Aasset Security announce the strengthening of the Hanwha Techwin America Electronics range of Network/IP cameras
Aasset Security announce the strengthening of the Hanwha Techwin America Electronics range of Network/IP cameras

The Samsung Electronics SCC-C6475 full function pan/tilt & zoom unit with integrated telemetry receiver and built-in compact camera, offers variable pan speeds ranging from 0.1°-180°/sec, 360° continuous pan, 400°/sec preset pan speed, variable tilt speed from 0.1°-90°/sec with 4 integrated alarm inputs & 3 alarm outputs.  The SCC-C6475 also offers: 128 programmable preset positions, camera settings programmable per position, 3 programmable pattern tours, automatic system check (data exchange), activity detection, auto homing, picture in picture with digizoom mode, 16 different telemetry protocols & 12 dynamic privacy zone masking.The built-in network server is a high-performance, dual codec, dual stream, video encoding unit.  It compresses the video signal into two MPEG or MJPEG video streams simultaneously.  In addition, it transmits the stream data out through network in realtime enabling remote monitoring and recording.  Key features1/4" WDR ExView CCD P/S 410.000 pixelsMPEG-4 & M-JPEG compression modes (max 25Fps)Network Protocols: HTTP, FTP, SMTP, TCP, UDP, IP, DHCP, DNS, ARP, NTP, PPPoE,LAN Connection 10/100base T (RJ-45)480 TVL Horizontal ResolutionSensitivity 0.7 lux Colour360° Endless PANRemote Control Interfaces RS-485, RS42222 x optical motorised zoom + 10 x digital zoom 24v Power inputThe Samsung Electronics SCC-B5395 IP Anti-Vandal Colour/Mono Mini dome camera provides clear 540 TVL resolution images by using Digital Signal Processing.  Samsung Electronics uses only the Sony Super-HAD CCD, which optimises the high frequency and horizontal correction signals.  The camera automatically detects the surrounding illumination levels in real time, and automatically switches the camera to the day or night mode, into colour in bright conditions, and into B/W mode in low light conditions, ensuring that the camera's DSP delivers the best images.  In addition, the camera uses Auto Gain Control and Sens-up (Low Speed Shutter) functions together, ensuring clear low-noise images.The SCC-B5395 IP camera is housed within a high strength polycarbonate dome cover, so that it is safe from external impact, is water resistant and dust proof.  The latest version of digital noise reduction (DNR) function is utilised to remove excess video noise that can occur in video.  The Digital Noise Reduction function of the SCC-B5395 camera uses a special Samsung computer codec to remove video & colour noise, regardless of motion thus ensuring clear, sharp images.The SCC-B5395 IP camera has a 3 way axis gimbal allowing easy rotation of up to 355° horizontally and up to 90° vertically.  Allowing for installations in difficult areas such as walls or other inclined surfaces.  The camera also uses horizontal and vertical mirroring functions to provide correct images regardless of the installation environment. Key featuresVandal Resistant Fixed Dome (IP66 rated)Video motion detection and pre/post-alarm bufferMPEG-4 & M-JPEG compression modes (max. 25 fps)Easy Network Setup such as UPnP function, DDNSDay/Night feature with movable IR cut filterVarifocal Lens: f = 2.9 - 10 mm, auto irisPower Input AC24V/DC12V and PoEThe Samsung Electronics SNC-B2315P day/night IP camera series incorporates the 1/3" 470,000 pixels CCD automatically switching to colour mode or black and white (B/W) mode at night, moving filter technology.  It employs the SONY CCD and utilizes a superior Digital Signal Process to supply sharp images of the highest resolution.  The SCC-B2315 is capable of providing outstanding colour images and clear images in B/W mode even in low level illumination.  The SNC-B2315 camera utilises the low light function and incorporates an AGC feature with low-speed shutter, so that along with the Day/Night function, it can present clear images even in difficult lighting conditions such as dimly lit parking lots or building interiors.The BLC (Back Light Compensation) function ensures perfect backlight compensation effect every time by allowing the user to setup five preset zones / positions or sizes for an object darkened by backlighting.  The SNC-B2315 also has a basic Motion Detection function, a Camera ID indication function that indicates the camera ID of up to 20 digits and a Digital 10x zooming functionKey features540/570 TVL Horizontal ResolutionMPEG-4 & M-JPEG compression modes (max. 25 fps)Easy Network Setup such as UPnP function, DDNSPrivacy ZonesVideo motion detection and pre/post-alarm bufferAccepts 2 types of auto iris lenses (DC/Video)WDR function, Day/Night function with movable IR cut filterPower Input AC24V/DC12V and PoE

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IP Dome cameras - Expert commentary

We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?
We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?

