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7 steps to make VMS system design and installation easier
7 steps to make VMS system design and installation easier

For those of you old enough to remember, video matrix switchers were once the heyday of surveillance camera control. These cumbersome antiques were at the heart of every major video surveillance system (CCTV at the time) in premier gaming properties, government installations and corporate industrial complexes. They required more physical labour to construct and configure than perhaps the pyramids – maybe not – but you get the picture. And then digital video made its way in to the market and everything changed, transforming the physical demands for camera control and management from a hardware-centric to a software driven process. We’ve come a long way in a few short years, and the borders that once defined IT and security continue to diminish, if not disappear completely There’s no doubt that this migration also presented significant challenges as many security professionals often struggled with all things IT and software programming being one of the industry’s soft spots. Fortunately, we’ve come a long way in a few short years, and the borders that once defined IT and security continue to diminish, if not disappear completely. However, the complexities of today’s VMS functionality can be intimidating for anyone tasked with installing one of these systems given all of the user-defined options available from the simplest camera sequencing and bandwidth allocations to mobile management and enterprise level integration. This is where truly advanced VMS solutions need to shine on both the operations and the design/build sides of the equation. Smart VMS design There are more solutions products labelled “VMS solutions” out there than ever before. The issue is the fact that many of these “solutions” really don’t fall into the category of a true VMS by today’s standards but offer basic camera and NVR control. No doubt that there is a place for such software programs in the market. However, VMS solutions from the likes of OnSSI and other industry-leading companies offer distinct and superior management and control capabilities for demanding security and business intelligence applications. Perhaps of equal importance, these top-tier VMS solutions incorporate provisions for installers, so they have a clear and easier implementation path. OnSSI offers VMS solutions with smart camera drivers Here are seven attributes that can assist with the design and implementation of an advanced VMS solution: 1) Open architecture platform We need the ability to easily integrate with other systems and scale for future developments and physical system growth The ability to easily integrate with other systems and scale for future developments and physical system growth is largely dependent on a systems platform architecture. Here’s where VMS solutions with open architecture provide a distinct advantage. Open-architecture solutions expand functionality by facilitating greater integration between multiple systems and components. This not only makes VMS solutions with open architecture easier to implement, it makes them extremely cost-efficient by eliminating the need for proprietary solutions. Open architecture systems also provide adherence to industry standards such as ONVIF and PSIA, as well as compression formats such as H.265 and MJPEG, and help ensure system integration and support of an extensive range of manufacturers’ cameras and off-the-shelf hardware. Be wary of VMS solutions with limited camera manufacturer support. 2) Simple licensing processes and pricing Camera licenses and pricing is always a touchy subject, as any misunderstanding of a specific VMS solutions’ licensing terms can prove to be costly after the fact. And it often seems that some VMS suppliers have gone to great lengths to complicate the process as to obscure actual Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). Perhaps the most direct, simple and straightforward camera licensing and pricing method is to have one license per IP address used by each camera/encoder on multi-channel devices. These should be perpetual licenses with no required annual fees or subscriptions. Additionally, the licensing agreement should be all inclusive without added fees for multiple clients, failover servers, active directory support, I/O devices, redundant management servers, technical support or security patches and updates. 3) Mixing and matching camera license types The ability to mix and match different camera license types within the same system helps facilitate a seamless and simple migration of new and pre-existing systems with minimal downtime or interruption in operation. The ability to mix and match camera licenses not only saves valuable design and installation time, it can provide considerable savings when integrating large, multi-tenant systems. Mix and match capabilities also allow system designers to apply specific feature sets to specific groups of cameras to best leverage functionality and budgets, as well as providing the flexibility to implement an on-site, virtual, or cloud-based VMS solution, without any additional cost. 4) Auto camera detection and configuration Another VMS set-up feature that eases the install process is the ability to forego device registrations or MAC address requirements Another VMS set-up feature that eases the install process is the ability to forego device registrations or MAC address requirements. This functionality allows installers to instantly locate cameras on the network and configure them centrally so they can easily replace older cameras while seamlessly retaining video recorded from them. The auto detection capability should also include the ability to detect and import CSV files, which can then be stored and used to configure camera templates for future camera installation profiles. 5) Smart camera driver technology VMS solutions with smart camera drivers offer valuable assistance during system implementation, and any time new cameras are added to the network or replace older models. Manufacturer-specific smart camera drivers expand the range of model-specific static drivers. Instead of storing the device’s information (codecs, resolutions, frame rates, etc.) statically, a VMS with smart camera drivers queries devices for their capabilities using the manufacturers’ proprietary protocol. All that is required for configuration is that the camera is available on the network. Smart camera drivers eliminate the need to wait for model-specific drivers or installation of driver packs, allowing for newly released cameras to be used immediately. Network security is an area where leading VMS suppliers like OnSSI have ramped up development efforts to stay ahead of hackers  6) Importance of network security Network Security is perhaps the greatest challenge faced by industry professionals today Network security is perhaps the greatest challenge faced by industry professionals today. This is an area where leading VMS suppliers like OnSSI have ramped up development efforts to stay ahead of hackers. New security developments to look for include TLS 1.2 encryption protocols for camera-to-server communications (SSL 3.0 supported for older cameras), as well as server-to-server communications. Additional safeguards to consider include: randomised video databases with no camera identification information to secure recorded data; support for Active Directory authentication; AES encryption between servers and clients; and AES encrypted exporting. 7) Automatic updates Regardless of the supplier you select for your VMS solution, they should be consistently providing new updates and security patches on a frequent if not regular basis. Keeping up with these updates can be a burden and are often overlooked leading to system failures and breeches. Advanced VMS solutions now feature automatic update service checks on a system-wide basis, eliminating the need to manually update individual servers and devices. This ensures that your VMS system always has the latest drivers, fixes and updates which assures overall security while reducing TCO. So next time you’re getting a demo of the latest and greatest VMS solution, remember to ask what it offers in terms of design and implementation tools. Half the battle with new technologies is getting them installed and working properly. Without the right tools to accomplish these critical first steps, all the functionality in the world will do you little good.

