The future is clear
The future is clear

A step ahead of the gameSiqura knows video surveillance and it knows what you need for a successful system. That's why the Siqura 6x series cameras incorporate everything you need to be ready for the future. This new camera line offers all the latest technologies to ensure a long-lasting and state-of-the-art system anytime, anywhere.Fruitful foresightsThe traditional box-shaped BC6x cameras and the vandal-proof fixed-dome FD6x cameras provide HD and Full HD resolution images in both H.264 or MPEG-4 and MJPEG. With the option to configure multiple combinations of resolution and frame rate, it is possible to satisfy a variety of different live-viewing and recording scenarios, making them ideal for large professional installations where high resolutions and quality images are needed.The Siqura 6x cameras also offer an IR cut filter and backlight compensation as standard features. The BC6x series includes wide dynamic range (WDR) functionality to ensure quality images in difficult lighting conditions. Since surveillance solutions need to be flexible when it comes to installation, these new cameras offer AC, DC, or Power over Ethernet (PoE) powering options. Through an intuitive and straightforward Web interface, users can configure privacy masks ensure the security and integrity of the surveillance system.HD, Full HDHigh-definition (HD) image resolutions are without a doubt a solid step up from their standard-definition (SD) and analogue predecessors. A 16x9 aspect ratio significantly widens the scope of a camera's field of view, ultimately reducing the number of cameras needed for a given application. Both HD (720p) and Full HD (1080p) considerably intensify the number of available pixels, providing camera images with more detail than ever before. This makes CCTV systems capable of ascertaining and identifying information caught on video that would otherwise be too vague or pixelated to interpret accurately. The Siqura 6x camera series use progressive scanning. This not only simplifies the transmission of video by doing away with the need for de-interlacing but it also improves video quality by sending complete frames rather than segmented parts.Extensive integrationONVIF is a non-profit organisation dedicated to the development of industry-wide standards for IP-based physical security devices. Since the Siqura 6x series cameras comply with ONVIF specifications, they are already integrated into major video management systems (VMS), such as PVis (Schille Informationssysteme GmbH), XProtect (Milestone), Omnicast (Genetec), SkyPoint (Lenel), and many others. This makes it easy to incorporate a Siqura 6x camera into any network.Conserving bandwidth through improving qualityH.264 is the newest video compression standard, succeeding the well-known MPEG-4 and MPEG-2. It currently offers the best image quality available while at the same time reducing bandwidth requirements. The Siqura 6x series cameras proficiently balance the intensified processing power requirements inherent in H.264 compression with network limitations. As a result, the Siqura 6x cameras are able to efficiently offer H.264 streams at HD and Full HD systems while using relatively little bandwidth.CCD/CMOSThe Siqura 6x cameras offer either a CCD or CMOS image sensor, both of which effectively take light signals and turn them into electrical signals for encoding and transmission. The CCD sensor performs exceptionally well in dim conditions while the CMOS image sensor is capable of offering Full HD (1080p).HybridWith either an optional analogue or IP output connector, the Siqura 6x cameras can adapt as your system expands and develops. Quality and reliabilityThe Siqura 6x cameras are part of the Siqura product line, an extensive collection of video surveillance equipment offering complete solutions and reputed for quality and reliability.The Siqura 6x series will be commercially released in September 2010. For more information, visit this site http://www.siqura.com.

Add to Compare
See at a glance what your video streaming solution can do with ONVIF Profile S
See at a glance what your video streaming solution can do with ONVIF Profile S

