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ONVIF Profile T and H.265: the evolution of video compression
ONVIF Profile T and H.265: the evolution of video compression

In today’s market, efficient use of bandwidth and storage is an essential part of maintaining an effective video surveillance system. A video management system’s ability to provide analysis, real time event notifications and crucial image detail is only as a good as the speed and bandwidth of a surveillance network. In the physical security industry, H.264 is the video compression format used by most companies. Some companies also employ H.264 enhancements to compress areas of an image that are irrelevant to the user at a higher ratio within a video stream in order to preserve image quality for more important details like faces, license plates or buildings. The H.265, H.264’s successor, will be increasingly used for compression in the future. Some companies are already using H.265 in their cameras and video management systems, while a host of other manufacturers are certainly preparing for its broader adoption in the years to come. Video compression technologies Reduced bandwidth and storage requirements are the primary benefits of video compression technologies Reduced bandwidth and storage requirements are the primary benefits of video compression technologies. In some cases, H.265 can double the data compression ratio of H.264, while retaining the same quality. Increased compression rate translates into decreased storage requirements on hard drives, less bandwidth usage and fewer switches – all of which reduce overall costs of system ownership. H.265 compression delivers a lower bitrate than H.264, which is relevant to end users and integrators because the lower bitrate reduces strain on hardware and can reduce playback issues. It’s very important that the compression format that is used is supported in all of the different components of a system: cameras, desktop computers on which the VMS is running and the VMS itself. It is also good for end users and integrators to understand the basics of video compression. Having a basic understanding of compression allows users to tweak settings to reduce bandwidth usage even more. Many cameras come with default settings that can be changed to ultimately reduce costs. ONVIF physical security In the physical security industry, ONVIF is working to incorporate into its specifications the use of new formats such as H.265 but is not directly involved in developing the compression standards themselves. With Profile T, the new ONVIF video profile released will employ a new media service that is compression agnostic. This means that it can support new video compression formats, including H.265, as well as new audio compression formats, with the ability to include new video and audio codecs as needed in the future without having to redesign its media service. In the physical security industry, ONVIF is working to incorporate into its specifications the use of new formats such as H.265 Standardisation organisations that are directly addressing new compression standards include the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) and a joint commission of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), which is addressing the coding of audio, picture, multimedia and hypermedia information. Other compression formats on par with H.264 and H.265 are being developed by companies such as Google. H.265 compression formats Using products that employ H.265 compression will reduce costs through bandwidth reduction, as will changing default settings on cameras, which are often conservative. Having a basic understanding of compression formats and how to tweak camera factory default settings also gives integrators the ability to further reduce bandwidth for added costs savings and increased system performance. These enhancements will analyse which parts of an image are most important and adjust local levels of compressions accordingly It is also worth noting that H.265 enhancements will likely be developed by camera manufacturers to further reduce bandwidth, as was the case with H.264. These enhancements will analyze which parts of an image are most important and adjust local levels of compressions accordingly. While H.265 itself is ready for prime time, its value as a tool for IP-based surveillance systems is dependent on support for the codec in all parts of the system – the VMS, server hardware, graphics cards and camera. Though widespread H.265 adoption is predicted, providers of these components are jumping on the H.265 bandwagon at different rates of speed. ONVIF is including support for H.265 in its new video profile, Profile T, because it believes it will become the most widely used compression format and ONVIF recognises the need to anticipate that migration as a future need of the industry. The new media service, which will be implemented with Profile T, will be future-proof in that when new compression formats are released in the future, ONVIF can adopt them very quickly. That flexibility will definitely help integrators.

