Dallmeier DVS 800 IPS SEDOR video analysis server completes entry-level analysis portfolio
Dallmeier DVS 800 IPS SEDOR video analysis server completes entry-level analysis portfolio

The DVS 800 IPS completes Dallmeier's entry-level analysis portfolio. The video appliance supports the analysis of up to four IP video channels and the recording of up to eight IP video channels. The DVS 800 IPS is a compact and versatile SEDOR® video analysis server appliance. The proven platform of VideoNetBox® II is used as hardware. The SEDOR® Analysis Server software for analysis as well as the Smavia Recording Server software for recording are already installed ex works. The DVS 800 IPS supports the analysis of up to four IP video channels and the recording of up to eight IP video channels. Both the analysis and the recording software can be configured easily with a browser via Ethernet. The Smavia Viewing Client is available for evaluation of the recordings. In addition to the fast and intuitive display of live views the client software supports sophisticated navigation functions for playback, numerous search functions for metadata, the Dallmeier SmartFinder for finding of sequences with movements and PRemote-HD for transmission in narrowband networks. The analysis results can be output in real-time directly to the Smavia Viewing Client. In addition, they can be sent as a message in XML format or used for the control of external relays over Ethernet. They can also be output to the external management client PGuard advance. The results of counting applications can be represented graphically or in tabular form using the optional display and evaluation module SEDOR® DiViStic over Ethernet with a browser. The DVS 800 IPS has a compact housing and is perfectly suited for wall mountings.

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Dallmeier DVS 2200 IPS expands analysis portfolio
Dallmeier DVS 2200 IPS expands analysis portfolio

With the DVS 2200 IPS, Dallmeier is expanding its portfolio with regard to intelligent video analysis. The DVS 2200 IPS is a high-performance server appliance for the analysis of up to 12 IP video channels and the recording of up to 24 IP video channels. Both the analysis software (DVS Analysis Server) and the recording software (Smavia Recording Server) are already installed by the manufacturer and can be configured easily with a browser via Ethernet.The DVS 2200 IPS is based on the SEDOR® technology, a high-performance and self-learning video analysis technology which provides outstanding analytical results due to state-of-the-art image analysis algorithms and the constant adjustment of the system parameters to the current surrounding conditions (auto-adaptation). In conjunction with different analysis applications (Intruder, Object Counting, Art), the DVS 2200 IPS can serve a variety of surveillance and counting purposes. It is notable particularly for its outstanding flexibility: The licences for recording and analysis are independent of one another, so they can be adapted individually to the requirements of the respective situation. Analysis results can be output in real-time directly to the external management clients PGuard advance and SMAVIA Viewing Client. In addition, they can be sent as a message in XML format or used for the control of external relays over Ethernet. The results of counting applications can be represented graphically or in tabular form using the optional display and evaluation module SEDOR® DiViStic over Ethernet with a browser. The DVS 2200 IPS has a compact 1 RU housing and can be installed in a 19'' rack using the included mounting brackets.

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Video servers (IP transmission) - Expert commentary

Securing mobile vehicles: The cloud and solving transportation industry challenges
Securing mobile vehicles: The cloud and solving transportation industry challenges