As a contributing member and strong supporter of ONVIF, TKH Security Solutions has successfully implemented ONVIF Profile S in its Siqura IP cameras and video encoders, thereby simplifying their effective incorporation into third-party systems. Profile S comprises all the streaming requirements across each ONVIF version point and is the first in a series of profiles that enable users to more easily determine the compatibility of ONVIF-compliant equipment. Seamless integration guaranteed By ensuring its Siqura solutions conform to ONVIF Profile S, TKH Security Solutions guarantees that its Siqura IP devices integrate seamlessly with third-party products that comply with the ONVIF Profile S specification. Siqura cameras and codecs now support video streaming, PTZ control, audio streaming, NTP, and relay outputs according to the ONVIF standard. This offers customers the ability to select the products that best suit their specific project requirements. Stricter requirements for ONVIF compliancy The ONVIF standard has a number of different versions that contain various features. Since the features required to integrate a system for a particular purpose are not necessarily part of the same version, ONVIF reorganized its version specifications into profiles, each of which covers a specific task; for example, Profile S contains streaming requirements while Profile G and Profile C cover the storage and access control features, respectively. The ONVIF test tool has also been adjusted to more accurately certify products that are compliant with a certain profile. Profile S sets strict guidelines for the common components that are shared by ONVIF-compliant devices (e.g., cameras and codecs) and client programs (e.g., management software). It defines how these products must send, configure, request, or control media streaming over an IP network. Ultimately, this facilitates the efforts of manufacturers, systems integrators, and users to more effectively streamline and implement integrated systems based on open standards. View a complete list of Profile S-conformant Siqura productsFor more information about ONVIF, please see the ONVIF white paper from TKH Security Solutions 

Add to Compare

IP cameras - Expert commentary

Why visualisation platforms are vital for an effective Security Operation Centre (SOC)
Why visualisation platforms are vital for an effective Security Operation Centre (SOC)

Display solutions play a key role in SOCs in providing the screens needed for individuals and teams to visualise and share the multiple data sources needed in an SOC today. Security Operation Centre (SOC) Every SOC has multiple sources and inputs, both physical and virtual, all of which provide numerous data points to operators, in order to provide the highest levels of physical and cyber security, including surveillance camera feeds, access control and alarm systems for physical security, as well as dashboards and web apps for cyber security applications. Today’s advancements in technology and computing power not only have increasingly made security systems much more scalable, by adding hundreds, if not thousands, of more data points to an SOC, but the rate at which the data comes in has significantly increased as well. Accurate monitoring and surveillance This has made monitoring and surveillance much more accurate and effective, but also more challenging for operators, as they can’t realistically monitor the hundreds, even thousands of cameras, dashboards, calls, etc. in a reactive manner. Lacking situational awareness is often one of the primary factors in poor decision making In order for operators in SOC’s to be able to mitigate incidents in a less reactive way and take meaningful action, streamlined actionable data is needed. This is what will ensure operators in SOC truly have situational awareness. Situational awareness is a key foundation of effective decision making. In its simplest form, ‘It is knowing what is going on’. Lacking situational awareness is often one of the primary factors in poor decision making and in accidents attributed to human error. Achieving ‘true’ situational awareness Situational awareness isn’t just what has already happened, but what is likely to happen next and to achieve ‘true’ situational awareness, a combination of actionable data and the ability to deliver that information or data to the right people, at the right time. This is where visualisation platforms (known as visual networking platforms) that provide both the situational real estate, as well as support for computer vision and AI, can help SOCs achieve true situational awareness Role of computer vision and AI technologies Proactive situational awareness is when the data coming into the SOC is analysed in real time and then, brought forward to operators who are decision makers and key stakeholders in near real time for actionable visualisation. Computer vision is a field of Artificial Intelligence that trains computers to interpret and understand digital images and videos. It is a way to automate tasks that the human visual system can also carry out, the automatic extraction, analysis and understanding of useful information from a single image or a sequence of images. There are numerous potential value adds that computer vision can provide to operation centres of different kinds. Here are some examples: Face Recognition: Face detection algorithms can be applied to filter and identify an individual. Biometric Systems: AI can be applied to biometric descriptions such as fingerprint, iris, and face matching. Surveillance: Computer vision supports IoT cameras used to monitor activities and movements of just about any kind that might be related to security and safety, whether that's on the job safety or physical security. Smart Cities: AI and computer vision can be used to improve mobility through quantitative, objective and automated management of resource use (car parks, roads, public squares, etc.) based on the analysis of CCTV data. Event Recognition: Improve the visualisation and the decision-making process of human operators or existing video surveillance solutions, by integrating real-time video data analysis algorithms to understand the content of the filmed scene and to extract the relevant information from it. Monitoring: Responding to specific tasks in terms of continuous monitoring and surveillance in many different application frameworks: improved management of logistics in storage warehouses, counting of people during event gatherings, monitoring of subway stations, coastal areas, etc. Computer Vision applications When considering a Computer Vision application, it’s important to ensure that the rest of the infrastructure in the Operation Centre, for example the solution that drives the displays and video walls, will connect and work well with the computer vision application. The best way to do this of course is to use a software-driven approach to displaying information and data, rather than a traditional AV hardware approach, which may present incompatibilities. Software-defined and open technology solutions Software-defined and open technology solutions provide a wider support for any type of application the SOC may need Software-defined and open technology solutions provide a wider support for any type of application the SOC may need, including computer vision. In the modern world, with everything going digital, all security services and applications have become networked, and as such, they belong to IT. AV applications and services have increasingly become an integral part of an organisation’s IT infrastructure. Software-defined approach to AV IT teams responsible for data protection are more in favour of a software-defined approach to AV that allow virtualised, open technologies as opposed to traditional hardware-based solutions. Software’s flexibility allows for more efficient refreshment cycles, expansions and upgrades. The rise of AV-over-IP technologies have enabled IT teams in SOC’s to effectively integrate AV solutions into their existing stack, greatly reducing overhead costs, when it comes to technology investments, staff training, maintenance, and even physical infrastructure. AV-over-IP software platforms Moreover, with AV-over-IP, software-defined AV platforms, IT teams can more easily integrate AI and Computer Vision applications within the SOC, and have better control of the data coming in, while achieving true situational awareness. Situational awareness is all about actionable data delivered to the right people, at the right time, in order to address security incidents and challenges. Situational awareness is all about actionable data delivered to the right people Often, the people who need to know about security risks or breaches are not physically present in the operation centres, so having the data and information locked up within the four walls of the SOC does not provide true situational awareness. Hyper-scalable visual platforms Instead there is a need to be able to deliver the video stream, the dashboard of the data and information to any screen anywhere, at any time — including desktops, tablets phones — for the right people to see, whether that is an executive in a different office or working from home, or security guards walking the halls or streets. New technologies are continuing to extend the reach and the benefits of security operation centres. However, interoperability plays a key role in bringing together AI, machine learning and computer vision technologies, in order to ensure data is turned into actionable data, which is delivered to the right people to provide ‘true’ situational awareness. Software-defined, AV-over-IP platforms are the perfect medium to facilitate this for any organisations with physical and cyber security needs.