HD over Coax provides cost-effective video surveillance upgrade
HD over Coax provides cost-effective video surveillance upgrade

According to IHS Market, it is estimated that there are over 60 million security cameras in the United States, and other reports say these cameras capture more than four billion hours of footage per week. Over the last decade, IP camera technology has dominated the conversation as it has provided users with a broad offering of enhanced image quality and features. With a large percentage of existing security systems relying on analogue, many end users looking for high definition (HD) video quality have been forced to take on a complete system overhaul. Infrastructure overhaul for HD video To make the switch, customers would need to change everything, from cameras to hardware to wiring– not to mention the lengthy installation process that would ensue. IP cameras also require higher Internet speeds and more cloud space. Whether constrained by budget, bandwidth or storage, many end users have been unable to adopt this new video surveillance method.Thanks to technological advancements within the security industry, HD over Coax offers a viable solution for integrators and end users alike Thanks to technological advancements within the security industry, HD over Coax offers a viable solution for integrators and end users alike. By utilising the current Coaxial cables, this offering yields high definition video, while requiring minimal infrastructure changes and is an optimal surveillance choice for security customers. Plus, with new advancements and updates being made frequently to this technology, there is a solution for every security need. The enhanced alternative of HD over Coax has been warmly welcomed in the security industry, thanks to its simple solutions and ever-evolving features. Many new analogue HD cameras are “plug and play,” able to connect directly to existing Coaxial cables. This eliminates the need for a complete system change, creating cost-savings for the end user and an enhanced video quality offering. Easy solutions for HD video As a result, integrators can cost-effectively upgrade their customer’s surveillance solution while using their legacy infrastructure, making it an attractive option for end users and an easy sell for dealers. Latency in video is another common issue with network-based camera systems, where even the slightest delay in video surveillance can hinder security response HD over Coax cameras themselves are always expanding and evolving to meet a wide array of security needs. With the introduction of fisheye and multi-sensor cameras, users now have a multitude of coverage options, not to mention the introduction of 4K bringing resolution options to the same level as IP. Some newer technologies are even touting 4K cameras paired with 4K digital video recorders (DVRs) made specifically for analogue systems. Longer cables grant transmission for up to 1600 feet, double the distance of standard analogue solutions, and triple that of IP systems. This single cable is able to transmit both HD video and audio. Recently, broadcast quality audio over Coax has become available in limited models, a substantial improvement over older analogue technology, which was unable to transmit audio. Stopping video delay Latency in video is another common issue with network-based camera systems. Even the slightest delay in video surveillance can hinder security response. IP cameras are forced to compress and packetise their video for transmission. The outcome of this is a reduced number of images per video, which in turn causes delay. HD over Coax on the other hand, delivers an unlimited amount of HD images in real time, with smooth motion and impressive clarity. Additionally, the point-to-point transmission delivers uncompressed video free of lag. Another touted benefit is that, unlike IP networked cameras, analogue systems provide a more secure video transmission. With so much sensitive information housed on a businesses’ network, adding another point of network access through an IP camera can create concerns for cyber security risks. HD over Coax delivers an unlimited amount of HD images in real time, with smooth motion and impressive clarity Preventing network hacking With HD over Coax, the physical connections between the camera and DVR prevent network hacking. By keeping the video surveillance system offline, security professionals are able to direct their attention to the physical threats at hand, rather than having to focus on deterring cyber security risks. One of the primary difficulties of deploying HD video solutions is the fact that many older systems utilise a wide variety of HD standards and platforms. To make matters more complicated, after HD over Coax was brought to market, manufacturers raced to create their own version of this technology. Today, the most popular proprietary standards are HD-CVI, HD-TVI and AHD. However, integrators and customers found that attempting to manage multiple HD technologies proved to be near impossible.Integrators and customers found that attempting to manage multiple HD technologies proved to be near impossible Diversifying surveillance through one DVR To combat these issues, manufacturers have introduced products with more flexibility to their portfolios. One example of this is the penta-brid DVR which grants the ability to seamlessly integrate multiple technologies deployed across one application. This means that systems with diverse camera brands and technologies, such as a mix of HD-CVI, HD-TVI, AHD, analogue or IP, can be connected through one DVR. For many end users with legacy analogue systems, penta-brid DVRs give them greater freedom to choose between a variety of solutions, rather than being limited to one option. With video resolution increasing, the space needed to store the footage is similarly rising. Penta-brid technology has been able to adapt to these evolving needs, giving users ample storage space to house the HD and 4K surveillance video with some of the newest models including H.265 compression.  HD casino surveillance made simple For casinos, HD images are critical for identifying unauthorised personnel and unlawful behaviours to create a safe environment for guests and staff While HD over Coax is beneficial to many end users and integrators, those in the casino and hospitality markets find it crucial. With a combination of high profile guests, large amounts of cash on hand, constant crowds and strict industry regulations, reliable video surveillance is a must. Deploying new IP systems comes at a stiff price. When looking to upgrade their video surveillance, casinos must also be mindful of the installation process. When moving to an IP-based system, ripping out old wires and replacing them with new is the standard practice. This practice can be both disruptive and costly, not to mention gaming regulations require casino activities be monitored at all times so a complete system shutdown would result in revenue loss. This cost can be hard to justify, especially when the current legacy analogue system remains in working condition with only the lower image resolution to date it. For these scenarios, the most cost-effective option is to leverage the legacy infrastructure, replace the existing cameras with new devices, and reap the benefits that HD video has to offer without any lapse in security. For casinos, HD images are critical for identifying unauthorised personnel and unlawful behaviours to create a safe environment for guests and staff. HD over Coax cameras now offer the same resolution as IP cameras with a plug and play approach, that cuts down on expense without sacrificing quality. For businesses and applications that are unable to adopt IP technology, whether it be cost or time prohibitive, HD over Coax now features most of the same benefits IP has to offer without breaking the bank. By providing clear images in real time, maximising existing infrastructure, and affording cyber security benefits, HD over Coax provides an attractive solution for many end users and integrators.

