systems, whether it is telecoms or internet providers, are providing a charged service to their customers, so they should really be protecting their enclosures. Why has that security level not been so readily taken into the outside world, into the unprotected environment? More sobering, if you contrast this security approach to the approach taken in the data centre world, an environment that already has multiple stringent security protocols in place, you get a very different picture. For instance, security devices can capture snapshots of anyone who opens a cabinet door in a data room, so it is recorded who has opened that door. While that is just one simple example, it begs the question. Why has that security level not been so readily taken into the outside world, into the unprotected environment? In my mind, a lot of it boils down simply to education. Network connection, easy point of cyber attacks Our preconceived idea about cyber security is some big corporation being knocked out or held to ransom by, again in our mind, someone sitting at a laptop, probably with their hood up over their head, typing away in the darkness, attacking us through the internet. But how the would-be criminal is going to come at us is just like in sport. They attack at the weakest point. Networks can be deployed in the outside world in many ways, such as cameras monitoring the highways. That means those locations will have a network connection. And that can be a point of attack in a non-secure outside world. Enclosures can be broken into by attackers Many people think, ‘That is okay because I’m going to take that ethernet device that my cameras are connected to and I’m going to put it inside an enclosure.’ However, what people do not realize is that the only thing that the enclosure is doing is protecting the ethernet device from Mother Nature. Because, without proper security, those enclosures can be broken into pretty easily. Many of them are just a single key that is not in any way coded to the device. Twofold cyber security People need to realise that cyber security is twofold. It can be carried out by hacking the network or physically breaking Therein lays the problem. People need to realise that cyber security is twofold. It can be carried out by hacking the network or physically breaking into the weakest physical point. And so, a simple boot through the open door of an enclosure can vandalise the devices inside and take down a small or large part of a network. And by definition, this meets the criteria for a cyber-attack. So, how do we go about tackling this problem? Well, security is a reaction marketplace. And for enclosures, there’s not, at present, a plethora of solutions out there for to counter these types of attacks. It can be challenging to find what you’re looking for through a quick Google search compared to searching for more traditional security protection measures. Deploying smart sensors and detectors But, under Vanderbilt and ComNet, we are currently taking our knowledge and experience from system installation and compiling it together. We’re bringing different products from different parts of our business to make a true solution. For instance, we have sensors for enclosures that detect anything from gas or smoke to open doors, detectors that will tell you if someone is trying to smash open your enclosure with a sledgehammer, or that someone is trying to lift your enclosure off of its mount. More importantly, as is not really a one-size-fits-all solution, we have developed a menu structure available that allows customers to pick and choose the ones that will best fit their own requirements.

We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?
We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?

