Announcing Honeywell IP roadshows across Europe
Announcing Honeywell IP roadshows across Europe

EQUIP® your business for the future. Honeywell is IP-ready, are you?Between April and June, Honeywell will be hosting FREE half-day events across Europe showcasing our full IP video and security capability. Take this opportunity to see our full IP portfolio in action in your area and learn how to turn this technology into a business opportunity.Being Demonstrated:  EQUIP® IP Cameras  Including IP-ready PTZ, mini-dome, box, megapixel and NEW High Definition mini dome cameras all supported by Milestone XProtect™  NetAXS™ Web Based Access Control   NetAXS™ gives you all the benefits of traditional access control without additional hardware or installation costs as you can manage it via a web browser where ever you may be.  Fusion IV NVR and Hybrid DVR   The most powerful Fusion yet is the ideal platform to pull together all your IP and analogue cameras into one common viewing and storage platform. Or choose the Fusion NVR for a pure IP solution  Add intelligent video analytics for a more impactful and proactive video surveillance solution  Add access control/intruder integration for a comprehensive security solution  Integrated IP Solutions Galaxy Dimension is a Grade 3 integrated intrusion and access control system widely used across many sectors requiring large security systems, including retail, financial, local authority, and industrial environments.Built on reliable Galaxy technology it provides flexibility to integrate seamlessly with other systems such as CCTV and environmental control to become an integral part of any building management solution.        To view the schedule of dates, to find out more and to book your place visit http://www.honeywellipsolutions.com/

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Honeywell adds six new H.264 IP cameras to its EQUIP series
Honeywell adds six new H.264 IP cameras to its EQUIP series

Honeywell has announced the addition of six IP cameras to its existing equIP IP product series. The new true day/night cameras are split into two ranges - 1080p and 720p wide dynamic – with each range incorporating three different models; an indoor only mini dome, a vandal resistant mini dome and a box camera. A core benefit of the new IP cameras is progressive scan video which enables improved detail on moving objects such as faces and car number plates. Furthermore, dual streaming allows each video stream to be configured with an individual resolution whilst Digital Noise Reduction (DNR) results in significant storage savings without sacrificing image quality in low light. The cameras can also be fully integrated with Honeywell’s MAXPRO NVR SE and XE 2.0 ranges to offer an efficient all Honeywell IP system. The high resolution of the 1080p cameras allows operators to digitally zoom for superior detail and to cover nearly three times the horizontal area compared with standard fixed analogue cameras, potentially reducing the number of cameras required to monitor a fixed space and lowering costs. The 1080p cameras’ superior image detail and ability to highlight small details, such as facial features, means they are suitable for installations that require enhanced detail when zooming in, and the highest possible resolution. The 720p cameras use wide dynamic technology to improve image visibility even in high contrast environments where objects are hard to identify due to severe backlight or shadows. This allows security personnel to identify subjects in challenging environments such as areas with strong back lighting or abrupt changes in illumination, or when looking from a well lit area into a darker one. The technology delivers video with near-perfect exposure in the harshest of lighting conditions enabling the operator to see recorded events more clearly for use as evidence or to inform decisions. “Successfully using IP technology to improve the quality, detail and resolution of video recording, particularly in challenging environments, is a constant focus for security manufacturers,” comments Mark Openshaw, Product Manager for Honeywell Security Group EMEA. “Helping installers and end users monitor wider areas and use video footage more effectively is driving the evolution of, and demand for IP solutions.”

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Honeywell unveils three new H.264, high definition true day / night cameras
Honeywell unveils three new H.264, high definition true day / night cameras