Video surveillance must modernise in storage, recording and on-demand access
Video surveillance must modernise in storage, recording and on-demand access

Dollars spent by video surveillance customers must go towards ensuring high-availability capture, storage and on-demand access to live and archived video. Reaching this goal mandates high-availability of independent components – camera, network, storage (edge, external), internet connectivity, display, all Video Management Software (VMS) components and an architecture that can take advantage of this. In this note, we focus on seeing our way through to a video surveillance architecture, that provides high availability storage, access to live and stored video content. Of all options available to store recorded video, edge recording is the only one that is unaffected by network failure Edge recording Of all options available to store recorded video, edge recording is the only one that is unaffected by network failure. This makes edge storage a must-have. But, this has some limitations at present: Edge storage capacity is limited. Edge media has a short lifetime, rated only for thousands of hours of continuous recording. Most cameras are not secure and physical damage to the camera could lead to catastrophic loss of edge stored content. As storage and compression technology evolve, the constraints imposed by (1) and (2) could go away. However, securing cameras will continue to be a barrier for most installations. Secure external storage It is thus imperative to also store video in secure external storage. Such an architecture uses edge storage to fill in content gaps created by network, external storage outages. As edge storage technology improves, larger gaps can be filled in, but one will always need external storage. By our definition, ‘external storage’ is a solution stack that includes storage media and all software (including VMS) that provide access to this storage. Access to live and archived video Access to live video can either be met by external storage or directly by the camera Every surveillance solution needs to provide access to live and archived video. Access to live video can either be met by external storage or (and) directly by the camera. All things being equal, having the camera directly provide live video access, is a higher-availability solution. There is dependence on fewer components in the chain. Solutions in the market use one of the above two approaches for access to live video. Due to limited capacity and low physical security of edge storage, it makes sense at present, to have external storage meet all requests for archive video. Thus, we are led to an architecture that has heavy dependence on external storage. Dual-recording For high-availability, external storage must be architected with redundancy. Ideally, independent components that make up external storage – storage media, associated hardware and software (including VMS components), should be individually redundant and have smart interconnectivity. However, solutions in the market rigidly tie these components together. Failure of a single component causes failure of external storage. For e.g. hardware failure of a server causes VMS component failure AND storage failure. DR provides a smart way to provide high-availability for external storage For these solutions in the market, high-availability is achieved by having additional external storage units that step-in during outages of primary units. If these additional units continuously duplicate primary units, access gaps are minimised, and archive access is un-affected during primary unit outages. This is the idea behind Dual-Recording (DR).  To meet cost budgets, these additional units can be configured to store subsampled (framerate, resolution) video content. A small number of additional units can support concurrent outages of all primary units. A few-to-many redundancy. Rising need for dual-recording Most cameras cannot be physically secured, and video content produced by a camera must be stored externally. Many VMS solutions use external storage to service live video access requests. Edge storage limitations impose restrictions on edge archive access at present. So, external storage is used to service requests for archive access too. Thus, a surveillance system ends up being over-dependent on external storage. DR provides a smart way to provide high-availability for external storage. As edge storage improves, it will be able to service archive access requests. VMS software will need to evolve, to use this capability smartly.