While the application of facial recognition within both public and private spheres continues to draw criticism from those who see it as a threat to civil rights, this technology has become extremely commonplace in the lives of iPhone users. It is so prevalent, in fact, that by 2024 it is predicted that 90% of smartphones will use biometric facial recognition hardware. CCTV surveillance cameras  Similarly, CCTV is a well-established security measure that many of us are familiar with, whether through spotting images displayed on screens in shops, hotels and offices, or noticing cameras on the side of buildings. It is therefore necessary we ask the question of why, when facial recognition is integrated with security surveillance technology, does it become such a source of contention? It is not uncommon for concerns to be voiced against innovation. History has taught us that it is human nature to fear the unknown, especially if it seems that it may change life as we know it. Yet technology is an ever-changing, progressive part of the 21st century and it is important we start to shift the narrative away from privacy threats, to the force for good that LFR (Live Facial Recognition) represents. Live Facial Recognition (LFR) We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition Across recent weeks, we have seen pleas from UK organisations to allow better police access to facial recognition technology in order to fight crime. In the US, there are reports that LAPD is the latest police force to be properly regulating its use of facial recognition to aid criminal investigations, which is certainly a step in the right direction. While it is understandable that society fears technology that they do not yet understand, this lack of knowledge is exactly why the narrative needs to shift. We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition, we respect these anxieties. However, it is time to level the playing field of the facial recognition debate and communicate the plethora of benefits it offers society. Facial recognition technology - A force for good Facial recognition technology has already reached such a level of maturity and sophistication that there are huge opportunities for it to be leveraged as a force for good in real-world scenarios. As well as making society safer and more secure, I would go as far to say that LFR is able to save lives. One usage that could have a dramatic effect on reducing stress in people with mental conditions is the ability for facial recognition to identify those with Alzheimer’s. If an older individual is seemingly confused, lost or distressed, cameras could alert local medical centres or police stations of their identity, condition and where they need to go (a home address or a next of kin contact). Granted, this usage would be one that does incorporate a fair bit of personal data, although this information would only be gathered with consent from each individual. Vulnerable people could volunteer their personal data to local watchlists in order to ensure their safety when out in society, as well as to allow quicker resolutions of typically stressful situations. Tracking and finding missing persons Another possibility for real world positives to be drawn from facial recognition is to leverage the technology to help track or find missing persons, a lost child for instance. The most advanced forms of LFR in the market are now able to recognise individuals even if up to 50% of their face is covered and from challenging or oblique angles. Therefore, there is a significant opportunity not only to return people home safely, more quickly, but also reduce police hours spent on analysing CCTV footage. Rapid scanning of images Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match, as a more reliable and less time-consuming option than the human alternative. Freed-up officers could also then work more proactively on the ground, patrolling their local areas and increasing community safety and security twofold. It is important to understand that these facial recognition solutions should not be applied to every criminal case, and the technology must be used responsibly. However, these opportunities to use LFR as force for good are undeniable.   Debunking the myths One of the central concerns around LFR is the breach of privacy that is associated with ‘watchlists’. There is a common misconception, however, that the data of every individual that passes a camera is processed and then stored. The reality is that watch lists are compiled with focus on known criminals, while the general public can continue life as normal. The very best facial recognition will effectively view a stream of blurred faces, until it detects one that it has been programmed to recognise. For example, an individual that has previously shoplifted from a local supermarket may have their biometric data stored, so when they return to that location the employees are alerted to a risk of further crimes being committed. Considering that the cost of crime prevention to retailers in recent years has been around £1 billion, which therefore impacts consumer prices and employee wages, security measures to tackle this issue are very much in the public interest. Most importantly, the average citizen has no need to fear being ‘followed’ by LFR cameras. If data is stored, it is for a maximum of 0.6 seconds before being deleted. Privacy Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story. It is essential we spend more time and effort communicating exactly why watchlists are made, who they are made for and how they are being used, if we want to de-bunk myths and change the narrative. As science and technology professionals, heading up this exciting innovation, we must put transparency and accountability at the centre of what we do. Tony Porter, former Surveillance Camera Commissioner and current CPO at Corsight AI, has previously worked on developing processes that audit and review watch lists. Such restrictions are imperative in order for AI and LFR to be used legally, as well as ethically and responsibly. Biometrics, mask detection and contactless payments Nevertheless, the risks do not outweigh the benefits. Facial recognition should and can be used for good in so many more ways than listed above, including biometric, contactless payments, detecting whether an individual is wearing a facemask and is therefore, safe to enter a building, identifying a domestic abuse perpetrator returning to the scene of a crime and alerting police. There are even opportunities for good that we have not thought of yet. It is therefore not only a waste not to use this technology where we can, prioritising making society a safer place, it is immoral to stand by and let crimes continue while we have effective, reliable mitigation solutions.  

Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre
Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre

Urban populations are expanding rapidly around the globe, with an expected growth of 1.56 billion by 2040. As the number of people living and working in cities continues to grow, the ability to keep everyone safe is an increasing challenge. However, technology companies are developing products and solutions with these futuristic cities in mind, as the reality is closer than you may think. Solutions that can help to watch over public places and share data insights with city workers and officials are increasingly enabling smart cities to improve the experience and safety of the people who reside there. Rising scope of 5G, AI, IoT and the Cloud The main foundations that underpin smart cities are 5G, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Cloud. Each is equally important, and together, these technologies enable city officials to gather and analyse more detailed insights than ever before. For public safety in particular, having IoT and cloud systems in place will be one of the biggest factors to improving the quality of life for citizens. Smart cities have come a long way in the last few decades, but to truly make a smart city safe, real-time situational awareness and cross-agency collaboration are key areas which must be developed as a priority. Innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns. From dangerous drivers to terrorist attacks, petty crime on the streets to high profile bank robberies, innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT and cloud technologies can go some way to helping respond quickly to, and in some cases even prevent, the most serious incidents. Many existing safety systems in cities rely on aging and in some places legacy technology, such as video surveillance cameras. Many of these also use on-premises systems rather than utilising the benefits of the cloud. Smart programming to deliver greater insights These issues, though not creating a major problem today, do make it more challenging for governments and councils to update their security. Changing every camera in a city is a huge undertaking, but in turn, doing so would enable all cameras to be connected to the cloud, and provide more detailed information which can be analysed by smart programming to deliver greater insights. The physical technologies that are currently present in most urban areas lack the intelligent connectivity, interoperability and integration interfaces that smart cities need. Adopting digital technologies isn’t a luxury, but a necessity. Smart surveillance systems It enables teams to gather data from multiple sources throughout the city in real-time, and be alerted to incidents as soon as they occur. Increased connectivity and collaboration ensures that all teams that need to be aware of a situation are informed instantly. For example, a smart surveillance system can identify when a road accident has occurred. It can not only alert the nearest ambulance to attend the scene, but also the local police force to dispatch officers. An advanced system that can implement road diversions could also close roads around the incident immediately and divert traffic to other routes, keeping everyone moving and avoiding a build-up of vehicles. This is just one example: without digital systems, analysing patterns of vehicle movements to address congestion issues could be compromised, as would the ability to build real-time crime maps and deploy data analytics which make predictive policing and more effective crowd management possible. Cloud-based technologies Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation that is needed to overcome the limitations of traditional security systems. Using these, smart cities can develop a fully open systems architecture that delivers interoperation with both local and other remote open systems. The intelligence of cloud systems can not only continue to allow for greater insights as technology develops over time, but it can do so with minimal additional infrastructure investment. Smart surveillance in the real world Mexico City has a population of almost 9 million people, but if you include the whole metropolitan area, this number rises sharply to over 21 million in total, making it one of the largest cities on the planet. Seven years ago, the city first introduced its Safe City initiative, and ever since has been developing newer and smarter ways to keep its citizens safe. In particular, its cloud-based security initiative is making a huge impact. Over the past three years, Mexico City has installed 58,000 new video surveillance cameras throughout the city, in public spaces and on transport, all of which are connected to the City’s C5 (Command, Control, Computers, Communications and Citizen Contact) facility. Smart Cities operations The solution enables officers as well as the general public to upload videos via a mobile app to share information quickly, fixed, body-worn and vehicle cameras can also be integrated to provide exceptional insight into the city’s operations. The cloud-based platform can easily be upgraded to include the latest technology innovations such as licence plate reading, behavioural analysis software, video analytics and facial recognition software, which will all continue to bring down crime rates and boost response times to incidents. The right cloud approach Making the shift to cloud-based systems enables smart cities to eliminate dependence on fibre-optic connectivity and take advantage of a variety of Internet and wireless connectivity options that can significantly reduce application and communication infrastructure costs. Smart cities need to be effective in years to come, not just in the present day, or else officials have missed one of the key aspects of a truly smart city. System designers must build technology foundations now that can be easily adapted in the future to support new infrastructure as it becomes available. Open system architecture An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations For example, this could include opting for a true cloud application that can support cloud-managed local devices and automate their management. An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations and deliver additional value-add services to citizens as greater capabilities become possible in the years to come. The advances today in cloud and IoT technologies are rapid, and city officials and authorities have more options now to develop their smart cities than ever before and crucially, to use these innovations to improve public safety. New safety features Though implementing these cloud-based systems now requires investment, as new safety features are designed, there will be lower costs and challenges associated with introducing these because the basic infrastructure will already exist. Whether that’s gunshot detection or enabling the sharing of video infrastructure and data across multiple agencies in real time, smart video surveillance on cloud-based systems can bring a wealth of the new opportunities.

Latest Sony Professional Solutions Europe news

FLIR Systems releases updated Blackfly S machine vision USB3 camera with Sony’s Pregius S sensor
FLIR Systems releases updated Blackfly S machine vision USB3 camera with Sony’s Pregius S sensor

FLIR Systems, Inc. announced the availability of the new FLIR Blackfly S visible spectrum camera module, the first to integrate the Sony Pregius S IMX540 sensor with 24.5 MP at 12 FPS in a USB3 camera. The combination of the Blackfly S feature set with IMX540’s high megapixel (MP) count and fast imaging enables engineers and researchers from biomedical to semiconductor industries to inspect more in less time and with fewer cameras required. Machine vision expertise OEM machine designers, and researchers rely on FLIR for high quality, full-feature machine vision cameras" “OEM machine designers, engineers and researchers rely on FLIR for high quality, full-feature machine vision cameras,” said Paul Clayton, General Manager, Components Business at FLIR Systems. “With this latest Blackfly S model, we continue the tradition of combining the best technology with world-class support to empower our customers to achieve their objectives faster and at lower costs.” With a new backside illuminated (BSI) 2.74 µm pixel, the Pregius S sensors nearly doubles the pixel density of earlier Pregius sensors while taking advantage of lower cost and more compact lenses. Delivering 24 MP, 12 FPS Sony Pregius distortion-free imaging of fast-moving targets, the Blackfly S enables faster production lines even for very detailed inspection. High quantum efficiency The Blackfly S also delivers high quantum efficiency and low read noise allowing shorter exposure times, and therefore less powerful lights are required resulting in lower lighting costs. The FLIR Blackfly S BFS-U3-244S8M/C-C is available for purchase globally through FLIR and authorised FLIR distributors. FLIR will also release additional Pregius S sensors on GigE and 10GigE interfaces later this year. To learn more about the Sony Pregius S, visit the company’s official website.