Honeywell has unveiled three new H.264, True day / night cameras; the HCD5MIHX box camera, the HD3MDIHX fixed mini dome for indoor use and the HD4MDIHX, a vandal resistant fixed mini dome. The cameras all use efficient compression technology to provide high picture quality at minimal bandwidth. Network and storage limitations have long been a barrier to the adoption of high definition (HD) cameras. Each new model provides 720p image quality at lower bandwidth by using H.264 compression to reduce the size of the digital video file by more than 50 per cent compared with the standard M-JPEG format. In addition, unlike some other solutions on the market, the cameras provide 720p resolution at full frame rate in low light and very little ‘noise' ensuring detail is optimised in images captured under these conditions without compromising on storage. The True/Day Night cameras also significantly reduce the cost of conversion to HD IP video by offering H.264 compression at a very competitive price compared to MPEG-4 cameras. This provides customers with a cost effective way of migrating straight to a HD IP system, which offers superior detail and image quality compared to analogue or VGA IP. From a cost efficiency perspective, the better quality widescreen picture these cameras provide also means that fewer cameras are required in some installations, making it potentially cheaper for end users to upgrade from analogue to HD models rather than from analogue to VGA IP.  The cameras can also be retrofitted on many existing DVR/NVR installations without requiring additional storage. Jeremy Kimber, Commercial Operational Marketing Leader EMEA comments: "With their high performance and low noise, these latest cameras are the ideal solution for customers who are seeking to optimise bandwidth and storage without compromising on picture quality." All three models conform to the PSIA specification supporting interoperability between network video products regardless of manufacturer. PSIA compliant devices are able to exchange live video, audio, metadata and control information and are automatically discovered and connected to network applications such as video management systems. Honeywell is uniquely positioned to provide security managers with an end-to-end IP system through its camera technology combined with products such as Fusion IV DVR/NVR and MAXPRO® VMS video management system to create a complete system for the end user.  For more information visit www.honeywellipsolutions.com.

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New HCX megapixel cameras from Honeywell
New HCX megapixel cameras from Honeywell

The Honeywell HCX Series of megapixel cameras provides network surveillance for high-resolution object recognition, indoors or out, beyond standard analogue camera capabilities and offers installation and equipment cost savings. When object recognition is needed over a vast field of view, one megapixel camera can often perform at the same level as standard analogue cameras with the quality of image facilitating significantly improved forensic analysis. Additionally, IP connectivity lets users view and control cameras from virtually anywhere and analogue video output lets users quickly customise the camera set-up and easily send snapshots or video clips to e-mail or FTP addresses.The HCX Series consists of three box style cameras:HCX13M - 1.3 megapixelsHCX3 - 3.1 megapixelsHCX5D - 5.0 megapixel True Day/Night functionality Set-up is quick and easy and can be customised through a Web client or from an NVR multi-zone motion detection to trigger motion-based video streaming and privacy zones for blocking portions of the scene that are not to be recorded. An analogue output facilitates set-up of zoom and focus of the lens using spot monitors and allows easy integration with public view monitors. Choose between 12 VDC/24 VAC power input or PoE 802.3 af for additional installation flexibility. Market opportunities The HCX Series provides optimum performance for both indoor and outdoor applications requiring higher resolution over a larger field of view than is available from a high-resolution analogue camera. Retail and banking industries greatly benefit from using megapixel cameras. When fraud is suspected or transactions are being audited, the operator can position the camera to view the complete till transaction process and zoom in to capture the ‘customer's' identifying features. Other applications include multi-lane carriageways, wide lobbies, gated entrances and loading bays.

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IP cameras - Expert commentary

We need to talk about intelligent enclosure protection
We need to talk about intelligent enclosure protection