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BSIA's CCTV seminar and exhibition in London to highlight recent developments in the CCTV sector
BSIA's CCTV seminar and exhibition in London to highlight recent developments in the CCTV sector

The event enables CCTV manufacturers and installers to showcase their latest technological developments A popular CCTV seminar and exhibition is set to arrive in London this November, and will provide an opportunity for CCTV companies to reach out to delegates from a range of organisations including local businesses, civic authorities and the Police. Organised by the British Security Industry Association (BSIA), the event will take place at London’s Emmanuel Centre on Marsham Street – close to the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey – on Thursday 12th November, and is expected to follow on from the success of a series of CCTV seminars held by the Association over the past couple of years, which have served to highlight the appetite for information regarding CCTV best practice among end-users and security buyers. A limited number of exhibition spaces are available at the event, enabling CCTV manufacturers and installers to showcase their latest technological developments, while an informative seminar will explore the latest changes in surveillance legislation and technology, while exploring recent developments in the CCTV sector. Confirmed speakers at the event include: Tony Porter LLB QPM, Surveillance Camera Commissioner Detective Chief Inspector Mick Neville, Central Forensic Image Team, Metropolitan Police Pauline Norstrom, Chief Operating Officer at AD Group / Dedicated Micros and Chairman of the BSIA Simon Adcock, Managing Director of ATEC Security and Chairman of the BSIA’s CCTV section James Barrett of Safer London The event is kindly sponsored by the British Standards Institute (BSI). The BSIA expects the event to attract around 150 delegates from a number of organisations across the South East, for whom admission will be free of charge. Meanwhile, exhibitors will benefit from the following: 1 table with electrical connection Refreshments / lunch (for 2) Company logo on the programme for the day Inclusion in pre and post event promotion, including press releases, email marketing and social media activity A copy of all delegates’ contact details, sent post-event The opportunity to promote attendance at the event via the BSIA’s YouTube Channel

BSIA Chairman’s Awards: Private security industry’s individuals and teams recognised
BSIA Chairman’s Awards: Private security industry’s individuals and teams recognised