Securing Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in the transportation industry is multi-faceted for a multitude of reasons. Pressures build for transit industry players to modernise their security systems, while also mitigating the vulnerabilities, risks, and growth-restrictions associated with proprietary as well as integrated solutions. There are the usual physical security obstacles when it comes to increasingly integrated solutions and retrofitting updated technologies into legacy systems. Starting with edge devices like cameras and intelligent sensors acquiring video, analytics and beyond, these edge devices are now found in almost all public transportation like buses, trains, subways, airplanes, cruise lines, and so much more. You can even find them in the world’s last manually operated cable car systems in San Francisco. The next layer to consider is the infrastructure and networks that support these edge devices and connect them to centralized monitoring stations or a VMS. Without this layer, all efforts at the edge or stations are in vain as you lose the connection between the two. And the final layer to consider when building a comprehensive transit solution is the software, recording devices, or viewing stations themselves that capture and report the video. The challenge of mobility However, the transportation industry in particular has a very unique challenge that many others do not – mobility. As other industries become more connected and integrated, they don’t usually have to consider going in and out or bouncing between networks as edge devices physically move. Obviously in the nature of transportation, this is key. Have you ever had a bad experience with your cellular, broadband or Wi-Fi at your home or office? You are not alone. The transportation industry in particular has a very unique challenge that many others do not – mobility Can you trust these same environments to record your surveillance video to the Cloud without losing any frames, non-stop 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year? To add to the complexity – how do you not only provide a reliable and secure solution when it’s mobile, travelling at varying speeds, and can be in/out of coverage using various wireless technologies? Waiting to upload video from a transport vehicle when it comes into port, the station, or any centralised location is a reactive approach that simply will not do any longer. Transit operations require a more proactive approach today and the ability to constantly know what is going on at any given time on their mobile vehicles, and escalate that information to headquarters, authorities, or law enforcement if needed; which can only occur with real-time monitoring. This is the ultimate question when it comes to collecting, analysing, and sharing data from mobile vehicles – how to get the video from public transportation vehicles alike to headquarters in real time! Managing video data In order to answer this question, let’s get back to basics. The management and nature of video data differs greatly from conventional (IT) data. Not only is video conducted of large frames, but there are specific and important relationships among the frames and the timing between them. This relationship can easily get lost in translation if not handled properly. This is why it’s critical to consider the proper way to transmit large frames while under unstable or variable networks. The Internet and its protocols were designed more than two decades ago and purposed for conventional data. Although the Internet itself has not changed, today’s network environments run a lot faster, expand to further ranges, and support a variety of different types of data. Because the internet is more reliable and affordable than in the past some might think it can handle anything. However, it is good for data, but not for video. This combination makes it the perfect time to convert video recording to the Cloud! Video transmission protocol One of the main issues with today’s technology is the degradation of video quality when transmitting video over the Internet. ITS are in dire need for reliable transmission of real-time video recording. To address this need a radical, yet proven, video transmission protocol has recently been introduced to the market. It uses AI technology and to adapt to different environments in order to always deliver high quality, complete video frames. This protocol, when equipped with encryption and authentication, enables video to be transmitted reliably and securely over the Internet in a cloud environment. One of the main issues with today’s technology is the degradation of video quality when transmitting video over the Internet Finally, transportation industry has a video recording Cloud solution that is designed for (massive) video that can handle networks that might be experiencing high error rate. Such a protocol will not only answer the current challenges of the transportation industry, but also make the previously risky Cloud environment safe for even the most reserved environments and entities. With revolutionary transmission protocols, the time is now to consider adopting private Cloud for your transportation operations.

Trends and challenges we will see in the AI-driven security space in 2021
Trends and challenges we will see in the AI-driven security space in 2021