Enclosures containing electronics, communications or cabling infrastructure offer a simple attack point for cyber breaches and an opportunity for a physical attack on the hardware. Yet, many of these assets are housed within enclosures that provide minimal security features to offer a deterrent to any would-be attacker. This has always just been a pet hate. Walking down the high street of a town anywhere in the United Kingdom, you can often see open street communication cabinets. You can actually look directly inside at the equipment. And if I was a bad guy, I could quite easily just put my foot into their enclosure and quite quickly take out their infrastructure. Charged service for enclosures This seems crazy when a US$ 2 magnetic contact on a door can quickly tell you whether your enclosure is open or shut, and can be vital in keeping your network alive. Moreover, the operators of these systems, whether it is telecoms or internet providers, are providing a charged service to their customers, so they should really be protecting their enclosures. Why has that security level not been so readily taken into the outside world, into the unprotected environment? More sobering, if you contrast this security approach to the approach taken in the data centre world, an environment that already has multiple stringent security protocols in place, you get a very different picture. For instance, security devices can capture snapshots of anyone who opens a cabinet door in a data room, so it is recorded who has opened that door. While that is just one simple example, it begs the question. Why has that security level not been so readily taken into the outside world, into the unprotected environment? In my mind, a lot of it boils down simply to education. Network connection, easy point of cyber attacks Our preconceived idea about cyber security is some big corporation being knocked out or held to ransom by, again in our mind, someone sitting at a laptop, probably with their hood up over their head, typing away in the darkness, attacking us through the internet. But how the would-be criminal is going to come at us is just like in sport. They attack at the weakest point. Networks can be deployed in the outside world in many ways, such as cameras monitoring the highways. That means those locations will have a network connection. And that can be a point of attack in a non-secure outside world. Enclosures can be broken into by attackers Many people think, ‘That is okay because I’m going to take that ethernet device that my cameras are connected to and I’m going to put it inside an enclosure.’ However, what people do not realize is that the only thing that the enclosure is doing is protecting the ethernet device from Mother Nature. Because, without proper security, those enclosures can be broken into pretty easily. Many of them are just a single key that is not in any way coded to the device. Twofold cyber security People need to realise that cyber security is twofold. It can be carried out by hacking the network or physically breaking Therein lays the problem. People need to realise that cyber security is twofold. It can be carried out by hacking the network or physically breaking into the weakest physical point. And so, a simple boot through the open door of an enclosure can vandalise the devices inside and take down a small or large part of a network. And by definition, this meets the criteria for a cyber-attack. So, how do we go about tackling this problem? Well, security is a reaction marketplace. And for enclosures, there’s not, at present, a plethora of solutions out there for to counter these types of attacks. It can be challenging to find what you’re looking for through a quick Google search compared to searching for more traditional security protection measures. Deploying smart sensors and detectors But, under Vanderbilt and ComNet, we are currently taking our knowledge and experience from system installation and compiling it together. We’re bringing different products from different parts of our business to make a true solution. For instance, we have sensors for enclosures that detect anything from gas or smoke to open doors, detectors that will tell you if someone is trying to smash open your enclosure with a sledgehammer, or that someone is trying to lift your enclosure off of its mount. More importantly, as is not really a one-size-fits-all solution, we have developed a menu structure available that allows customers to pick and choose the ones that will best fit their own requirements.

We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?
We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?

While the application of facial recognition within both public and private spheres continues to draw criticism from those who see it as a threat to civil rights, this technology has become extremely commonplace in the lives of iPhone users. It is so prevalent, in fact, that by 2024 it is predicted that 90% of smartphones will use biometric facial recognition hardware. CCTV surveillance cameras  Similarly, CCTV is a well-established security measure that many of us are familiar with, whether through spotting images displayed on screens in shops, hotels and offices, or noticing cameras on the side of buildings. It is therefore necessary we ask the question of why, when facial recognition is integrated with security surveillance technology, does it become such a source of contention? It is not uncommon for concerns to be voiced against innovation. History has taught us that it is human nature to fear the unknown, especially if it seems that it may change life as we know it. Yet technology is an ever-changing, progressive part of the 21st century and it is important