Security and Safety Things

Security and Safety Things GmbH (SAST) will demonstrate their open IoT platform for video surveillance cameras at the Global Security Exchange (GSX) in Chicago, September 10 to 12, 2019 at McCormick Place. The world's first open and standardised operating system with a global IoT marketplace will feature applications from more than 15 partner software developers running on security cameras from more than five camera manufacturers in an innovative, airport-themed booth at GSX.

"GSX is the ideal event for us to offer a sneak preview of our rapidly growing ecosystem, which includes camera manufacturers demonstrating prototype cameras with the SAST operating system,” said Hartmut Schaper, CEO of Security and Safety Things. “We’re particularly excited to present innovative AI applications as part of the SAST marketplace, ranging from real-time edge analytics to deep learning, using technology such as Microsoft Azure Cognitive Services.”

Video analytics improve store operations

15 partners to help increase security, optimise operations and improve customer experiences at airports"

The airport-themed booth will illustrate video analytics use cases in three core areas of an airport: The terminal, the boarding gate and the duty-free shops. The terminal section will feature a cross-domain use case together with Microsoft Azure Cognitive Services and Here Technologies, presenting how security and customer experience can be improved with deep learning.

The boarding gate section focuses on security and safety use cases, such as showcasing applications to detect abandoned luggage. In the duty-free store, partner developers will illustrate how video analytics help improve store operations and how neural network learning solutions improve the shopping experience of customers.

Camera analytics with mapping services

“Together with our partner Here Technologies, we will for the first time present cross-domain use cases, showcasing how travel journeys can be improved by integrating camera analytics data with mapping services,” said Nikolas Mangold-Takao, VP Product Management, Security and Safety Things.

"These benefits are part of our mission and that of our more than 15 developer partners to help increase security, optimise operations and improve the customer experiences at airports and many other industry verticals as well.” All applications will run on prototype cameras with SAST OS from members of the Open Security and Safety Alliance (OSSA).

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