For decades, the nature of global safety has been evolving. From physical security threats like large-scale terrorist attacks and lone actor stabbings to chemical threats such as the Salisbury poisonings and even microbiological threats such as COVID-19, new challenges are constantly arising and the threat landscape we operate in today is constantly changing. Compounding the complexity of the security issues is the complexity and nature of attacks. With the economic downturn, there is the traditional rise in theft, violence and other crimes. Compound this with unmanned businesses and work-at-home staff, and there is a perfect storm for a rise in security threats. Artificial intelligence (AI) and specifically the branch of AI known as machine learning (ML), was already causing widespread disruption in many industries, including the security industry. AI has been a driving force to replace labour-based business models with integrated data and actionable intelligence that is context-aware. It has become apparent that AI will play a big part in the ongoing fight against both pandemics such as COVID-19, as well as other threats that we may face in the future. With all of this in mind, 2021 is poised to be a big year for AI growth. While AI is going to continue to impact our lives in dozens of ways, from smart sensors to face mask compliance detection, the following reflects a few top trends and challenges that I have my eye on for 2021 as we close out this year. The rise of smart city investments One such example is the increasing development of smart cities and how AI can be leveraged to build safe communities. To date, we’ve seen an increase in the number of smart city programmes around the globe; cities that are beginning to deploy innovative technologies for the management and ease of life services. Compounding the complexity of the security issues is the complexity and nature of attacks Typical development of a city includes standard infrastructure - roads, schools, power, water, transportation. Now, internet, data and AI capabilities are part of the standard infrastructure requirements for all new developments. AI promises to deliver increased efficiencies with the infrastructure that will accommodate growing populations while reducing our impact on the environment, resources, and communities. Global cities now account for more than half of the world’s population, and the United Nations projects the number to balloon to 68% by mid-century. Owing to both demographic shifts and overall population growth, that means that around 2.5 billion people could be added to urban areas by the middle of the century, predicts the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA). With an increase in population has come an increase in global spending on smart city initiatives to drive down the impact of growing urban concentration. Global spending on smart city initiatives is expected to total nearly $124 billion this year, an increase of 18.9% over 2019, according to IDC's Worldwide Semiannual Smart Cities Spending Guide, while Singapore, Tokyo, London and New York as the big spenders - expected to spend more than $1 billion in 2020. Using AI-driven technology to create safer public and private spaces Today, security solutions driven by AI are being developed and can be covertly deployed across a range of physical environments to protect the population in a more efficient, and accurate manner. As we look ahead to the future of public safety, it’s clear that new AI technology can dramatically improve the effectiveness of today’s physical security space. One such deployment is the use of video object recognition/computer vision software that can be integrated into existing video monitoring security (VMS) systems. These enhanced VMS systems can be deployed both inside and outside of buildings to identify risks and flag threats, such weapons, aggressive behaviours, theft, and safety compliance. This helps to minimise the impact of a breach by an early alert to onsite security in real-time to the location and nature of the potential threat, allowing them to intervene before a loss occurs. These same AI-enabled video solutions can similarly be used to provide advanced business operations in retail, logistics, and manufacturing organisations. Multi-sensor security solutions Also, targeted magnetic and radar sensor technologies, concealed