While the application of facial recognition within both public and private spheres continues to draw criticism from those who see it as a threat to civil rights, this technology has become extremely commonplace in the lives of iPhone users. It is so prevalent, in fact, that by 2024 it is predicted that 90% of smartphones will use biometric facial recognition hardware. CCTV surveillance cameras  Similarly, CCTV is a well-established security measure that many of us are familiar with, whether through spotting images displayed on screens in shops, hotels and offices, or noticing cameras on the side of buildings. It is therefore necessary we ask the question of why, when facial recognition is integrated with security surveillance technology, does it become such a source of contention? It is not uncommon for concerns to be voiced against innovation. History has taught us that it is human nature to fear the unknown, especially if it seems that it may change life as we know it. Yet technology is an ever-changing, progressive part of the 21st century and it is important we start to shift the narrative away from privacy threats, to the force for good that LFR (Live Facial Recognition) represents. Live Facial Recognition (LFR) We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition Across recent weeks, we have seen pleas from UK organisations to allow better police access to facial recognition technology in order to fight crime. In the US, there are reports that LAPD is the latest police force to be properly regulating its use of facial recognition to aid criminal investigations, which is certainly a step in the right direction. While it is understandable that society fears technology that they do not yet understand, this lack of knowledge is exactly why the narrative needs to shift. We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition, we respect these anxieties. However, it is time to level the playing field of the facial recognition debate and communicate the plethora of benefits it offers society. Facial recognition technology - A force for good Facial recognition technology has already reached such a level of maturity and sophistication that there are huge opportunities for it to be leveraged as a force for good in real-world scenarios. As well as making society safer and more secure, I would go as far to say that LFR is able to save lives. One usage that could have a dramatic effect on reducing stress in people with mental conditions is the ability for facial recognition to identify those with Alzheimer’s. If an older individual is seemingly confused, lost or distressed, cameras could alert local medical centres or police stations of their identity, condition and where they need to go (a home address or a next of kin contact). Granted, this usage would be one that does incorporate a fair bit of personal data, although this information would only be gathered with consent from each individual. Vulnerable people could volunteer their personal data to local watchlists in order to ensure their safety when out in society, as well as to allow quicker resolutions of typically stressful situations. Tracking and finding missing persons Another possibility for real world positives to be drawn from facial recognition is to leverage the technology to help track or find missing persons, a lost child for instance. The most advanced forms of LFR in the market are now able to recognise individuals even if up to 50% of their face is covered and from challenging or oblique angles. Therefore, there is a significant opportunity not only to return people home safely, more quickly, but also reduce police hours spent on analysing CCTV footage. Rapid scanning of images Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match, as a more reliable and less time-consuming option than the human alternative. Freed-up officers could also then work more proactively on the ground, patrolling their local areas and increasing community safety and security twofold. It is important to understand that these facial recognition solutions should not be applied to every criminal case, and the technology must be used responsibly. However, these opportunities to use LFR as force for good are undeniable.   Debunking the myths One of the central concerns around LFR is the breach of privacy that is associated with ‘watchlists’. There is a common misconception, however, that the data of every individual that passes a camera is processed and then stored. The reality is that watch lists are compiled with focus on known criminals, while the general public can continue life as normal. The very best facial recognition will effectively view a stream of blurred faces, until it detects one that it has been programmed to recognise. For example, an individual that has previously shoplifted from a local supermarket may have their biometric data stored, so when they return to that location the employees are alerted to a risk of further crimes being committed. Considering that the cost of crime prevention to retailers in recent years has been around £1 billion, which therefore impacts consumer prices and employee wages, security measures to tackle this issue are very much in the public interest. Most importantly, the average citizen has no need to fear being ‘followed’ by LFR cameras. If data is stored, it is for a maximum of 0.6 seconds before being deleted. Privacy Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story. It is essential we spend more time and effort communicating exactly why watchlists are made, who they are made for and how they are being used, if we want to de-bunk myths and change the narrative. As science and technology professionals, heading up this exciting innovation, we must put transparency and accountability at the centre of what we do. Tony Porter, former Surveillance Camera Commissioner and current CPO at Corsight AI, has previously worked on developing processes that audit and review watch lists. Such restrictions are imperative in order for AI and LFR to be used legally, as well as ethically and responsibly. Biometrics, mask detection and contactless payments Nevertheless, the risks do not outweigh the benefits. Facial recognition should and can be used for good in so many more ways than listed above, including biometric, contactless payments, detecting whether an individual is wearing a facemask and is therefore, safe to enter a building, identifying a domestic abuse perpetrator returning to the scene of a crime and alerting police. There are even opportunities for good that we have not thought of yet. It is therefore not only a waste not to use this technology where we can, prioritising making society a safer place, it is immoral to stand by and let crimes continue while we have effective, reliable mitigation solutions.  

Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre
Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre

Urban populations are expanding rapidly around the globe, with an expected growth of 1.56 billion by 2040. As the number of people living and working in cities continues to grow, the ability to keep everyone safe is an increasing challenge. However, technology companies are developing products and solutions with these futuristic cities in mind, as the reality is closer than you may think. Solutions that can help to watch over public places and share data insights with city workers and officials are increasingly enabling smart cities to improve the experience and safety of the people who reside there. Rising scope of 5G, AI, IoT and the Cloud The main foundations that underpin smart cities are 5G, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Cloud. Each is equally important, and together, these technologies enable city officials to gather and analyse more detailed insights than ever before. For public safety in particular, having IoT and cloud systems in place will be one of the biggest factors to improving the quality of life for citizens. Smart cities have come a long way in the last few decades, but to truly make a smart city safe, real-time situational awareness and cross-agency collaboration are key areas which must be developed as a priority. Innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns. From dangerous drivers to terrorist attacks, petty crime on the streets to high profile bank robberies, innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT and cloud technologies can go some way to helping respond quickly to, and in some cases even prevent, the most serious incidents. Many existing safety systems in cities rely on aging and in some places legacy technology, such as video surveillance cameras. Many of these also use on-premises systems rather than utilising the benefits of the cloud. Smart programming to deliver greater insights These issues, though not creating a major problem today, do make it more challenging for governments and councils to update their security. Changing every camera in a city is a huge undertaking, but in turn, doing so would enable all cameras to be connected to the cloud, and provide more detailed information which can be analysed by smart programming to deliver greater insights. The physical technologies that are currently present in most urban areas lack the intelligent connectivity, interoperability and integration interfaces that smart cities need. Adopting digital technologies isn’t a luxury, but a necessity. Smart surveillance systems It enables teams to gather data from multiple sources throughout the city in real-time, and be alerted to incidents as soon as they occur. Increased connectivity and collaboration ensures that all teams that need to be aware of a situation are informed instantly. For example, a smart surveillance system can identify when a road accident has occurred. It can not only alert the nearest ambulance to attend the scene, but also the local police force to dispatch officers. An advanced system that can implement road diversions could also close roads around the incident immediately and divert traffic to other routes, keeping everyone moving and avoiding a build-up of vehicles. This is just one example: without digital systems, analysing patterns of vehicle movements to address congestion issues could be compromised, as would the ability to build real-time crime maps and deploy data analytics which make predictive policing and more effective crowd management possible. Cloud-based technologies Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation that is needed to overcome the limitations of traditional security systems. Using these, smart cities can develop a fully open systems architecture that delivers interoperation with both local and other remote open systems. The intelligence of cloud systems can not only continue to allow for greater insights as technology develops over time, but it can do so with minimal additional infrastructure investment. Smart surveillance in the real world Mexico City has a population of almost 9 million people, but if you include the whole metropolitan area, this number rises sharply to over 21 million in total, making it one of the largest cities on the planet. Seven years ago, the city first introduced its Safe City initiative, and ever since has been developing newer and smarter ways to keep its citizens safe. In particular, its cloud-based security initiative is making a huge impact. Over the past three years, Mexico City has installed 58,000 new video surveillance cameras throughout the city, in public spaces and on transport, all of which are connected to the City’s C5 (Command, Control, Computers, Communications and Citizen Contact) facility. Smart Cities operations The solution enables officers as well as the general public to upload videos via a mobile app to share information quickly, fixed, body-worn and vehicle cameras can also be integrated to provide exceptional insight into the city’s operations. The cloud-based platform can easily be upgraded to include the latest technology innovations such as licence plate reading, behavioural analysis software, video analytics and facial recognition software, which will all continue to bring down crime rates and boost response times to incidents. The right cloud approach Making the shift to cloud-based systems enables smart cities to eliminate dependence on fibre-optic connectivity and take advantage of a variety of Internet and wireless connectivity options that can significantly reduce application and communication infrastructure costs. Smart cities need to be effective in years to come, not just in the present day, or else officials have missed one of the key aspects of a truly smart city. System designers must build technology foundations now that can be easily adapted in the future to support new infrastructure as it becomes available. Open system architecture An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations For example, this could include opting for a true cloud application that can support cloud-managed local devices and automate their management. An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations and deliver additional value-add services to citizens as greater capabilities become possible in the years to come. The advances today in cloud and IoT technologies are rapid, and city officials and authorities have more options now to develop their smart cities than ever before and crucially, to use these innovations to improve public safety. New safety features Though implementing these cloud-based systems now requires investment, as new safety features are designed, there will be lower costs and challenges associated with introducing these because the basic infrastructure will already exist. Whether that’s gunshot detection or enabling the sharing of video infrastructure and data across multiple agencies in real time, smart video surveillance on cloud-based systems can bring a wealth of the new opportunities.