we start to shift the narrative away from privacy threats, to the force for good that LFR (Live Facial Recognition) represents. Live Facial Recognition (LFR) We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition Across recent weeks, we have seen pleas from UK organisations to allow better police access to facial recognition technology in order to fight crime. In the US, there are reports that LAPD is the latest police force to be properly regulating its use of facial recognition to aid criminal investigations, which is certainly a step in the right direction. While it is understandable that society fears technology that they do not yet understand, this lack of knowledge is exactly why the narrative needs to shift. We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition, we respect these anxieties. However, it is time to level the playing field of the facial recognition debate and communicate the plethora of benefits it offers society. Facial recognition technology - A force for good Facial recognition technology has already reached such a level of maturity and sophistication that there are huge opportunities for it to be leveraged as a force for good in real-world scenarios. As well as making society safer and more secure, I would go as far to say that LFR is able to save lives. One usage that could have a dramatic effect on reducing stress in people with mental conditions is the ability for facial recognition to identify those with Alzheimer’s. If an older individual is seemingly confused, lost or distressed, cameras could alert local medical centres or police stations of their identity, condition and where they need to go (a home address or a next of kin contact). Granted, this usage would be one that does incorporate a fair bit of personal data, although this information would only be gathered with consent from each individual. Vulnerable people could volunteer their personal data to local watchlists in order to ensure their safety when out in society, as well as to allow quicker resolutions of typically stressful situations. Tracking and finding missing persons Another possibility for real world positives to be drawn from facial recognition is to leverage the technology to help track or find missing persons, a lost child for instance. The most advanced forms of LFR in the market are now able to recognise individuals even if up to 50% of their face is covered and from challenging or oblique angles. Therefore, there is a significant opportunity not only to return people home safely, more quickly, but also reduce police hours spent on analysing CCTV footage. Rapid scanning of images Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match, as a more reliable and less time-consuming option than the human alternative. Freed-up officers could also then work more proactively on the ground, patrolling their local areas and increasing community safety and security twofold. It is important to understand that these facial recognition solutions should not be applied to every criminal case, and the technology must be used responsibly. However, these opportunities to use LFR as force for good are undeniable.   Debunking the myths One of the central concerns around LFR is the breach of privacy that is associated with ‘watchlists’. There is a common misconception, however, that the data of every individual that passes a camera is processed and then stored. The reality is that watch lists are compiled with focus on known criminals, while the general public can continue life as normal. The very best facial recognition will effectively view a stream of blurred faces, until it detects one that it has been programmed to recognise. For example, an individual that has previously shoplifted from a local supermarket may have their biometric data stored, so when they return to that location the employees are alerted to a risk of further crimes being committed. Considering that the cost of crime prevention to retailers in recent years has been around £1 billion, which therefore impacts consumer prices and employee wages, security measures to tackle this issue are very much in the public interest. Most importantly, the average citizen has no need to fear being ‘followed’ by LFR cameras. If data is stored, it is for a maximum of 0.6 seconds before being deleted. Privacy Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story. It is essential we spend more time and effort communicating exactly why watchlists are made, who they are made for and how they are being used, if we want to de-bunk myths and change the narrative. As science and technology professionals, heading up this exciting innovation, we must put transparency and accountability at the centre of what we do. Tony Porter, former Surveillance Camera Commissioner and current CPO at Corsight AI, has previously worked on developing processes that audit and review watch lists. Such restrictions are imperative in order for AI and LFR to be used legally, as well as ethically and responsibly. Biometrics, mask detection and contactless payments Nevertheless, the risks do not outweigh the benefits. Facial recognition should and can be used for good in so many more ways than listed above, including biometric, contactless payments, detecting whether an individual is wearing a facemask and is therefore, safe to enter a building, identifying a domestic abuse perpetrator returning to the scene of a crime and alerting police. There are even opportunities for good that we have not thought of yet. It is therefore not only a waste not to use this technology where we can, prioritising making society a safer place, it is immoral to stand by and let crimes continue while we have effective, reliable mitigation solutions.  

Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre
Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre

Urban populations are expanding rapidly around the globe, with an expected growth of 1.56 billion by 2040. As the number of people living and working in cities continues to grow, the ability to keep everyone safe is an increasing challenge. However, technology companies are developing products and solutions with these futuristic cities in mind, as the reality is closer than you may think. Solutions that can help to watch over public places and share data insights with city workers and officials are increasingly enabling smart cities to improve the experience and safety of the people who reside there. Rising scope of 5G, AI, IoT and the Cloud The main foundations that underpin smart cities are 5G, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Cloud. Each is equally important, and together, these technologies enable city officials to gather and analyse more detailed insights than ever before. For public safety in particular, having IoT and cloud systems in place will be one of the biggest factors to improving the quality of life for citizens. Smart cities have come a long way in the last few decades, but to truly make a smart city safe, real-time situational awareness and cross-agency collaboration are key areas which must be developed as a priority. Innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns. From dangerous drivers to terrorist attacks, petty crime on the streets to high profile bank robberies, innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT and cloud technologies can go some way to helping respond quickly to, and in some cases even prevent, the most serious incidents. Many existing safety systems in cities rely on aging and in some places legacy technology, such as video surveillance cameras. Many of these also use on-premises systems rather than utilising the benefits of the cloud. Smart programming to deliver greater insights These issues, though not creating a major problem today, do make it more challenging for governments and councils to update their security. Changing every camera in a city is a huge undertaking, but in turn, doing so would enable all cameras to be connected to the cloud, and provide more detailed information which can be analysed by smart programming to deliver greater insights. The physical technologies that are currently present in most urban areas lack the intelligent connectivity, interoperability and integration interfaces that smart cities need. Adopting digital technologies isn’t a luxury, but a necessity. Smart surveillance systems It enables teams to gather data from multiple sources throughout the city in real-time, and be alerted to incidents as soon as they occur. Increased connectivity and collaboration ensures that all teams that need to be aware of a situation are informed instantly. For example, a smart surveillance system can identify when a road accident has occurred. It can not only alert the nearest ambulance to attend the scene, but also the local police force to dispatch officers. An advanced system that can implement road diversions could also close roads around the incident immediately and divert traffic to other routes, keeping everyone moving and avoiding a build-up of vehicles. This is just one example: without digital systems, analysing patterns of vehicle movements to address congestion issues could be compromised, as would the ability to build real-time crime maps and deploy data analytics which make predictive policing and more effective crowd management possible. Cloud-based technologies Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation that is needed to overcome the limitations of traditional security systems. Using these, smart cities can develop a fully open systems architecture that delivers interoperation with both local and other remote open systems. The intelligence of cloud systems can not only continue to allow for greater insights as technology develops over time, but it can do so with minimal additional infrastructure investment. Smart surveillance in the real world Mexico City has a population of almost 9 million people, but if you include the whole metropolitan area, this number rises sharply to over 21 million in total, making it one of the largest cities on the planet. Seven years ago, the city first introduced its Safe City initiative, and ever since has been developing newer and smarter ways to keep its citizens safe. In particular, its cloud-based security initiative is making a huge impact. Over the past three years, Mexico City has installed 58,000 new video surveillance cameras throughout the city, in public spaces and on transport, all of which are connected to the City’s C5 (Command, Control, Computers, Communications and Citizen Contact) facility. Smart Cities operations The solution enables officers as well as the general public to upload videos via a mobile app to share information quickly, fixed, body-worn and vehicle cameras can also be integrated to provide exceptional insight into the city’s operations. The cloud-based platform can easily be upgraded to include the latest technology innovations such as licence plate reading, behavioural analysis software, video analytics and facial recognition software, which will all continue to bring down crime rates and boost response times to incidents. The right cloud approach Making the shift to cloud-based systems enables smart cities to eliminate dependence on fibre-optic connectivity and take advantage of a variety of Internet and wireless connectivity options that can significantly reduce application and communication infrastructure costs. Smart cities need to be effective in years to come, not just in the present day, or else officials have missed one of the key aspects of a truly smart city. System designers must build technology foundations now that can be easily adapted in the future to support new infrastructure as it becomes available. Open system architecture An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations For example, this could include opting for a true cloud application that can support cloud-managed local devices and automate their management. An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations and deliver additional value-add services to citizens as greater capabilities become possible in the years to come. The advances today in cloud and IoT technologies are rapid, and city officials and authorities have more options now to develop their smart cities than ever before and crucially, to use these innovations to improve public safety. New safety features Though implementing these cloud-based systems now requires investment, as new safety features are designed, there will be lower costs and challenges associated with introducing these because the basic infrastructure will already exist. Whether that’s gunshot detection or enabling the sharing of video infrastructure and data across multiple agencies in real time, smart video surveillance on cloud-based systems can bring a wealth of the new opportunities.

Latest Honeywell news

Honeywell expands its MAXPRO Cloud portfolio with addition of MPA1 and MPA2 access control panels
Honeywell expands its MAXPRO Cloud portfolio with addition of MPA1 and MPA2 access control panels