in everyday objects like planter boxes or inside walls, can now scan individuals and bags entering a building for concealed threat objects. Using AI/machine learning, these two sensor solutions combined can identify metal content on the body and bag and match the item to a catalogue of threat items, such as guns, rifles, knives and bombs. Security solutions driven by AI are being developed and can be covertly deployed across a range of physical environments Without this advanced multi-sensor solution, it becomes nearly impossible to discover a weapon on a person's body before it appears in an assailant’s hands. This multi-sensor solution allows for touchless, unobtrusive access to a building, but allows for immediate notification to onsite security when a concealed threat is detected. The hidden technology thus empowers security staff to intercept threats before they evolve into a wider scale attack, while also maintaining the privacy and civil liberties of the public, unless, of course, they are carrying a concealed weapon or pose a physical threat. With the advent of sophisticated surveillance and technological innovation, a level of caution must be exerted. Despite the ongoing global debate, there remains little regulation about the use of AI technologies in today’s physical security space. One thing is certain; it must be deployed in the right place, at the right time, with the right privacy and civil liberty protection objectives. People don’t want to be protected by omnipresent, obstructive and overbearing security systems that infringe on their privacy and civil liberties. They want a proper balance between security and their current way of life, one that must be fused together. Technology and tracing COVID-19 Machine learning-based technologies are playing a substantial role in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Traditionally, the key purpose of surveillance systems has been to detect and deter threats, including the detection of visible and hidden weapons and abnormal behaviour. While this, of course, remains a primary focus, today we are seeing how surveillance systems defend against new invisible threats, as well as rapidly automate the process of contact-tracing to capture and contain a virus before it spreads. Again, the ability to track and trace through parsing algorithms that can manage through enormous amounts of data provides a highly scalable and rapid response mechanism to control the spread of threats. AI has demonstrated potential for identifying those displaying symptoms of infectious diseases, without requiring physical human contact Although the threat may not be visible, it is just as destructive. By incorporating AI into existing technologies, government, healthcare and security professionals can monitor public spaces and environments through the combined use of digital and thermal video surveillance cameras and video management systems); just one of the solutions being explored. AI has demonstrated potential for identifying those displaying symptoms of infectious diseases, without requiring physical human contact. By Using AI-powered video analytic software, businesses can monitor face masks, social distancing and large gathering compliance and also detect elevated body temperature. Critically, technology must be capable of both identifying and tracking the virus but also be unobtrusive. An unobtrusive system that is adaptable enough to be deployed across a range of environments where the public gathers in enclosed spaces is necessary to be effective. Security in 2021 Technology has proven itself to be a valuable ally in times of crisis. For smart cities, the use of innovative AI/machine learning technologies will help optimise security solutions in areas that are brimming with potential. As we look ahead to the future of security in a world that is impacted by such a wide range of threats, from physical to chemical to microbiological, it’s clear that new technologies, specifically AI can dramatically improve the effectiveness of security systems and help us to better defend against a wide spectrum of threats. Technology has a huge role to play in making our communities safe in 2021 and beyond, but for security systems to be effective, they must not be oppressive or obstructive. This will ensure they have the full support of the public - the key to success.