Biometrics provides industries with security, access control, and data protection
Biometrics provides industries with security, access control, and data protection

Several major players vigorously employ biometric recognition technologies around the globe. Governments use biometrics to control immigration, security, and create national databases of biometric profiles. Being one of the most striking examples, the Indian Aadhaar includes face photos, iris, and fingerprints of about 1.2 billion people. Financial institutions, on their part, make use of biometrics to protect transactions by confirming a client's identity, as well as develop and provide services without clients visiting the office. Besides, biometric technology ensures security and optimises passenger traffic at transport facilities and collects data about customers, and investigates theft and other incidents in retail stores. Widespread use of biometrics Business, which suddenly boosted the development of biometrics, is an active user of biometric technology Business, which suddenly boosted the development of biometrics, is another active user of biometric technology. Industries choose biometric systems, as these systems are impossible to trick in terms of security, access control, and data protection. Being in demand in business, these three tasks are also relevant for the industry. However, the use of biometrics at industrial sites is discussed unfairly seldom. Therefore, it is the face identification that is the most convenient there, as workers often use gloves, or their hands may be contaminated, and the palm pattern is distorted by heavy labour. All these features make it difficult to recognise people by fingerprints or veins and significantly reduce identification reliability. Therefore, industries seek facial recognition solutions. Thus, let us demonstrate the application of face recognition technology at different enterprises, regardless of the area. Facial recognition use in incident management Facial biometric products are known to automate and improve the efficiency of security services by enriching any VMS system. These systems provide an opportunity of instantly informing the operator about recognised or unrecognised people, and their list membership, as well as save all the detected images for further security incident investigation. Furthermore, some sophisticated facial biometric systems even provide an opportunity to build a map of the movements of specific people around a site. Besides, it is relevant not only for conducting investigations but also in countering the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Identifying and tracking COVID-19 positive cases Therefore, if an employee or visitor with a positive COVID-19 test enters a facility, the system will help to track his/her movement and identify his/her specific location. It will also help to take the necessary measures for spot sanitary processing. Thus, the introduction of biometric facial recognition at the industrial enterprise can improve and speed up the incidents’ response and investigations without spending hours watching the video archive. Access control system to secure physical assets The right access control system can help industries secure physical and informational assets The right access control system can help industries secure physical and informational assets, cut personnel costs, and keep employees safe. Facial recognition systems may enrich access control systems of any company by providing more security. As biometric characteristics, by which the system assesses the compliance of a person with the available profiles in the database, cannot be faked or passed. The human factor is also reduced to zero, due to the fact that while identity documents can be changed, the inspector can make a mistake or treat his/her task carelessly, be in collusion with an intruder, the biometric system simply compares a person in front of the camera with the biometric profiles database. Biometric facial identification software For example, RecFaces product Id-Gate, a specialised software product for reliable access control to the site, checks the access rights by using biometric facial identification alone or in conjunction with traditional IDs (electronic passes, access keys, etc.), which means that there is almost a zero probability of passing to the site by someone else's ID. The access control system’s functionality allows one to strictly account the number and time of all the facility’s visitors and also track their movement. When unauthorised access is attempted or a person from the stop list is detected, Id-Gate sends an automatic notification to the access control system and operator. Enhanced data and information security Even despite the division of access to different industrial enterprise areas, the security service needs to provide independent information system security. Employees with the same facility access rights may have different access rights to data. However, in that case, a personal password is not enough, as an employee may forget it, write it down and leave it as a reminder, tell a colleague to do something for him/her during the vacation, or just enter it at another person’s presence. Password-free biometric authentication systems make the procedure user-friendly and secure Password-free biometric authentication Password-free biometric authentication systems make the procedure user-friendly and secure. Such systems usually provide an option of two-step verification when successful password entry is additionally confirmed by biometric recognition. Hence, it is particularly relevant due to the current lockdown in many countries. To sum up, the application of biometric technologies solves several issues of the industry, such as: Optimises and partially automates the work of the security service, as it provides reliable identification and verification of visitors/employees, reduces the amount of time spent on finding a person on video and making a map of his/her movements, without spending hours on watching video archive in case of investigation. Provides a high level of reliability and protection from unauthorised access to the enterprise and the information system. Provides a two-step verification of the user/visitor (including password and biometric data) and almost eliminates the risk of substitution of user data/ID.