The awards serve to recognise significant or lifelong contributions in five different categories Five individuals and teams have been presented with prestigious British Security Industry Association Chairman’s Awards to celebrate outstanding contributions they have made to the ongoing success of the UK’s private security industry. Personally selected by the BSIA’s Chairman, Pauline Norstrom, Chief Operating Officer at Dedicated Micros and AD Group, the awards serve to recognise significant or lifelong contributions in five different categories: Contribution to Standards, Contribution to the Community, Contribution to the Industry, Contribution to Training and Contribution to Exporting. This year’s awards were presented in a glittering awards ceremony at the BSIA’s Annual Luncheon at the London Hilton on Park Lane on 15th July. Details of this year’s winners are as follows: Contribution to standards The Chairman’s Award for Contribution to Standards was presented to Kevin Harris of Thorn Security, part of the Tyco "I am delighted to be able to recognise the significant contributions made by these five outstanding individuals and organisations" Group. Despite operating from his home and company base in Canada, Kevin has been an active member of the BSIA Security Equipment Manufacturers Section’s TC1 committee for several years, contributing to most of the Association’s guidance and standards comment reviews, as well as participating on various ad-hoc groups dealing with standards-related matters. Kevin supports the BSIA and BSI as the UK representative on CENELEC WG2 for intruder alarm component standards, and also the convenor of CENELEC’s WG13 for integrated security systems standards and WG9 for environmental compliance standards. As part of this duty, Kevin travels across Europe to the working group meetings and is ideally placed to update and advise our industry on matters of importance to the sector. Contribution to the community The award for Contribution to the Community was presented to the Tour of Securitas Team of Securitas Security Services (UK) Ltd. As part of this charitable initiative, over 800 security officers and support staff cycled 2,677 miles to raise awareness of safety in the workplace. The team raised more than £3,000 for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), an award-winning charity dedicated to the prevention of accidents on the road or in the workplace. Sponsored by Marks & Spencer, the scheme also received the backing of Team GB cycling legend, Shane Sutton.  Contribution to the industry The Chairman’s Award for Contribution to the Industry was awarded to David Ottewill, Managing Director of Camberford Law PLC, specialist insurance brokers to the security industry. Since taking over Camberford Law in 2007, David has sponsored the Security Personnel Awards every year, making it possible for the industry to recognise and reward the achievements of the many security officers who help to keep the UK’s infrastructure, businesses and members of the public safe and secure each and every day. Contribution to training The award for Contribution to Training was presented to security guarding company, VSG, for its Zero Assaults Project. The project, which is aimed at protecting members of the public and minimising criminal or reputational damage, has been delivered to 240 managers and directors since its launch last May. All in all, the success of the project is apparent, with the number of reportable conflict incidents across VSG having fallen by 23% and the number of lost time injuries decreasing by 42%. Such has been the project’s popularity that it has been rolled out across major contracts in London, while it now forms part of the mandatory VSG induction process. Contribution to exporting The Chairman’s Award for Contribution to Exporting was presented to Ron Archibald, Head of Trade Challenge Partners at UK Trade & Investment (UKTI). A career civil servant, Ron joined the Department of Trade and Industry in 1979 and "The actions of these winners have all served to promote our [private security] industry in a positive light" has since worked around the world securing EU free trade agreements with South Africa, Mexico and Chile, among others. For the last decade, Ron has headed the Tradeshow Access Programme, a major UKTI initiative providing support to UK businesses participating in around 400 overseas trade fairs each year. With the evolution to a new accreditation system for partner organisations, Ron, who had been closely involved in the accreditation process, has now taken on responsibility for the new Trade Challenge partner programme and is working with newly-accredited Partners to develop their partnerships with UKTI. As Deputy Director of UKTI’s Global Events and Missions change programme, Ron aims to transform the customer experience of UKTI-supported events by introducing a single events programme from Spring 2016, a role for which Ron’s extensive experience of the international events scene equips him very well. Commenting on the awards, BSIA Chairman, Pauline Norstrom said: “I am delighted to be able to recognise the significant contributions made by these five outstanding individuals and organisations, whose commitment and dedication have made a lasting impression on the UK’s private security industry. Whether organising charitable events or raising standards in the field of training, the actions of these winners have all served to promote our industry in a positive light, and I am pleased to be able to commend the impact they have made.”