Video technology reimagined with the empowerment of IoT
Video technology reimagined with the empowerment of IoT

It amazes me how in a few short years security systems have gone from simple, dumb cameras witnessing events to intelligent eyes, ears, speech and touch solutions that boost situational awareness far beyond human capabilities. It seems the only senses missing from the equation now are smell and taste. And who knows, someone might be working on those in a lab somewhere right now. But what’s really fascinating to me is how the Internet of Things (IoT) has opened a world of possibilities for transforming security technology into something new yet again. With IoT we’re able to push and pull nuggets of intelligence from sources we never considered before: environmental sensors, pressure plates, door lock timers and much more. It’s helped us break through the constraining mindset that security systems are strictly single-purpose. With interconnectivity at the core, we’re starting to imagine myriad ways to apply these tools to challenges outside the realm of security. Here are just a few examples. Flood management assistance Network camera adds another dimension and timeliness to flood management by helping responders investigate remotely As recent hurricanes and floods have shown, water damage can be devastating to a community. That’s why some municipalities are using their city surveillance cameras in conjunction with water sensor to proactively address the problem. Water sensors collect data from multiple sources such as rain gutters, sewer systems and pump stations, in order to monitor fluctuations in water levels and water quality. If an alert triggers, having a network camera in proximity to visually verify the situation helps responders determine the best course of action. For instance, if multiple water detection sensors trigger alerts simultaneously or sequentially over a large area it’s probably due to natural runoff from recent rainfall. But without eyes on the scene, how can you be sure? Network camera adds another dimension and timeliness to flood management by helping responders investigate and identify the cause of a trigger remotely. It might be a fire hydrant spewing water, a water main break or even a chemical spill. With video streaming live to the command center, staff can remotely inspect the area, determine the cause of the trigger and decide whether remediation is required, thus avoiding the expense of dispatching an investigative crew to a non-event. Some municipalities are using their city surveillance cameras in conjunction with water sensor to proactively address the problem Environmental control assistance Data centers house the lifeblood of a business so it’s no wonder why companies work hard to protect them. We’re all familiar with the integration of network cameras with access control systems to visually verify who is actually using the credentials. Network camera adds another dimension and timeliness to flood management by helping responders investigate and identify the cause of a trigger remotely But there’s another aspect to protecting data centers and that’s environment control. Data centers need to maintain optimum humidity and temperature for the racks of electronics. When environmental sensors in the facility detect out-of-norm ranges technicians can remotely command a network camera to zoom in on the gauges and help them determine whether remediation might be necessary.  Coupling network cameras with other sensors in the data center can provide visual confirmation of other conditions as well. For instance, every time a data rack door-open-close sensor detects an event it can trigger the camera to pan to the location and stream video to security. Some data centers employ weight sensors at the doorway to weigh personnel and equipment as they enter the room and when they exit to ensure no additional hardware is being taken out of the facility or left inside without permission. Any discrepancy would trigger the camera to zoom in for a close-up of the individual’s face and send a visual alert and ID information to security. Roadway management and parking assistance Network cameras have long played a part in city-wide traffic management. Adding video analytics and integration with network sensors, makes those cameras that much smarter and versatile. They can detect cars driving in bike lanes or driving in the wrong direction and capture license plates of offenders. Their ability to detect anomalous traffic flow patterns can be integrated with car counting sensors, networked electronic road signs and traffic light systems to automatically redirect vehicles to alternate routes. They make great, intelligent parking lot attendants, too. Working in conjunction with weight sensors network cameras can count vehicles coming into and leaving a lot or garage and verify when the facility has reached capacity. License plate recognition and video analytics can be used to ascertain that a vehicle entering a reserved parking space doesn’t match the credentials and vehicle attributes in the database. With the addition of noise sensors and audio analytics, network cameras can improve roadway and parking facility safety by detecting and identifying specific sounds – breaking glass, car alarms, gun shots, and aggressive speech – and triggering a visual alert to first responders. Network cameras can improve roadway and parking facility safety by detecting and identifying specific sounds and triggering a visual alert to first responders Shopper experience assistance In the early days of online shopping, e-tailers designed their sites to replicate the in-store customer experience. In an ironic turn of events, today brick-and-mortar stores are trying to mirror the online shopping experience. To do so, they’re turning their security systems into adjunct sales assistance. With network video and audio system automation they can recognise and acknowledge loyal customers with personal greetings. Retailers are applying people counting video analytics to checkout activity to create rules-based consistency in customer service With heatmapping analytics they can measure how much time a customer spends in a specific department or observe how they walk through the aisles of the store. They can track shopping behaviors such as items looked at that made it into the cart or didn’t, or whether a customer actually checked out or left the merchandise behind. By capturing these shopping patterns and trends retailers can shape a more positive, more profitable customer shopping experience. For instance, integrating video analytics with point of sale systems and RFID sensors on merchandise tags can result in timely alerts to sales associates to recommend additional merchandise. This is a case of emulating how e-tailers let the customer know that other customers who bought X often also purchased items Y and Z. Or to avoid disappointing customers due to stock outages, retailers are linking weight sensors and video analytics to make sure their shelves are well-stocked and if not, quickly alert associates to what items need to be restocked. Capturing business intelligence Retailers are also using video cameras to monitor checkout queues and trigger automated announcements over the public-address system, closed system such as smartphones or other wireless communications devices that checkers are needed rather wait for a person to call for backup. IoT laid the groundwork for network security solutions to seamlessly integrate with other IP-based technologies, sensors and programs They’re applying people counting video analytics to checkout activity to create rules-based consistency in customer service. While retailers will always use their surveillance camera for loss prevention, they’re finding that integrating traditional technology in new ways can yield even bigger returns. Linking network video surveillance, video analytics, network communications system and sensors with point-of-sale systems and customer loyalty databases, retailers are capturing the business intelligence they need to get back in the game and make brick-and-mortar a greater overall experience than online shopping. A natural cross-over technology This trend towards integration has forever changed how organisations view their investment in security technology. The intelligence and versatility of a tool that can see, verify and analyse what’s happening in real-time is spurring users to tap its cross-over potential for a host of other tasks that could benefit from more astute situational awareness – everything from manufacturing and equipment maintenance to logistics, inventory control and beyond. IoT laid the groundwork for network security solutions to seamlessly integrate with other IP-based technologies, sensors and programs. How we capitalise on that connection is only limited by our imagination.