7 steps to make VMS system design and installation easier
7 steps to make VMS system design and installation easier

For those of you old enough to remember, video matrix switchers were once the heyday of surveillance camera control. These cumbersome antiques were at the heart of every major video surveillance system (CCTV at the time) in premier gaming properties, government installations and corporate industrial complexes. They required more physical labour to construct and configure than perhaps the pyramids – maybe not – but you get the picture. And then digital video made its way in to the market and everything changed, transforming the physical demands for camera control and management from a hardware-centric to a software driven process. We’ve come a long way in a few short years, and the borders that once defined IT and security continue to diminish, if not disappear completely There’s no doubt that this migration also presented significant challenges as many security professionals often struggled with all things IT and software programming being one of the industry’s soft spots. Fortunately, we’ve come a long way in a few short years, and the borders that once defined IT and security continue to diminish, if not disappear completely. However, the complexities of today’s VMS functionality can be intimidating for anyone tasked with installing one of these systems given all of the user-defined options available from the simplest camera sequencing and bandwidth allocations to mobile management and enterprise level integration. This is where truly advanced VMS solutions need to shine on both the operations and the design/build sides of the equation. Smart VMS design There are more solutions products labelled “VMS solutions” out there than ever before. The issue is the fact that many of these “solutions” really don’t fall into the category of a true VMS by today’s standards but offer basic camera and NVR control. No doubt that there is a place for such software programs in the market. However, VMS solutions from the likes of OnSSI and other industry-leading companies offer distinct and superior management and control capabilities for demanding security and business intelligence applications. Perhaps of equal importance, these top-tier VMS solutions incorporate provisions for installers, so they have a clear and easier implementation path. OnSSI offers VMS solutions with smart camera drivers Here are seven attributes that can assist with the design and implementation of an advanced VMS solution: 1) Open architecture platform We need the ability to easily integrate with other systems and scale for future developments and physical system growth The ability to easily integrate with other systems and scale for future developments and physical system growth is largely dependent on a systems platform architecture. Here’s where VMS solutions with open architecture provide a distinct advantage. Open-architecture solutions expand functionality by facilitating greater integration between multiple systems and components. This not only makes VMS solutions with open architecture easier to implement, it makes them extremely cost-efficient by eliminating the need for proprietary solutions. Open architecture systems also provide adherence to industry standards such as ONVIF and PSIA, as well as compression formats such as H.265 and MJPEG, and help ensure system integration and support of an extensive range of manufacturers’ cameras and off-the-shelf hardware. Be wary of VMS solutions with limited camera manufacturer support. 2) Simple licensing processes and pricing Camera licenses and pricing is always a touchy subject, as any misunderstanding of a specific VMS solutions’ licensing terms can prove to be costly after the fact. And it often seems that some VMS suppliers have gone to great lengths to complicate the process as to obscure actual Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). Perhaps the most direct, simple and straightforward camera licensing and pricing method is to have one license per IP address used by each camera/encoder on multi-channel devices. These should be perpetual licenses with no required annual fees or subscriptions. Additionally, the licensing agreement should be all inclusive without added fees for multiple clients, failover servers, active directory support, I/O devices, redundant management servers, technical support or security patches and updates. 3) Mixing and matching camera license types The ability to mix and match different camera license types within the same system helps facilitate a seamless and simple migration of new and pre-existing systems with minimal downtime or interruption in operation. The ability to mix and match camera licenses not only saves valuable design and installation time, it can provide considerable savings when integrating large, multi-tenant systems. Mix and match capabilities also allow system designers to apply specific feature sets to specific groups of cameras to best leverage functionality and budgets, as well as providing the flexibility to implement an on-site, virtual, or cloud-based VMS solution, without any additional cost. 4) Auto camera detection and configuration Another VMS set-up feature that eases the install process is the ability to forego device registrations or MAC address requirements Another VMS set-up feature that eases the install process is the ability to forego device registrations or MAC address requirements. This functionality allows installers to instantly locate cameras on the network and configure them centrally so they can easily replace older cameras while seamlessly retaining video recorded from them. The auto detection capability should also include the ability to detect and import CSV files, which can then be stored and used to configure camera templates for future camera installation profiles. 5) Smart camera driver technology VMS solutions with smart camera drivers offer valuable assistance during system implementation, and any time new cameras are added to the network or replace older models. Manufacturer-specific smart camera drivers expand the range of model-specific static drivers. Instead of storing the device’s information (codecs, resolutions, frame rates, etc.) statically, a VMS with smart camera drivers queries devices for their capabilities using the manufacturers’ proprietary protocol. All that is required for configuration is that the camera is available on the network. Smart camera drivers eliminate the need to wait for model-specific drivers or installation of driver packs, allowing for newly released cameras to be used immediately. Network security is an area where leading VMS suppliers like OnSSI have ramped up development efforts to stay ahead of hackers  6) Importance of network security Network Security is perhaps the greatest challenge faced by industry professionals today Network security is perhaps the greatest challenge faced by industry professionals today. This is an area where leading VMS suppliers like OnSSI have ramped up development efforts to stay ahead of hackers. New security developments to look for include TLS 1.2 encryption protocols for camera-to-server communications (SSL 3.0 supported for older cameras), as well as server-to-server communications. Additional safeguards to consider include: randomised video databases with no camera identification information to secure recorded data; support for Active Directory authentication; AES encryption between servers and clients; and AES encrypted exporting. 7) Automatic updates Regardless of the supplier you select for your VMS solution, they should be consistently providing new updates and security patches on a frequent if not regular basis. Keeping up with these updates can be a burden and are often overlooked leading to system failures and breeches. Advanced VMS solutions now feature automatic update service checks on a system-wide basis, eliminating the need to manually update individual servers and devices. This ensures that your VMS system always has the latest drivers, fixes and updates which assures overall security while reducing TCO. So next time you’re getting a demo of the latest and greatest VMS solution, remember to ask what it offers in terms of design and implementation tools. Half the battle with new technologies is getting them installed and working properly. Without the right tools to accomplish these critical first steps, all the functionality in the world will do you little good.