We need to talk about intelligent enclosure protection
We need to talk about intelligent enclosure protection

Enclosures containing electronics, communications or cabling infrastructure offer a simple attack point for cyber breaches and an opportunity for a physical attack on the hardware. Yet, many of these assets are housed within enclosures that provide minimal security features to offer a deterrent to any would-be attacker. This has always just been a pet hate. Walking down the high street of a town anywhere in the United Kingdom, you can often see open street communication cabinets. You can actually look directly inside at the equipment. And if I was a bad guy, I could quite easily just put my foot into their enclosure and quite quickly take out their infrastructure. Charged service for enclosures This seems crazy when a US$ 2 magnetic contact on a door can quickly tell you whether your enclosure is open or shut, and can be vital in keeping your network alive. Moreover, the operators of these systems, whether it is telecoms or internet providers, are providing a charged service to their customers, so they should really be protecting their enclosures. Why has that security level not been so readily taken into the outside world, into the unprotected environment? More sobering, if you contrast this security approach to the approach taken in the data centre world, an environment that already has multiple stringent security protocols in place, you get a very different picture. For instance, security devices can capture snapshots of anyone who opens a cabinet door in a data room, so it is recorded who has opened that door. While that is just one simple example, it begs the question. Why has that security level not been so readily taken into the outside world, into the unprotected environment? In my mind, a lot of it boils down simply to education. Network connection, easy point of cyber attacks Our preconceived idea about cyber security is some big corporation being knocked out or held to ransom by, again in our mind, someone sitting at a laptop, probably with their hood up over their head, typing away in the darkness, attacking us through the internet. But how the would-be criminal is going to come at us is just like in sport. They attack at the weakest point. Networks can be deployed in the outside world in many ways, such as cameras monitoring the highways. That means those locations will have a network connection. And that can be a point of attack in a non-secure outside world. Enclosures can be broken into by attackers Many people think, ‘That is okay because I’m going to take that ethernet device that my cameras are connected to and I’m going to put it inside an enclosure.’ However, what people do not realize is that the only thing that the enclosure is doing is protecting the ethernet device from Mother Nature. Because, without proper security, those enclosures can be broken into pretty easily. Many of them are just a single key that is not in any way coded to the device. Twofold cyber security People need to realise that cyber security is twofold. It can be carried out by hacking the network or physically breaking Therein lays the problem. People need to realise that cyber security is twofold. It can be carried out by hacking the network or physically breaking into the weakest physical point. And so, a simple boot through the open door of an enclosure can vandalise the devices inside and take down a small or large part of a network. And by definition, this meets the criteria for a cyber-attack. So, how do we go about tackling this problem? Well, security is a reaction marketplace. And for enclosures, there’s not, at present, a plethora of solutions out there for to counter these types of attacks. It can be challenging to find what you’re looking for through a quick Google search compared to searching for more traditional security protection measures. Deploying smart sensors and detectors But, under Vanderbilt and ComNet, we are currently taking our knowledge and experience from system installation and compiling it together. We’re bringing different products from different parts of our business to make a true solution. For instance, we have sensors for enclosures that detect anything from gas or smoke to open doors, detectors that will tell you if someone is trying to smash open your enclosure with a sledgehammer, or that someone is trying to lift your enclosure off of its mount. More importantly, as is not really a one-size-fits-all solution, we have developed a menu structure available that allows customers to pick and choose the ones that will best fit their own requirements.