Top ten security industry mergers and acquisitions of 2018
Top ten security industry mergers and acquisitions of 2018

Consolidation persisted in the physical security industry in 2018, and big companies such as Motorola, Canon and UTC continued to make moves. Also among the mergers and acquisitions (M&A) news in 2018 was a high-profile bankruptcy (that ended well), continuing consolidation in the integrator market, and the creation of a new entity called “LenelS2.” Here’s a look at the Top 10 M&A stories in 2018: 1. Motorola acquires Avigilon Motorola Solutions announced in February that it had entered into a definitive agreement to acquire video surveillance provider Avigilon in an all-cash transaction that enhances Motorola Solutions’ portfolio of mission-critical communications technologies. Avigilon products are used by a range of commercial and government customers including critical infrastructure, airports, government facilities, public venues, healthcare centers and retail. The company holds more than 750 U.S. and international patents. 2. UTC Climate, Control & Security buys S2 Security UTC Climate, Controls & Security agreed in September to acquire S2 Security, a developer of unified security and video management solutions. UTC subsequently combined S2 with its Lenel brand to create LenelS2, “a global leader in advanced access control systems and services” with “complementary strengths.” 3. Costar Technologies acquires Arecont Vision after bankruptcy Arecont Vision, the provider of IP-based megapixel camera and video surveillance solutions, announced in July that the acquisition by Costar Technologies, Inc. of its assets had been approved by the bankruptcy court. After the closing of the sale, the company began operating as Arecont Vision Costar, LLC and is part of Costar, a U.S. corporation that designs, develops, manufactures, and distributes a range of products for the video surveillance and machine vision markets. 4. Allegion acquires access control company ISONAS Allegion plc, a security products and solutions provider, agreed in June to acquire ISONAS through one of its subsidiaries. ISONAS’ edge-computing technology provides access control solutions for non-residential markets. ISONAS' devices – like its integrated reader-controllers – utilise power over ethernet, making them easy to install and cost effective as they utilise existing customer infrastructures. The company is based in Boulder, Colo. 5. HID buys Crossmatch for Biometrics HID Global announced that it had acquired Crossmatch, a provider of biometric identity management and secure authentication solutions, from Francisco Partners. Crossmatch’s portfolio of products includes biometric identity management hardware and software that complement HID’s broad portfolio of trusted identity products and services. 6. BriefCam announces acquisition by Canon BriefCam, a global provider of video synopsis and deep learning solutions, announced its acquisition in May by Canon Inc., a global digital imaging solutions company. The addition of BriefCam to Canon’s network video solutions products portfolio complements the Canon Group’s previous acquisitions of Axis Communications and Milestone Systems. 7. Allied Universal acquires U.S. Security Associates Allied Universal, a security and facility services company, finalised its acquisition of U.S. Security Associates (USSA) in October, further building on its position in the security services industry. This acquisition includes Andrews International (including its Government Services Division and Consulting and Investigations and International Division) and Staff Pro. 8. Johnson Controls acquires Smartvue Corp. Johnson Controls announced in April that it had acquired Smartvue, a global IoT and video provider that empowers cloud video surveillance and IoT video services. The addition of the Smartvue cloud-based video platform will enhance Johnson Controls’ offering of an end-to-end, smart cloud-based solution that can provide superior business data and intelligence to customers and added value to partners. 9. ADT acquires Red Hawk Fire & Security (and others) ADT Inc.’s acquisition of Red Hawk Fire & Security, Boca Raton, Fla., was the latest move in ADT Commercial’s strategy to buy up security integrator firms around the country and grow their footprint. In addition to the Red Hawk acquisition, announced in mid-October, ADT has acquired more than a half-dozen security system integration firms in the last year or so. 10. Convergint Technologies continues to acquire Convergint Technologies announced in August the acquisition of New Jersey-based Access Control Technologies (ACT), bringing further electronic security systems experience to Convergint's service capabilities. Convergint has strategically grown its service footprint across the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia Pacific through strong organic growth and the completion of 18 acquisitions since early 2016. And it continues: Convergint announced acquisition of SI Technologies, Albany, N.Y., in November and Firstline Security Integration (FSI), Anaheim, Calif., in December. (And Convergint itself was acquired in February by private equity group Ares Management.)