Latest Dallmeier electronic GmbH & Co.KG news

Dallmeier announces the launch of GDPR-ready Picoline 5050 series ultracompact fixed dome and varifocal box cameras
Dallmeier announces the launch of GDPR-ready Picoline 5050 series ultracompact fixed dome and varifocal box cameras

The capabilities of miniature surveillance cameras are growing constantly - this is why for more than twelve years "the little ones" have also been among the most popular products made by the German manufacturer Dallmeier. With the new Dallmeier Picoline 5050 series, users in various industries can enjoy the benefits of a camera system which delivers 5 MP performance in an exceptionally compact format. Intelligent functions offer further added value. The cameras are available in in-ceiling mount, surface mounted and box housings. The external diameter of the surface-mounted variant is barely 93 mm. The number of customers who are looking for IP camera systems which combine value and durability with extensive functionality is increasing apace. Fixed focus lens The HDR function offers significantly more details in images with high dynamics than the classic digital WDR The cameras of Dallmeier's Picoline series are developed and manufactured entirely in Germany and are equipped with an H.265 decoder and a high-resolution image sensor with excellent light sensitivity. They are able to deliver detailed colour images with optimal memory and network efficiency even in low light conditions. The HDR function offers significantly more details in images with high dynamics than the classic digital WDR. Other special features include the combination of video analysis and search functions, the "SmartBackfill" technology to compensate for network outages without an extra SD card and fully automated, and a portfolio of features and functions for data protection and data security. The 5050 series dome cameras are available with compact, sturdy housing variants and have a fixed focus lens with a focal length of 2.5 mm. Image processing technology The in-ceiling variant is designed especially for discreet installation in suspended ceilings. Meanwhile, the surface-mounted variant can also be installed inconspicuously with a tiny footprint on ceilings or walls. Because of its particularly compact construction, the box version is also ideally suitable for discreet or unobtrusive installation (e.g., at cash machines) and in weather-proof housings for use outdoors. The 5050 series box camera is available in two variants, with a varifocal lens having a focal length of either 3 – 10 mm or 12 – 40 mm. The high resolution of the sensor and the sophisticated image processing technology enable image capturing in real time with a frame rate of 60fps (1080p/60) or up to 30 fps with a resolution of 4MP. The camera is thus ideally suited for applications that require the capture of very fast movements in high resolution. Advanced analysis functions The HDR function captures each image with two special settings which are combined in real time The HDR function captures each image with two special settings which are combined in real time to produce a well-balanced image that provides much greater detail in both bright and dark areas. The integrated real-time video analysis uses highly-advanced analysis functions such as Intrusion Detection or Line Crossing to detect movement and objects in the uncompressed image. When used with Dallmeier recording systems and client software, the "SmartFinder" function also enables semi-automated searching for events through the rapid analysis of stored objects and metadata. As ONVIF-compatible systems (Profile S and Profile T), the cameras can also be incorporated in many different third-party video management systems. Security gateway functions The camera is equipped with a RAM memory (Dallmeier "SmartBackfill" memory) which is activated in the event of a brief network outage (e.g., Spanning Tree, Bursts). The video stream is transmitted and then integrated automatically and seamlessly in the recording as soon as the connection is restored. The cameras of the Picoline series include comprehensive security features which can be adjusted flexibly to reflect the requirements of each customer. Like all Dallmeier systems, when used with Dallmeier software and recording systems the cameras of the new Picoline series also offer a full portfolio of data protection and data security functions - from privacy masking to authentication procedures, end-to-end encryption or security gateway functions. When used with third party systems, the cameras operate on the basis of the functions offered by those systems.

Dallmeier HEMISPHERE® module enables cost and revenue optimisation for local authorities
Dallmeier HEMISPHERE® module enables cost and revenue optimisation for local authorities

