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Surge protection for security installations: 2017 saw increased investment
Surge protection for security installations: 2017 saw increased investment

In 2017, DITEK saw how power surges from the many natural disasters that took place damaged many businesses. In a natural disaster, or even everyday business operations, a facility’s entire investment in security, life safety and surveillance systems technology can be disabled or rendered useless in a few seconds. Surge protection solutions can mitigate those risks and protect security investments. Proactive approach to risk mitigation Throughout 2017, we also witnessed a change in how enterprises view surge protection, which included how investments are being made in surge protection to protect valuable security, life safety and surveillance systems, while also reducing downtime, manpower costs, liability vulnerabilities, and possibly compliance issues that can force businesses to actually cease operations. Effective security management is about mitigating risks. But risks cannot be mitigated without a proactive approach. Enterprises and integrators, who take the time to assess risk and to develop a strategy to incorporate effective detection, deter and response criteria to protect physical assets will be successful in 2018. 2018 and beyond That strategy includes designing surge protection into new security systems, while also adding surge protection to existing systems. Enterprises and security integrators who implement a surge protection strategy during security planning processes – or after – will be exercising prevention and mitigation, and they will be successful in 2018 and beyond.  Surge protection devices have an untapped potential for enterprise surveillance and security systems In 2017, Ditek continued to offer security end users a solid surge protection solution. We also successfully educated system integrators, who are seeking value-added products or services to incorporate into their portfolios, on the importance of surge protection devices. Educating security integrators We believe that surge protection devices have an untapped potential for enterprise video surveillance and security systems, because they can and do meet safety and security challenges that have been rarely identified in the past. We are looking forward to 2018, when we will continue to develop new surge protection products – including a new product engineered to protect up to twelve individual fuel dispensers, which is critical to the financial operation of convenience stores. We will also continue to educate security integrators about the importance of including surge protection in the design/build RFP, to not only secure an enterprise’s valuable security equipment, but also to help integrators to differentiate their capabilities and knowledge from the competition.

Technology evolution leads to changes in security control room furniture
Technology evolution leads to changes in security control room furniture

Technology is changing the look and function of today’s security control rooms. Old-school CRT (cathode-ray tube) monitors are giving way to the thinner, flat screen monitors in the control room environment, but the transition is gradual. Randy Smith of Winsted still sees many control rooms that need to make the conversion, which is a boon to his company’s business. Furniture today is designed differently to accommodate the thinner monitors, often with larger screens. Need for integrated rack systems With the increase of IP-based systems comes the need for integrated rack systems that include advanced functionality such as cable management, adds Jim Coleman, National Sales Manager, AFC Industries. Server rooms are environmentally controlled by cooling systems and power systems monitored on the IP network. Low-profile flat screens allow centres to utilise space vertically, thus creating a smaller footprint for the consoles. Additionally, with IP-based systems, workstations will have a smaller footprint because there is less cumbersome equipment. In most cases the servers are stored in a secured, climate controlled environment to eliminate overheating of the servers and maintain their security, says Coleman. This environment also helps with cable and power management. AFC builds technical furniture racks that adhere to the precise needs of computer network server room operators. The company designs and fabricates LAN workbenches with versatile functionalities, and server room workstation racks that are scalable. There is a complete line of IT workbenches, IT computer racks and computer server rack mounts with flexible mounting options. In most cases the servers are stored in a secured, climate controlled environment to eliminate overheating of the servers and maintain their security Flexible control room designs Matko Papic, Chief Technology Officer of Evans Consoles, says the transition from bulky CRT equipment to flat-screen (lower profile) monitors was a major disruption in control room design; it changed the whole dynamic. Another evolution is the use of IP video streaming, which allows more flexibility in manipulation of audio-video content, and requires more flexible control room designs. Another shift, driven by larger, higher-definition monitors, is a shift to fewer monitors that display more information. Instead of a smaller monitor for each information stream, larger monitors now consolidate that information into “dashboard” displays. Looking ahead, control rooms will need to be more flexible, both in the initial design and the ability to adapt to changing technology, says Papic. Legacy customers who are currently using PCs may be moving to more remote applications. Sit-stand equipment will continue to be increasingly prevalent. “There will be more emphasis on flexibility, technology integration, and the ability to change over the life of the system,” says Papic. Consolidation of multiple operations into a single system A trend in security is consolidation of multiple physical operations into a single system, says Papic. As a result, more customers are taking more interest in alarm management and situational awareness. How is the technology being used in terms of alarm triggers? How can the systems react rapidly and provide information to a larger audience in the control room? These questions impact how control rooms are designed, and Evans Consoles can adapt lessons learned from other markets to these trends in the security arena. Greater use of technology is inevitable, says Coleman of AFC Industries. “It is virtually impossible for humans to monitor all security data at the street level in our cities,” he says. “As computers become more powerful and their programs more all-encompassing, we will see a greater shift to robotic and technology uses that will provide enhanced monitoring capabilities and safety Read our Control Rooms series here