Latest Hanwha Techwin Europe news

Hanwha Techwin announces its Wisenet Network Video Recorders are now supported by Seagate high-density hard disk drives
Hanwha Techwin announces its Wisenet Network Video Recorders are now supported by Seagate high-density hard disk drives

Hanwha Techwin has announced consultants, system designers and system integrators are now able to specify Wisenet Q series and Wisenet WAVE PoE NVRs supplied with Seagate hard disk drives (HDDs). High-density HDDs “Seagate’s space-efficient, high-density HDDs (hard disk drives) are able to perfectly meet the data storage demands of video surveillance systems and equally important, they have a reputation for being ultra-reliable,” said Uri Guterman, Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. Uri Guterman adds, “Our decision to collaborate with Seagate Technology will therefore enhance the ability of these Wisenet NVRs (Network Video Recorders) to robustly fulfill the requirements of virtually any video surveillance applications, other than those, which require a server-based storage solution.”  Wisenet Q and WAVE PoE NVRs Wisenet WAVE PoE NVRs provide a cost-effective way of utilising the Wisenet WAVE VMS Wisenet WAVE PoE NVRs provide a cost-effective, seamlessly integrated and optimised way of utilising the latest version of the feature-rich Wisenet WAVE video management software (VMS), without having to install a server. Wisenet Q PoE NVRs are designed to be suitable for virtually any small to medium size video surveillance applications, which require a cost-effective, robust and reliable video recording and storage solution. Retail and corporate applications As such, they are ideal for budget limited office, retail and warehouse type applications that do not need a high number of cameras, but where users wish to have the ability to record high-definition images.

Hanwha Techwin expands Wisenet X PTZ PLUS range of cameras equipped with AI object tracking
Hanwha Techwin expands Wisenet X PTZ PLUS range of cameras equipped with AI object tracking