Permanent video observation is in place at busy traffic junctions in many towns. With the Traffic Enforcement Module on the Dallmeier HEMISPHERE® software platform, public authorities can now capture traffic incidents or offences quickly and simply with an easy-to-use software tool. A precisely definable and adaptable process enables users to evaluate and follow up on incidents efficiently with digital tools – while adhering to the evaluation and data protection regulations. Capture traffic violations Live video surveillance is already performed or under consideration at many car parking facilities and traffic junctions. With the Dallmeier HEMISPHERE® Traffic Enforcement Module, local authorities now have the capability to capture traffic violations and file video sequences of the offences efficiently within these existing surveillance systems. Cloud capability and compatibility The solution provides operators with a user-friendly function set that enables them to perform all of these tasks quickly and intuitively. Local authorities can thus optimise the process of investigating and punishing traffic violations, and so generate additional revenue. Users can implement the system with both Dallmeier cameras or with third-party systems. The HEMISPHERE® SeMSy® components can be operated either on-premise or in public cloud environments such as Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services (AWS) or Google Cloud Platform. Accurate logging during capture If an operator observes a traffic offence, he can start the recording of the camera live stream immediately. For this purpose, the app features a control centre on a time bar for starting, stopping and cancelling recordings. Backup of the recording is made automatically in the background and can be cancelled if an offence has not taken place After a recording has been stopped again, a backup of the recording is made automatically in the background, and it is saved to an archive together with a timestamp, the name of the camera and the name of the operator. Recordings can be cancelled if an offence has not taken place. For this, the operator must provide a reason either from a dropdown list or in free text. Depending on the requirements applied to a system, selection options with subsequent text input fields can be configured individually. At the same time, all user actions are logged in full. Optimised workflows Besides the actual recording and saving routines, the system also maps the process for follow-up processing of incidents: First, all recorded offences are listed in the module in a chronological overview. Users can filter and search the list by ID, user, violation code, camera name, vehicle registration number, date and time, and processing status. In a processing mode, they can review the items and decide whether a traffic offence has been committed and should be reported. For this purpose, they are then able to access the recording or the offence, additional information or snapshots from the recording, and the exact location of the incident on a map section. Predefined justification If an item is not processed further, because it is evident that an offence has not taken place, this must be confirmed with a predefined justification. All offences which are reported must be collected in detail in a log for subsequent investigation and review. The list can be filtered by data and exported to a PDF file. Additional benefits "Many towns implement video observation systems at busy traffic junctions. With our solution, these systems are given very valuable additional benefits, whereby besides improving safety they also help to relieve the strain on municipal budgets," according to Dieter Dallmeier, Founder and CEO, Dallmeier electronic. "The Dallmeier solution enables the operators to secure evidence for traffic offences intuitively and with maximum efficiency with very low training costs. The subsequent evaluation and forwarding process guarantees compliance and data protection, and all processes are logged in detail."

Dallmeier deploys Panomera multifocal-sensor system to secure Gazprom Arena prior to 2021 Euro Football Championship
Dallmeier deploys Panomera multifocal-sensor system to secure Gazprom Arena prior to 2021 Euro Football Championship