BSIA representatives to share knowledge at IFSEC 2015
BSIA representatives to share knowledge at IFSEC 2015

Visitors to the show have three conference theatres to choose from this year: Keynote and Convergence, Security Solutions and Safe Cities As IFSEC International prepares to return to London’s ExCeL in June, a number of British Security Industry Association (BSIA) representatives are ready to impart advice on a number of industry issues – from city security to access control – as part of the show’s busy educational programme. Visitors to the show have three conference theatres to choose from this year: Keynote and Convergence, Security Solutions and Safe Cities. While UK-based security suppliers are anticipating another successful show as IFSEC returns to London for a second year, several BSIA spokespeople are set to share their knowledge on the following topics: Tuesday 16th June Cyber Security – Confronting Current and Future Threats 11:00, Keynote and Convergence Theatre Mike O’Neill, Managing Director, Optimal Risk Management Ltd and Chairman of the BSIA’s Specialist Services Section, is joined by Dan Solomon, Optimal Risk Management’s Director of Cyber Risk and Security Services, to discuss current and emerging cyber threats and the need for robust countermeasures. This session will also explore the importance of upskilling IT professionals to meet evolving cyber threats. Key Considerations when Choosing a Security Provider 13:00, Security Solutions Theatre Pauline Norstrom, Chief Operating Officer at AD Group Ltd and Chairman of the BSIA, discusses the importance of security market knowledge in the procurement process, answering the crucial question of what is more important, price or quality? Wednesday 17th June Access Control as a Service 11:00, Keynote and Convergence Theatre Paul Adams, Head of Technology and Product Management at BSIA Access Control member company, Kaba Ltd, explores the features and functionalities of Access Control as a Service (ACaaS), including the difference between hosted, managed and hybrid services. Paul will also address the common questions that arise for providers and adopters of ACaaS. The Police and Security Initiative: Collaboration to increase public safety 11:00, Safe Cities Academy Geoff Zeidler, Immediate Past Chair of the BSIA, introduces the Police and Security Initiative and the growing importance of partnerships between business, the police and the private security industry. This session looks at practical measures for improving working relationships, sharing good practice and reducing crime. The Surveillance Camera Code of Practice – Time for Voluntary Adoption? 13:00, Keynote and Convergence Theatre Surveillance Camera Commissioner, Tony Porter QPM LLB, will be joined by Simon Adcock, Managing Director of ATEC Security and Chairman of the BSIA’s CCTV Section, and Chairman of the BSIA, Pauline Norstrom, to discuss the implications of the Protection of Freedoms Act and the subsequent Surveillance Camera Commissioner’s Code of Practice on CCTV owners and operators.   CCTV Control Room Compliance 14:00, Security Solutions Theatre Dirk Wilson, Managing Director of Sector Security Services Ltd and Vice Chair of the BSIA’s Police and Public Services Section, introduces the latest updates and revisions to BS7958, the Code of Practice for CCTV management and operation. Providing recommendations on best practice in obtaining reliable information that might be offered as evidence, Dirk will also explore the increasing police and public confidence in the operation and management of CCTV. Security Risk Management Strategies for Safer Cities 15:00, Safe Cities Academy Mike O’Neill, Managing Director of Optimal Risk Management and Chairman of the BSIA’s Specialist Services Section, returns to explore the key risk management strategies that can be adopted to ensure maximum security in today’s increasingly technology-enabled cities. Thursday 18th June Supporting Safe Cities & Major Events – A Code of Practice for security searches 14:00, Safe Cities Academy Dirk Wilson, Managing Director of Sector Security Services Ltd and Vice Chair of the BSIA’s Police and Public Services Section, introduces a new Code of Practice for security searches, exploring lessons learned from the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and how these have been adopted by a new set of minimum standards for personnel carrying out security searches with the ultimate goal of ensuring greater police and public confidence in the private security sector and its ability to provide support at major events. Meanwhile, members of the BSIA are welcome to utilise the BSIA’s members’ lounge at IFSEC, free of charge. This can be found on the BSIA’s stand (B1350).

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