Latest Promise Technology news

Promise Technology in partnership with ComTech enhances security storage infrastructure at the DWR
Promise Technology in partnership with ComTech enhances security storage infrastructure at the DWR

A county water resources department (DWR), which services the water and sewage needs of almost a million residents in the county and neighbouring communities, was looking to install several hundreds of surveillance cameras at the large water treatment plant, as well as several remote locations/plants under their management.  Although they already had an existing solution, it involved complex integration of multiple hardware and software solutions for storage and networking in conjunction with OnSSI VMS and multiple cameras, the DWR was looking for a cost-e­ffective replacement solution that would simplify the management of the existing system, and since the number of cameras at each treatment plant is expected to grow exponentially, the scalability of the new solution was also a very important consideration. VSkyCube Hyperconverged Infrastructure Solution Initial deployment of VSkyCube consists of a 3 x s200 cluster, supporting 40 IP cameras and 40TB of storagePromise, in conjunction with their partner ComTech, who took responsibility for management, setup and maintenance of the solution, o­ffered the DWR their VSkyCube Hyperconverged Infrastructure Solution as a replacement and enhancement for their existing security storage infrastructure. Initial deployment of VSkyCube consists of a 3 x s200 cluster, supporting 40 IP cameras and 40TB of storage. The DWR’s high-end surveillance solution provides: Pre-integrated nodes that can be rapidly deployed and scaled for future deployments. VSkyCube software-defined approach allows ComTech to deploy and launch surveillance services with just a few clicks. A cost-e­ffective, fully redundant platform for running their existing OnSSI video management, as well as secure storage for sensitive security video. Simple, powerful, centralised management with VSkyView allows the DWR personnel to manage, monitor, scale and adjust compute, storage and networking resources from a single pane-of-glass interface. Ability to scale and evolve to handle higher resolutions and additional cameras by simply adding additional VSky nodes for more storage or processing power. A crucial element, given the department’s expansion goals of more than 700 cameras in the near future. Vess A3340 with 16-port PoE solutions Easily scalable and flexible solution provides the capability to expand to add additional cameras, upgrade cameras to higher resolutionsVSkyCube pre-integrates computing, storage, and networking into hyperconverged nodes, specifically optimised for video surveillance workloads and brings the benefits of the hyper-scale datacentre to the county. All these advantages allowed the DWR to focus on the security, not the infrastructure. The partnership with ComTech also resulted in installation of Vess A3340 with integrated 16-port PoE solutions, perfect for ‘all-in-one’ surveillance needs at smaller-scale sites, providing an aff­ordable solution while still being capable of expanding as the number of cameras grows. Other departments within the county had diff­erent surveillance requirements that were met by the Vess A6120. Results and benefits of the solution Cost-efficient solution eliminated the need for expensive discrete storage and networking. Replacement with hyperconverged node means Promise can provide high-quality support across the full scope of installations. Easily scalable and flexible solution provides the capability to expand to add additional cameras, upgrade cameras to higher resolutions, or increase retention times. The solution is anticipated to scale to 700+ cameras in the near future. High resilience and high availability features increased security of county surveillance operations, ensuring important video footage is captured and retained. Simple management and monitoring solution reduces overhead while enhancing operations and increasing flexibility. Solution can be readily applied by ComTech to future surveillance installations.

Promise Technology’s VTrak A-Class turnkey SAN file system solutions to include axle Starter software
Promise Technology’s VTrak A-Class turnkey SAN file system solutions to include axle Starter software