Honeywell announced the expansion of capabilities of its MAXPRO Cloud portfolio with the launch of MPA1 and MPA2 access control panels that offer cloud, web-based or on-premise hosting options. “Our technologies can be integrated into existing systems, helping our customers create and maintain flexible, bespoke solutions that are best suited to their needs, which is especially important for SMBs,” said Rick Koscinski, North America General Manager, Honeywell Commercial Security. Rick adds, “Our new MPA1 and MPA2 control panels strengthens our MAXPRO Cloud offering by giving users cost-effective access control functionality and real-time security information from anywhere.” MAXPRO Cloud security solution MAXPRO Cloud is a cloud-based security solution designed for multi-site small and medium-sized businesses, which provides effective and efficient security and safety, while minimising IT costs and future-proofing investments. The MAXPRO Cloud solution integrates access control and video into an integrated and easy to use platform The MAXPRO Cloud solution integrates access control and video into an integrated and easy-to-use platform, and is used to protect multi-site infrastructure, such as retail, franchises, multi-tenant commercial and residential properties, schools and churches. With features such as global credential management, automated reporting and remote management of doors and schedules, the cloud-based security system is not only a great security solution, but also a powerful business tool. MPA1 single door POE-powered controller MPA1, a single door POE-powered controller is easy to install, operate and maintain, thanks to its unique edge installation design and its dedicated Device Utility App for fast and easy commissioning. It can either be mounted in a U.S. single gang junction box or in a specially designed compact enclosure with Status LED diagnostics. In addition, the embedded web interface allows the MPA1 to operate in stand-alone mode in single and multi-panel solutions. Honeywell MPA1 control panels feature: Flexible capability: With its small design and sleek enclosure, it can be leveraged for diverse deployment across a variety of jobs. In standalone mode, MPA1 can control a single door or manage multiple networked controllers. Faster installation: Single door Power over Ethernet (PoE) powered edge controller is fast and easy to commission via the Device Utility App on an Android or iOS mobile phone. At-the-door mounting decreases cable runs and with the small edge design, the MPA1 fits in U.S. single gang junction box. Only Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP) support: The latest communication technology for card readers provides strong encryption, bi-directional communication and improved cyber security resilience. It gives users the option of forming a platform that can be expanded in the future. It also features SSL certificate security, safeguarding connections to the panel. MPA1 has been developed with a small installer-friendly design that easily adapts to existing IT infrastructure and methods, reducing installation and support costs and supports OSDP reader connections, ensuring end-to-end secure communication from smart card to the host. So, as a system grows, MPA1 grows as well. MPA2 cloud-based access control panel MPA2 is a cloud and standalone access control panel for two door access control. The MPA2 panel features enhanced security due to a 128-bit AES encrypted bi-directional Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP) communication with access control readers. This combination of features, bolstered by an intuitive, browser-based user interface, gives customers an easy-to-use and secure site-access system. Users can manage MPA2 securely using Ethernet or Internet connections.  Honeywell MPA2 control panels feature: Flexible 3-in-1 capability: Embedded, cloud- or software-hosted capability from one panel. This means that MPA2 can be deployed for a large variety of jobs, from basic access control for a single site to multi-site, enterprise-level security with fully integrated access, video and Faster installation: User-friendly, screwdriver-less installation is facilitated by push-in connectors and RJ45 cabling, halving the time previously required in fitting similar panels and offering benefits to installers, in terms of reduced operation and maintenance costs. IP-based hardware with Power over Ethernet (PoE) PLUS capability eliminates additional network module wiring and simplifies powering the panel. At-the-door mounting also decreases cable runs. MPA2 is built to use the Structure Cabling System in new buildings, where network/RJ45 cabling is already in place, reducing installation cost by up to 50%. Wiegand and OSDP Support: Next to legacy Wiegand communication, which makes it easy to connect to the most common Wiegand connected readers, MPA2 provides the latest communication technology for card readers for strong encryption, bi-directional communication and improved cyber security resilience. It gives users the option of forming a platform that can be expanded in the future. It also features SSL certificate security, safeguarding connections to the panel. MPA2 offers a simplified approach to security management, improving business and employee productivity, by reducing both training and operating time. The new panel is available as a standalone product and can be fitted into existing security set-ups with ease.

Honeywell and IDEMIA announce a strategic alliance to develop an intelligent and seamless building ecosystem
Honeywell and IDEMIA announce a strategic alliance to develop an intelligent and seamless building ecosystem