We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?
We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?

While the application of facial recognition within both public and private spheres continues to draw criticism from those who see it as a threat to civil rights, this technology has become extremely commonplace in the lives of iPhone users. It is so prevalent, in fact, that by 2024 it is predicted that 90% of smartphones will use biometric facial recognition hardware. CCTV surveillance cameras  Similarly, CCTV is a well-established security measure that many of us are familiar with, whether through spotting images displayed on screens in shops, hotels and offices, or noticing cameras on the side of buildings. It is therefore necessary we ask the question of why, when facial recognition is integrated with security surveillance technology, does it become such a source of contention? It is not uncommon for concerns to be voiced against innovation. History has taught us that it is human nature to fear the unknown, especially if it seems that it may change life as we know it. Yet technology is an ever-changing, progressive part of the 21st century and it is important we start to shift the narrative away from privacy threats, to the force for good that LFR (Live Facial Recognition) represents. Live Facial Recognition (LFR) We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition Across recent weeks, we have seen pleas from UK organisations to allow better police access to facial recognition technology in order to fight crime. In the US, there are reports that LAPD is the latest police force to be properly regulating its use of facial recognition to aid criminal investigations, which is certainly a step in the right direction. While it is understandable that society fears technology that they do not yet understand, this lack of knowledge is exactly why the narrative needs to shift. We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition, we respect these anxieties. However, it is time to level the playing field of the facial recognition debate and communicate the plethora of benefits it offers society. Facial recognition technology - A force for good Facial recognition technology has already reached such a level of maturity and sophistication that there are huge opportunities for it to be leveraged as a force for good in real-world scenarios. As well as making society safer and more secure, I would go as far to say that LFR is able to save lives. One usage that could have a dramatic effect on reducing stress in people with mental conditions is the ability for facial recognition to identify those with Alzheimer’s. If an older individual is seemingly confused, lost or distressed, cameras could alert local medical centres or police stations of their identity, condition and where they need to go (a home address or a next of kin contact). Granted, this usage would be one that does incorporate a fair bit of personal data, although this information would only be gathered with consent from each individual. Vulnerable people could volunteer their personal data to local watchlists in order to ensure their safety when out in society, as well as to allow quicker resolutions of typically stressful situations. Tracking and finding missing persons Another possibility for real world positives to be drawn from facial recognition is to leverage the technology to help track or find missing persons, a lost child for instance. The most advanced forms of LFR in the market are now able to recognise individuals even if up to 50% of their face is covered and from challenging or oblique angles. Therefore, there is a significant opportunity not only to return people home safely, more quickly, but also reduce police hours spent on analysing CCTV footage. Rapid scanning of images Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match, as a more reliable and less time-consuming option than the human alternative. Freed-up officers could also then work more proactively on the ground, patrolling their local areas and increasing community safety and security twofold. It is important to understand that these facial recognition solutions should not be applied to every criminal case, and the technology must be used responsibly. However, these opportunities to use LFR as force for good are undeniable.   Debunking the myths One of the central concerns around LFR is the breach of privacy that is associated with ‘watchlists’. There is a common misconception, however, that the data of every individual that passes a camera is processed and then stored. The reality is that watch lists are compiled with focus on known criminals, while the general public can continue life as normal. The very best facial recognition will effectively view a stream of blurred faces, until it detects one that it has been programmed to recognise. For example, an individual that has previously shoplifted from a local supermarket may have their biometric data stored, so when they return to that location the employees are alerted to a risk of further crimes being committed. Considering that the cost of crime prevention to retailers in recent years has been around £1 billion, which therefore impacts consumer prices and employee wages, security measures to tackle this issue are very much in the public interest. Most importantly, the average citizen has no need to fear being ‘followed’ by LFR cameras. If data is stored, it is for a maximum of 0.6 seconds before being deleted. Privacy Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story. It is essential we spend more time and effort communicating exactly why watchlists are made, who they are made for and how they are being used, if we want to de-bunk myths and change the narrative. As science and technology professionals, heading up this exciting innovation, we must put transparency and accountability at the centre of what we do. Tony Porter, former Surveillance Camera Commissioner and current CPO at Corsight AI, has previously worked on developing processes that audit and review watch lists. Such restrictions are imperative in order for AI and LFR to be used legally, as well as ethically and responsibly. Biometrics, mask detection and contactless payments Nevertheless, the risks do not outweigh the benefits. Facial recognition should and can be used for good in so many more ways than listed above, including biometric, contactless payments, detecting whether an individual is wearing a facemask and is therefore, safe to enter a building, identifying a domestic abuse perpetrator returning to the scene of a crime and alerting police. There are even opportunities for good that we have not thought of yet. It is therefore not only a waste not to use this technology where we can, prioritising making society a safer place, it is immoral to stand by and let crimes continue while we have effective, reliable mitigation solutions.  