Promise Technology Inc., a storage solutions provider for creative and IT applications, announced that its VTrak A-Class turnkey SAN file system solutions will now include bundled axle Starter software. By providing browser-based access to every video, audio and still image file, axle’s Starter software gives VTrak A-Class users the ability to easily manage their rich media projects from any computer on the network. Promise’s VTrak A-Class is ideal for multi-user collaboration to ingest, edit, stream, and process rich media. A true ‘all-in-one solution in a box’ RAID storage subsystem, the VTrak A-Class features an integrated metadata appliance and embedded file system for big data, along with an optional NAS gateway. Ease of use and low ownership cost “Promise’s VTrak A-Class solutions are known for their low total cost of ownership, simplicity of deployment, ease of use and incredible performance,” noted Vijay Char, president, Promise Technology USA. “By including axle’s highly regarded asset management software, we’re bringing more value to our end-users, fostering more efficient collaboration and accelerating rich media workflows among creative teams of all sizes.” Promise’s VTrak A-Class solutions are known for their low total cost of ownership, simplicity of deployment, ease of use"axle’s Starter software includes the ability to catalogue up to 300,000 assets (axle’s larger configurations now support over 2 million assets) and support 2 users. This configuration can be upgraded by adding user accounts or functional modules, such as axle’s new axle ai visual search technology, axle’s Advanced Transcode option, archive integrations for Archiware P5 and XenData, and ingest integrations with Softron, Cinedeck and MOG. Other benefits include: Create proxies of media for faster and easier handling View, tag, search, share, and organise content quickly and easily Easily get media from axle to Adobe Premiere Pro CC and/or Apple Final Cut Pro X without needing to move media around Thunderbolt and Fibre Channel storage According to Sam Bogoch, CEO of axle Video, “We are thrilled to be working with Promise, a longtime leader in storage for creative applications. Their pioneering work and great track record in Thunderbolt and Fibre Channel storage, as well as the power of their new VTrak A-Class solutions, make them an ideal partner for us as we continue on our mission to make browser-based search radically simple.” A webinar highlighting the combined power of Promise’s VTrak A-Class and axle’s Starter software will be held on Wednesday, November 8 at 1 p.m. EST/10 a.m. PST. Key product managers from Promise and axle will lead the discussion, which will include workflow demonstrations and a question and answer session.

Dispatches from Security Essen 2018: New layout, artificial intelligence and GDPR
Dispatches from Security Essen 2018: New layout, artificial intelligence and GDPR