The six new cameras added to the Wisenet X PTZ PLUS range have been developed by Hanwha Techwin to enable users to capture evidence grade images of activity occurring in large open area applications. The ability of the new 2MP, 6MP and 4K Wisenet X PTZ PLUS cameras to operate effectively in environments such as airports, car parks, industrial estates, stadia and city centres, is enhanced by a long list of technically advanced features, which include AI-based object tracking, precise PTZ control and improved pre-set accuracy. The cameras, which have a lightweight, compact form factor, are also able to capture high-quality images of objects up to a distance of 200 metres regardless of the lighting conditions, with the help of adaptive IR technology which adjusts the angle of the camera’s IR LEDs to match the level of zoom. AI auto-tracking Operators can programme a camera to lock onto and auto-track a specific object with the help of deep learning video analytics An AI auto-tracking feature allows control room operators to efficiently monitor the movement of objects while remaining hands-free to control other cameras. With a right-click of a mouse, operators can programme a camera to lock onto and auto-track a specific object. It does so with the help of deep learning video analytics which detects and classifies people and vehicles. The video analytics is supported by AI algorithms unique to Hanwha Techwin. Alternatively, operators can take advantage of highly accurate manual control PTZ functionality to zoom in to see close up detail of target objects and track their movement. Other key features and functions Pre-set Accuracy: During their life cycle, most PTZ cameras are likely to be expected to ‘pan and tilt’ many thousands of times and it is not unknown for positioning errors to occur. Wisenet PTZ PLUS cameras, which have a pre-set accuracy of ±0.1˚, are able to detect if they are not precisely aimed at the specified field of view and will move within one second to the correct position. Focus Save: Applied to up to 32 pre-defined areas, focus save functionality ensures that regardless of the lighting conditions, a camera is able to rapidly come into focus when it is moved to a new position. Tilt Range: The cameras’ extended tilt range of up to 110⁰ allows any objects positioned above the cameras to be seen. Wisenet7 chipset At the heart of all Wisenet X PTZ PLUS cameras is Wisenet7, Hanwha Techwin’s most powerful chipset to date, which with extreme’ Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) functionality that utilises Local Contrast Enhancement and Scene Analysis technologies, is able to facilitate the capture of ultra-clear images from scenes containing a challenging mix of bright and dark areas. Excellent low light performance is also assured thanks to the utilisation of 3D noise reduction technology which, while minimising motion blur, uses several filters to isolate and remove pixels that are causing noise, while a new noise reduction algorithm improves the edge and colour of objects. Cyber secure Wisenet7 chipset incorporates a list of technologies that significantly enhance the cyber security credentials Complying with UL CAP and Secure by Default standards, the Wisenet7 chipset also incorporates an impressive list of ground-breaking technologies that significantly enhance the cyber security credentials of the Wisenet PTZ PLUS cameras. They also benefit from a Hanwha Techwin proprietary device certificate issuing system which embeds unique certificates into Wisenet products during both the development phase and manufacturing process. This further enhances the camera’s ability to prevent hackers from tampering with its firmware. Installer friendly Compact and approximately 65% lighter than most PTZ domes, the camera-mount installed Wisenet X PTZ PLUS cameras can be quickly and easily deployed, requiring engineers during a first fix to just ‘match 3 points and twist’. This conveniently enables them to tighten screws without having to hold onto the camera. Unlike conventional PTZ cameras which require up to 5 separate cables, the Wisenet X PTZ PLUS cameras only need a single RJ45 cable to operate and this is installed with a flexible bush to ensure the camera is waterproof. The new Wisenet PTZ PLUS cameras are as follows: Wisenet XNP-9250: 4K 25x PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-9250R: 4K 25x IR PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-8250: 6MP 25x PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-8250R: 6MP 25x IR PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-6400: 2MP 40x PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-6400R: 2MP 40x IR PTZ camera Authority comments “Our comprehensive Wisenet camera line-up offers a variety of options for monitoring wide open areas. However, I would encourage consultants, system designers and system integrators to take a close look at our PTZ PLUS range when there is a need to closely monitor and automatically track moving people or vehicles,” said Uri Guterman, Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. “Our design, development and manufacturing teams have combined their expertise to pack these cameras with a long list of practical features and innovative technology which collectively will surely meet, if not exceed, users’ expectations.”

Hanwha adds Wisenet PNM-9022V and Wisenet PNM-9322VQP to their range of multi-directional cameras
Hanwha adds Wisenet PNM-9022V and Wisenet PNM-9322VQP to their range of multi-directional cameras