Latest Siqura B.V. news

Siqura announces that they will group all of their activities under TKH Security banner
Siqura announces that they will group all of their activities under TKH Security banner

All Siqura activities will continue under the banner of TKH Security. These renowned companies in video security solutions were both already members of TKH Group NV. The Siqura video security solutions are often sold in combination with the developed security solutions of TKH Security and this complete solution is highly appreciated by their customers worldwide. Therefore, the time has come to group all activities in TKH Security. “By combining all activities, we give our customers more transparency and clarity in what we can offer them. Furthermore, we increase our services. For example, the contact point for all questions and orders, invoices, documentation, support tickets, etc. will be centralised. This will be much more efficient for our customers as well as our employees”, says Timme Grijpink, Managing Director of TKH Security. Site management solutions TKH Security specialises in the development of electronic Security & Site Management Systems The Siqura brand will be retained for the wide product range of Siqura, such as security cameras, mobility cameras, marine cameras, explosion-proof and thermal cameras, IP video encoders, ethernet switches and fibre optic transmitters. This product range is complementary to the TKH Security product range, encompassing security management, video management, parking facility management and asset & site management solutions. With this aggregation of activities TKH Security has offices worldwide in Amsterdam, Gouda and Zoetermeer (the Netherlands), Madrid (Spain), Dubai (UAE), Singapore and Frederick (USA). TKH Security specialises in the development of electronic Security & Site Management Systems. Open architecture integration With over 25 years of experience and by listening to customer needs, the company offers complete innovative solutions for Security Management, Access Control, Video Management, Intrusion Detection, Intercom, Personal Surveillance, Asset & Site Management and Parking Facility Management. The company is always looking for innovative solutions for the market with a focus on creative, flexible and open architecture integration. TKH Security has a strong position in the Benelux and multiple offices all over the world. TKH Security is a member of TKH Group N.V.