Security Essen 2018, held in Messe Essen, Germany, promised attendees a newly modernised trade show with a simplified layout and more interactive experience. Compared to previous years, halls were reorganised by technology area, with aisles laid out to make more direct pathways for attendees. The fair welcomed 950 exhibitors and more than 36,000 trade visitors from the global security market. Several manufacturers mentioned that footfall had been lighter than expected, but that the show had delivered on its promise to welcome more international visitors, in particular from the Middle East region. Exhibitors also grumbled about higher costs for booth space. Key security industry exhibitors Exhibitors expressed concern that the absence of key players reduced overall foot traffic Exhibitors praised the bigger aisles, which made it easier for visitors to navigate the show. However, some were unsure whether this was due to a better layout or simply because the show was missing key exhibitors. Notably absent were access control provider Dormakaba, security solutions company Honeywell, and surveillance providers Geutebruck and Dallmeier. Exhibitors expressed concern that the absence of key players reduced overall foot traffic. Security Essen hosted a particularly strong access control presence. Halls 2 and 3 were home to companies from across the access control and mechatronics spectrum. Sponsorship by EVVA covered the west entrance. The locking systems manufacturer, which celebrates its 100th anniversary next year, boasted significant floorspace. Exhibitors were pleased with the large access and locking presence, commenting that London-based IFSEC International tends to be dominated by video surveillance providers. EVVA, which celebrates its 100th anniversary next year, boasted significant floorspace Deep learning and artificial intelligence The push toward artificial intelligence (AI) in physical security continues, although the tone at Security Essen seemed to be shifting beyond hype and more toward how the technology can actually add value. For example, Hikvision’s cameras boasted more intelligence and processing power, and the company emphasised faster-paced product cycles. Customers ultimately do not buy AI – they buy benefits and solutions VIVOTEK embraced artificial intelligence as the biggest trend in the industry. The company demonstrated its latest deep learning technology for crowd detection applications. For Dahua, artificial intelligence allows users to easily search metadata in a video, including age and behaviour. Dahua demonstrated its solution for the transportation market, which is able to learn if a bus or train driver is falling asleep at the controls. However, some manufacturers chose not to focus on artificial intelligence. Representatives from Brivo and Eagle Eye Networks highlighted that customers ultimately do not buy AI – they buy benefits and solutions. Historically, video analytics were oversold and underdelivered, and the same could happen to AI if the term is overused in marketing security solutions. VIVOTEK embraced artificial intelligence as the biggest trend in the industry The German market & GDPR While the fair welcomed an increase in international visitors, many stands offered a distinctly German flavour. Exhibitors catered to German customers’ preference for data protection and high levels of privacy. Visitors were welcomed to the show by banners from Genetec, emblazoned with the slogan “Privacy matters… So, remember to forget me.” The video security provider’s stand demonstrated this concept more tangibly, via its Privacy Protector Module.  