Two new Wisenet cameras equipped with Hanwha Techwin’s ground-breaking Wisenet7 chipset have reinforced the company’s claim to be the manufacturer of multi-directional cameras.  The 4-channel PNM-9022V utilises alpha blending technology to stitch the overlapping images captured by its four Full HD sensors into a seamless 8.3-megapixel 209° image, thus ensuring an operator never loses sight of a person or vehicle moving across a wide area. Digital PTZ functionality Superseding the highly successful Wisenet PNM-9020V, the PNM-9022V can also be used to capture 180° images, with operators able to take advantage of digital PTZ functionality across two of the camera’s channels. With Wisenet7 SoC, Hanwha Techwin’s most powerful chipset to date, at its heart, the PNM-9022V’s 4 sensors, which come with 2.8mm fixed focal lenses, are able to capture high definition colour images when the lighting level is as low as 0.03 Lux. Wisenet7 also features Hanwha Techwin proprietary ‘extreme’ Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) technology which, performing at up to 120dB, utilises new Local Contrast Enhancement and Scene Analysis technologies to enable the camera to capture ultra-clear images from scenes containing a challenging mix of bright and dark areas. Certificate issuing system Lens Distortion Correction (LDC) technology utilised by the PNM-9022V corrects the distortion created Lens Distortion Correction (LDC) technology utilised by the PNM-9022V corrects the distortion created through the use of wide-angle lenses. This delivers images which more closely resemble what is seen through the human eye. As part of the fast-growing number of new cameras which incorporate the UL CAP certificated Wisenet7 chipset, the National Defence Authorization Act (NDAA) compliant PNM-9022V is packed with an impressive list of technologies to protect it from cyber-attacks. It also benefits from a Hanwha Techwin proprietary device certificate issuing system, which embeds unique certificates into Wisenet7 products during both the development phase and manufacturing process. This further enhances the camera’s ability to prevent hackers from tampering with its firmware. Cable connection purposes 2 Micro SD/SDHC/SDXC slots enable up to 1TB of video or data to be stored at the edge should there be disruption to the network. Video of any incidents, which potentially might have been lost on the recorder side, can therefore be retrieved from the camera when the network connection has been restored. Minimising the time needed to be spent on site, the PNM-9022V has a hinged backplate to provide easy access for cable connection purposes. Installers have to simply install the back plate, clip the camera in place and tighten two screws. Intelligent video analytics Other key features include the following: A suite of built-in Intelligent Video Analytics (IVA), which includes audio detection, defocus detection, directional detection, enter/exit, appear/disappear, motion detection, virtual line and camera tampering detection. Heatmap video analytics which provides business intelligence on customer density and buying behaviour. Support for WiseStream II complementary compression technology, as well as H.265, H.264 and MJPEG compression formats. Bandwidth efficiency is improved by up to 75% compared to current H.264 technology, when WiseStream II is combined with H.265 compression. PoE+ which negates the need to install a power supply and separate cabling for the camera. IP66, IK10 and NEMA4X rated for protection against water, dust and mechanical impact. Cost-effective solution Coinciding with the launch of the PNM-9022V, the PNM-9322VQP with 4 sensors and an integral PTZ camera, is designed to provide a highly cost-effective solution for detecting and tracking objects over wide open areas. The option of exchangeable 2 and 5-megapixel lens modules enables the camera’s sensors to work together to seamlessly capture 360° images of up to 20-megapixel resolution. In addition, the device’s PTZ camera element can be configured to zoom in and track a moving object or move to a user defined preset position when the line crossing detection function of the multi-directional camera detects activity. It is also able to ‘hand-over’ to cameras covering adjacent areas to ensure operators can continue to observe people or vehicles as they move out of its field of view. Providing audio support The NDAA compliant PNM-9322VQP supersedes the highly successful PNM-9320VQP Equipped with the Wisenet7 chipset, the NDAA compliant PNM-9322VQP supersedes the highly successful PNM-9320VQP, with the additional benefit of providing audio support. “These two new models perfectly complement our other existing 2, 3, 4 and 5-channel multi-sensor cameras which collectively enable us to offer customers an affordable multi-directional camera solution for virtually any video surveillance project,” said Uri Guterman, Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. Providing significant savings “All of these cameras will help users achieve a high return on investment (ROI) as they can perform the role of a greater number of standard HD cameras. In doing so, they provide significant savings on camera purchasing costs and with less cable, conduit, mounting hardware and network switches required, installation costs are reduced as well. With only a single IP connection, they also only require one VMS licence.” “The value of these two new cameras being NDAA compliant and UL CAP certificated should also not be underestimated. System integrators will quite often find that both can be a key requirement when they are submitting tenders for projects involving end-users which operate multi-nationally.”

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