Since its completion in 2017, the Gazprom Arena has served as the home ground stadium for the Russian football club Zenit St. Petersburg. And as one of the host stadiums for the 2018 FIFA World Cup and the 2021 Euro Football Championship, the Gazprom Arena must also satisfy the strict security regulations of FIFA, UEFA and ESSMA. When selecting the video security system, the managers responsible at Zenit therefore opted for a solution from the German manufacturer Dallmeier. With its patented Panomera multifocal-sensor system, Dallmeier guarantees the security of many stadiums all over the world. The objective was providing coverage with video security technology for the entire area surrounding the stadium, the entrance gate approaches, the rooms below grand stands, and the grand stands themselves in one of the largest video security projects ever undertaken in a football stadium. Video security system Under enormous time pressure, a high-performance system had to be implemented in the stadium with a capacity of 60,000 fans and yet had to remain adaptable and flexible in response to changing customer wishes as the project progressed. One requirement which from time to time presented the greatest challenge was capturing all areas of all the grand stands all of the time, so that unequivocal identification of offenders could be assured in all circumstances. In order to achieve this, the Russian Interior Ministry stipulated two key requirements for the video security system: Firstly, it must capture the entire grand stand area with a "minimum resolution density" of 250 pixels per metre (px/m). This also corresponds to the performance criterion defined in the globally valid standard DIN EN 62676-4 for video security systems for purposes of enabling identification of an unknown person. Minimum resolution density A Dallmeier video security system has already been operating in the Petrovsky Stadium since 2012 And secondly, the image frequency must not fall below a frame rate of 25 frames per second (fps). Because it is typically only the combination of the specified minimum resolution density and a fluid representation of events that can ensure incontestable evidence that is usable in a court of law. In order to meet these stringent requirements, the security managers invited a number of vendors to present their solutions in advance at Zenit's former home ground - the Petrovsky Stadium - to enable them to choose the right solution for the Gazprom Arena. A Dallmeier video security system has already been operating in the Petrovsky Stadium since 2012, and after a thorough evaluation of all the solutions, the operators decided to install a stadium solution from Dallmeier in the Gazprom Arena as well. Multifocal-sensor system Because compared with conventional camera technologies such as megapixel or PTZ cameras for example, the patented Panomera multifocal-sensor system from Dallmeier can guarantee coverage of even the largest expanses with the stipulated minimum resolution density and frame rate. And Panomera systems continuously capture everything that is happening in full resolution and allow high-resolution zooms - both live and in the recording and by several operators at the same time. This enables stadium operators to track and reconstruct relevant occurrences in detail both live and after the fact. Besides the technical superiority of the Panomera technology, another decisive advantage of the Dallmeier stadium solution was the innovative 3D planning approach, with which a digital reproduction of the Gazprom Arena was created. Conventional single-sensor cameras This makes it very easy to fulfil the requirement according to which at least 250 px/m must be assured literally "in every last corner": colour coding in the 3D simulation makes it possible to see exactly where the value has been reached and where a correction should be made, perhaps by setting up in a another position or using a different camera model. An alternative solution would have required a substantial four-figure number of conventional single-sensor cameras A further major advantage of this planning approach is the extreme efficiency of the solution: For example, Zenit St. Petersburg is able to provide security on the terraces throughout the Gazprom Arena with way less than 100 Panomera camera systems, covering all areas with at least 250 px/m and 25 fps. An alternative solution would have required a substantial four-figure number of conventional single-sensor cameras. Minimises uncertainty factors Apart from enormously high infrastructure costs (masts, cables, etc.) this would also have generated a practically unmanageable deluge of images for the video system operators. Another benefit of Dallmeier's 3D planning programme is the automatic generation of "CamCards" - exact configuration documents for every single camera. Armed with this information, installers on site know exactly which camera must be mounted where, how high and at what angle. The big advantage besides the immense amount of time saved consists in the planning reliability: It can be predicted with great accuracy how much labour the installation of the total solution with entail, because this approach minimises uncertainty factors. Total storage capacity Thanks to Dallmeier's unwavering assistance throughout the project, testing by the state technical personnel in Russia was also successful in the subsequent project phases, with the result that the stadium operators were able to begin operating the video security system after final project commissioning in good time for the 2018 FIFA World Cup. The total storage capacity for the video security system amounts to more than six petabytes Recently, over 1,000 single-sensor cameras have been installed in the Gazprom Arena in addition to the Panomera systems - these safeguard the remaining areas of the stadium. Due to the large number of cameras, the total storage capacity for the video security system amounts to more than six petabytes (equivalent to about 6,000 TB). High-performance recording appliances from Dallmeier are used to process this information. Largest stadium project Authorised personnel from various departments and stakeholders can access the system at 80 workstations. The video security system from Dallmeier has provided ample evidence of its performance capabilities and reliability in the running of the Gazprom Arena, not least during the seven matches of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. On this subject, Karlheinz Biersack, Director Sales Eastern Europe/RUS/GUS at Dallmeier explains: "Of course we were delighted that the security managers of Zenit St. Petersburg also decided to rely on Dallmeier again for their new home, the Gazprom Arena. This success in the largest stadium project we have ever undertaken shows once again that Dallmeier's holistic security and solution approach - above all the patented Panomera technology and our unrivalled project and consulting services represent an immense benefit for our customers."

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