Matrix launches 5MP IP cameras with higher resolution for better surveillance
Matrix launches 5MP IP cameras with higher resolution for better surveillance

With the continued demand for IP Video Surveillance in Small and Medium-scale Enterprises, new solutions that produce better image quality in the most challenging conditions are needed. To meet the growing needs of SMBs, Matrix has strengthened its offerings by adding 5MP IP Cameras to its existing range of 2MP and 3MP IP Cameras. Equipped with Sony STARVIS sensor with Exmor technology the 5MP IP Camera delivers a true, 104-degree Horizontal field-of-view (FOV) and exceptional low light performance in light as low as 0.01 lux. With its H.265 compression, users can reduce storage consumption by up to 30%. Available in Dome and Bullet variants, Matrix 5MP IP Cameras are ideal for both indoor and outdoor applications. Exceptional quality low light images Key Features: Better Quality Images with 5 MP Resolution Sony Starvis series Sensor with Exmor Technology for Exceptional Low Light Performance Larger Field-of-View (FOV) – 104 degrees HFOV Colour Images in Light as Low as 0.01 lux IP67 and IK10 Protection Latest H.265 Compression Technology True WDR – to Deliver Consistent Images in Varying Light Conditions “Higher resolution and detailed images enable 24*7 effective surveillance. Matrix’s existing range delivers exceptional quality low light images, and the new 5MP resolution takes it to a completely new level. Owing to the high resolution, these IP cameras provide sharper and brighter images with even more details.” said Vihar Soni, Marketing Manager, Matrix Comsec.

ONVIF reflects on 2019 activities and plans for new profile development in annual meeting
ONVIF reflects on 2019 activities and plans for new profile development in annual meeting

ONVIF, a global standardisation initiative for IP-based physical security products, held its annual membership meeting in November, providing ONVIF members with an overview of important activities of 2019 and plans for the year ahead. Attendees heard presentations on the growth of ONVIF, as well as plans for new profile development. ONVIF Chairman Per Björkdahl highlighted the forum’s achievements over the past year, particularly the market’s continued support for the profile concept, with the number of conformant products surpassing 13,000 earlier this year. With six profiles to choose from and additional ones in development, ONVIF profiles have increasingly been included in various bid and specification processes in projects around the world, making it the de-facto interface in the industry. Björkdahl also noted the continued involvement of ONVIF in the International Electrotechnical Commission’s work on international standardisation, in addition to new proposals for cloud connectivity and interoperability between multiple systems. Video Enhancement Working Group The overarching goal of ONVIF is to provide to the market a single interface through which every system can operate As is tradition, ONVIF recognised the contributions of multiple individuals from various ONVIF committees. Steve Wolf, who served on several ONVIF committees on behalf of Pelco, received the ONVIF Service Award, which acknowledges individuals who have provided a long-term commitment to the organisation. While serving on the Technical Committee, Wolf led the Security Working Group, and was also an active participant in the Video Enhancement Working Group, contributing to a number of improvements in how ONVIF approaches video. Andreas Schneider of Sony received the ONVIF Distinguished Service Award, which recognises individuals who have made significant contributions to ONVIF over many years in multiple functions. Schneider’s long-term service to the Technical Services Committee has positioned him as a major facilitator of the ONVIF organisation, with contributions to multiple ONVIF profiles. Physical access control standards “The overarching goal of ONVIF is to provide to the market a single interface through which every system can operate,” said Björkdahl. “Our honorees have shown significant and long-term commitment to our organisation, in turn making this goal a reality one profile at a time. We thank both of our recipients for their innovation, hard work and service.” ONVIF Technical Committee Chairman, Hans Busch of Bosch, spoke to members about the specification development roadmap, which highlights plans for future profile development, as well as the continued alignment to the standardisation activities within the IEC TC 79 working groups for video surveillance and physical access control standards. Specifically, Busch covered what specifications are being examined for future profiles, and how they complement and further enhance existing ONVIF profiles. IP-based physical security products ONVIF continues to work with its members to expand the number of IP interoperability solutionsAs chair of the Technical Services Committee, Sony’s Schneider gave an overview of the committee’s work on new and existing profiles, client and device test tools, updates to the conformance process and tools, and the Developers’ Plugfest. Shi-lin Chan of Axis Communications, who serves as chair of the ONVIF Communication Committee, provided a recap of ONVIF communication efforts in 2019, and discussed ONVIF’s plans for the launch of a Mandarin website later this year. Founded in 2008, ONVIF is a well-recognised industry forum driving interoperability for IP-based physical security products. The organisation has a global member base of established camera, video management system and access control companies and more than 13,000 profile conformant products. IP interoperability solutions ONVIF offers Profile S for streaming video; Profile G for recording and storage; Profile C for physical access control; Profile Q for improved out-of-the-box functionality, Profile A for broader access control configuration and Profile T for advanced streaming. ONVIF continues to work with its members to expand the number of IP interoperability solutions ONVIF conformant products can provide.

Related white papers

Security investments retailers should consider for their 2021 budget

Making sense of today’s security camera options

How to get buy-in from IT departments on IP video installations