The surveillance software, which is certified with the European Privacy Seal (EuroPriSe), monitors events while automatically pixelating people and vehicles in real time. If an incident occurs, an authorised operator can securely access the unaltered video. Visitors were welcomed to the show by banners from Genetec Other companies also acknowledged issues of privacy and cybersecurity. Hikvision noted that Europe is more regulated, which limits the implementation of the company’s products compared to those used in China. Dahua emphasised that its data for the German market is stored in Frankfurt to meet demands for data protection. IDIS made a point of saying there are no backdoors to their products. The deep learning products are easy to use and 96% accurate, says the company. FLIR has developed a cybersecurity hardening document, and strives to be transparent about cyber issues, including a web landing page where customers can raise any concerns. Vanderbilt is also pushing the cloud as a way forward with its ACT365 cloud-based access and video solution. Users are not intimidated by the cloud anymore since we all use it in our personal lives, says the company. Also on the access control side, EVVA were clear on the security of their AirKey mobile access system, which uses technology based on internet banking, double encryption and high-quality hardware. As well as demonstrating its SAROS thermal camera, FLIR strived for cybersecurity concerns to be addressed by customers Taking a broader view Nedap views security as being about allowing people to focus on their daily lives and work, safe in the knowledge that security is being taken care of. At the show, Nedap launched its new slogan ‘Security for Life’, stating that “true security is when you don’t have to think about it”. Nedap’s global client program represents a long-term commitment to projects. They are having more discussions with clients about risk management through standardisation and centralised policy.Solutions – as opposed to products – were also a focus at Security Essen, as at IFSEC before it Clients remain with Nedap because they keep investing in the platform, constantly updating the code and simplifying it to improve scalability for organisations, says the company. Nedap had one of the few double-decker booths at Security Essen. Solutions – as opposed to products – were also a focus at Security Essen, as at IFSEC before it. HID Global touted their extensive use of partnerships to provide solutions. SeeTec highlighted their move away from products to a more solution-based approach. FLIR, perhaps best known as a thermal camera company, were pushing their solutions approach to markets including intelligent traffic, smart city, video management and PSIMs.  Nedap had one of the few double-decker booths at Security Essen Vertical markets in focus As vertical markets go, retail was big, and several players were offering some type of retail solution. Retail – along with banking, finance and transportation – was among Hikvision’s vertical markets of choice. Dahua's new panoramic cameras stitch together the image inside the camera instead of on the server SeeTec’s retail solution combines EAS with business intelligence and heat mapping. Dahua’s retail offerings include people counting and emotion detection, which can correlate with weather data, for example. Genetec also showcased a range of retail solutions. Technology improvements announced at Security Essen include FLIR's more robust FB6 series thermal line, Promise Technology's SMARTBOOST technology improved playback performance, and Videotec's cameras with better night performance. The extended 50m range of Optex's intrusion detection laser sensor reduces the need for cameras. Dahua's new panoramic cameras stitch together the image inside the camera instead of on the server. The Hanwha Techwin booth featured Korean flags and a “Korean at heart” motto to set the company apart Signs of the U.S. congressional ban There were signs at Security Essen of an impact of the recent U.S. ban on use of Hikvision and Dahua equipment in government installations, although both big Chinese manufacturers maintained a high profile at the German show. For example, the Hanwha Techwin booth featured Korean flags and a “Korean at heart” motto to set the company apart. Chinese camera manufacturer Uniview were keen to stress that they are not owned by Chinese government (neither is Dahua). Uniview’s all-IP camera line offers high resolution, low-light, multisensor and fisheye options, and AI software provides facial recognition, object detection, and fire and smoke detection at the edge. The company aims to increase its global presence with more international branch offerings and international factories.

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