Honeywell, a global provider of connected buildings, and IDEMIA, a global provider of Augmented Identity, announced a strategic alliance to create and cultivate an intelligent building ecosystem that provides a more seamless and enhanced experience for operators and occupants alike. The alliance will integrate Honeywell’s security and building management systems with IDEMIA’s biometric-based access control systems to create frictionless, safer and more efficient buildings. The Honeywell and IDEMIA alliance is intended to design solutions that will allow occupants to easily and securely have contactless engagement with a building - from vehicle recognition at the car park and automatic elevator calls to biometric-based access and personalised conference room settings. With a focus on security and data privacy, these next-generation solutions will provide occupants with a safer, more efficient and more enjoyable experience that will help building owners attract tenants. Complex security requirements “We recognise that our customers need to deliver business outcomes like managing complex security requirements and providing healthier, more productive environments,” said Manish Sharma, Vice President, Chief Technology and Chief Product Officer for Honeywell Building Technologies. We will create an intelligent building ecosystem that better addresses our customers’ key challenges" “By working with IDEMIA, we will create an intelligent building ecosystem that better addresses our customers’ key challenges and drives their desired outcomes. Whether it’s a commercial office building, a hospital or an airport, we have the ability to change the way people experience and interact with buildings for the better.” Safety and security systems “We look forward to expanding our long-standing relationship with Honeywell to bring greater value to our customers with more integrated solutions that make for a more seamless building experience,” said Matt Cole, CEO, Secure Enterprise Transactions Division, IDEMIA. “The ability for our technology to easily integrate with Honeywell safety and security systems will provide building owners and operators more insight and control into creating more efficient buildings, while putting the occupant experience first.” Facial recognition terminal IDEMIA’s field-proven AI-based products and solutions - like MorphoWaveTM, a contactless fingerprint device that scans four fingerprints in less than one second; VisionPass, the most advanced facial recognition terminal; or Augmented Vision, a biometric video analytics platform - integrate with Honeywell security and building management systems. Honeywell’s systems include Pro-Watch Integrated Security Suite, MAXPRO Cloud and Enterprise Buildings Integrator. Honeywell and IDEMIA will work together to deliver powerful integrations through aligned product creation Honeywell and IDEMIA will work together to deliver more powerful integrations through aligned product creation and joint product roadmaps. The integrated offerings will allow building operators to respond rapidly and effectively to alarms or incidents by providing an incident workflow package that allows Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) to be configured, reducing compliance exceptions, security risks and response times. Personal protection equipment IDEMIA products also support Honeywell’s Healthy Buildings solutions that help building owners improve building environments, operate more cleanly and safely and encourage sustained compliance with changing building standards, safety guidelines, government-issued regulations and a company's risk management policies. Honeywell's Healthy Buildings solutions provide a holistic view of a building's health based on key factors such as indoor air quality, occupant flow, personal protection equipment (PPE) analytics, contactless access, thermal screening, social distancing and sanitation efficacy.

ASSA ABLOY integrates Aperio wireless lock technology with Connect ONE platform from Connected Technologies
ASSA ABLOY integrates Aperio wireless lock technology with Connect ONE platform from Connected Technologies

ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions completed the integration of their Aperio® wireless lock technology with the Connect ONE® cloud-hosted management platform from Connected Technologies, Monument, Colo. Connect ONE manages all connected customer devices, including wireless and hardwired locks, access control, intrusion, video surveillance, critical environmental monitoring and energy management from a single interface. “We’re excited to present this integration with industry leading ASSA ABLOY Aperio wireless devices to Connect ONE dealers,” said Mike Simon, Managing Partner of Connected Technologies. Global wireless platform “Now, dealers can easily expand their services to more doors and offer new protection possibilities that save installation time and money. In addition, the Aperio/Connect ONE integration works with popular Bosch, DMP, ELK and Honeywell Vista panels so they can be up and running with new specs quickly.” The Aperio integration offers Connect ONE customers an easy way to connect additional wireless locks to new and existing installations. Aperio is a global wireless platform that works with extensive locking hardware options from ASSA ABLOY Group brands, offering the flexibility to address a variety of applications throughout any facility. The platform uses wireless communication (IEEE 802.15.4) between the lock and an Aperio hub to provide real-time communication to the access control system, simplifying installation and reducing costs. Encrypted wireless connection The integration also allows for a mapped hardwired relay output to initiate an auxiliary control upon access Aperio wireless locks map directly to the intrusion areas for an immediate armed status review to deny access when armed and can also disarm intrusion with proper authority upon granted access at the lock. Since the wireless locks are highly integrated with the control panel, user permissions are applied exactly the same for hardwired readers, allowing for a mix of wireless and hardwired reader/locks without additional set-up complexity. The integration also allows for a mapped hardwired relay output to initiate an auxiliary control upon access and a relay output to control an external door opener. Aperio locks use an encrypted wireless connection to an Aperio IP hub; each hub can communicate to a maximum of 64 locks. Highly flexible solution “Connect ONE offers a simple, scalable solution that complements the Aperio offering perfectly,” stated Mark Duato, Executive Vice President, Aftermarket, ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions Americas. “This integration will offer dealers and end-users a highly flexible solution for comprehensive access management.” Connect One’s ScanPass® Mobile Credential smartphone control is also supported with the integration, eliminating the need for card or fob credentials. Dealers can contact ASSA ABLOY to become certified to offer Aperio locks, which come in a variety of form factors and can be purchased through ASSA ABLOY Authorised Channel Partners.

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