TKH Security provides VMS with Siqura cameras for the wet infrastructure sector
TKH Security provides VMS with Siqura cameras for the wet infrastructure sector

The road network is under increasing pressure due to the sheer weight of traffic, and its bridges and water locks are no exception. In view of the importance of free-flowing traffic and the safety of such structures, they undergo continuous modernisation. One such modernisation is CCTV: by incorporating video surveillance into a security system, end-users can monitor and anticipate upon what’s happening at a certain location in real-time. This increases the efficiency and safety of such objects. Video management system Operators are continually fed the latest information through the video management system, allowing them to effectively anticipate any situation that may arise. This makes it possible to guarantee an optimum flow of vehicles and ships and to better respond to changing traffic situations in critical environments. TKH Security is specialised in video management systems in combination with Siqura cameras, thereby meeting the stricter laws and regulations governing the wet infrastructure sector. Motion detection Robin de Neve, International Sales Manager: “At TKH Security, we have been involved in wet infrastructure for many years and therefore know like no other how, in conjunction with installation engineers, to provide support to end users in the challenges they face in the sector. Thanks to the latest compression techniques and dual streaming, motion detection has become very efficient in terms of storage. Among the great advantages to operators is the fact that the system is very user friendly, it records only what is needed and it is exceedingly reliable thanks to failover functionality.” Easy-to-use high tech De Neve goes on to say: “Custom configurations can be made for individual operators, with panels to review images, for instance, control elements for third-party systems, HTML browsers and maps. The system has an open architecture and is API and ONVIF compatible, making installation and integration very easy. Using a powerful macro engine, customers can determine how the system responds given specific situations. Our video surveillance solution is scalable from a few to a few thousand cameras. Thermal cameras detect people on structures in all weather conditions, including rain, fog and low sun. In such cases, a signal is sent automatically to the control room so that operators can immediately respond if necessary.” Cameras with existing cabling Many structures such as bridges and water locks currently still use analogue solutions, and replacing existing cabling to enable an IP solution is often considered to be too expensive. TKH Security has special hybrid cameras that feature both analogue BNC connectors and SFP slots in addition to a regular network connection, making it possible to link them to several SFP modules: the Siqura 920 series. It is therefore not necessary to replace existing cabling, which considerably reduces costs. The hybrid cameras make it possible to use old-fashioned coaxial/analogue networks and still be able to migrate to IP cameras.

Siqura and TKH Security integrates surveillance and access control system for Sheikh Khalifa Central Hospital
Siqura and TKH Security integrates surveillance and access control system for Sheikh Khalifa Central Hospital

Siqura and TKH Security realised a fully integrated surveillance and access control system in the Sheikh Khalifa Central Hospital. This new hospital is located at the eastern edge of the emirate of Fujairah and will provide better 24/7 health services to citizens on the Eastern coast. The hospital consists of 11 specialised departments, a 32-bed emergency ward, a 3-storey rehabilitation building and more than 700 parking spots. Integration of multiple systems This hospital required a complete surveillance solution integrated with healthcare applications. The project combined access control and video management from TKH Security with cameras from Siqura. "We worked closely with our partners to comply with the solution which conforms to the new guidelines in Fujairah” says Tariq Anwer, Sales Director – Middle East & West Asia with Siqura. “The video surveillance component consists of around 700 different Siqura cameras, working with VDG Sense video management software and storage from TKH Security. The iProtect access control system, also from TKH Security manages around 400 doors with card and pin authentication. iProtect security management system is able to flawlessly fulfil the set of complex requirements demanded by this client.” Security management system healthcare facility For Siqura Middle East & West Asia and TKH Security, Sheikh Khalifa Central Hospital in Fujairah is a prestigious project in the healthcare segment. The integration of multiple systems under one roof combined with the integration of healthcare applications provided an extra challenge. Tariq Anwer: “The scope of the project involved an integrated security management system consisting of Siqura cameras, VDG Sense VMS and iProtect access control." "These are all managed at an upper level by iProtect security management system. Among others, some of the following features are implemented: managing visitors on-site and mustering system for emergency evacuation. This is in addition to the integration option with third party systems, for example baby-monitoring.”

Related white papers

Delivering a smart, secure and healthy workplace with cloud

Ensuring cybersecurity of video

The inevitability of The Cloud