Will security industry consolidation stifle innovation?
Will security industry consolidation stifle innovation?

The security industry will continue to see consolidation through acquisition in 2017. At the advent of IP camera adoption, we saw a great decline in large vertically integrated companies, which spurred a new era of innovation within smaller IP camera manufacturers, VMS providers and other hardware companies for storage and managed switches.   We are now living in a new era of consolidation that is taking us full-circle back to vertical integration. Ultimately, the industry as a whole suffers because this consolidation will stifle innovation until the next big technology disruption takes shape. Interoperability across different verticals  This time last year, we noted that the marketplace was moving toward converged technologies and the need for alarm management across multiple platforms into a common interface, turned out to be a popular request. If anything, we are only seeing just the beginning phases of this transition. The biggest surprise is that interoperability is not only confined to security technology, but also extends to parallel systems such as building automation, safety and environmental controls, and even Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software. Using Video Event Management Software (VEMS) alongside these intelligent platforms proves to be a valuable verification process for many new and exciting vertical markets. Arteco plans to continue the revenue growth and brand awareness achieved in 2016 Event-based video security software At Arteco, our highest growth sectors tend to be slightly insulated from economic fluctuation in the sense that we focus on securing critical infrastructure (electrical utilities and communications) as well as corporate and education campuses. Unfortunately, the continued growth in active shooter incidents have made physical security concerns top of mind for many organisations regardless of economic impact. The unexpected repercussions are that many new security technologies are emerging that cater to real-time event notification on both the macro and micro level. The exciting part of this trend is that users are leveraging a layered approach with multiple autonomous applications working together toward a common goal to improve security, which will hopefully ensure a high level of protection.  Business growth and challenges Business has continued to grow year-over-year, and 2016 was a huge step forward for Arteco not only in terms of revenue growth, but also increased brand awareness in the United States and abroad. Our biggest challenge continues to be the crowded VMS market, which is filled with lower cost or even free substitute products. We are making great strides in overcoming this challenge by having a wonderful team of people, both on the technical and sales side of the organisation, who are focused on finding new and innovative ways to advance intuitive, open and affordable event-based and intelligent video security software into 2017. See the full coverage of 2016/2017 Review and Forecast articles here 

Latest BBV Ltd news

Dedicated Micros and AD Network  showcase their best at IFSEC 2011
Dedicated Micros and AD Network showcase their best at IFSEC 2011

 New products on show include additions to the CamVu IP camera range including the CamVu 720 dome cameras Dedicated Micros and AD Network Video - both part of the AD Group of Companies - are taking an innovative approach to exhibiting at IFSEC this year with the main feature of the stand being their new state of the art, articulated demonstration vehicle. The Company made the decision to invest in the new vehicle after the success of it's Closed IPTV road shows which ran throughout the Winter. Closed IPTV, IP video products are installed on the vehicle together with the latest innovations from the AD Group, and are now at the fingertips of integrators, installers, specifiers and end users in the UK all year round.New products on show include additions to the CamVu IP camera range including the CamVu 720 dome and box cameras which feature exceptional low light performance, high definition resolution with up to two megapixels of on-board recording to micro SD card, transmission on alarm and multiple video streams in MPEG4, JPEG and H.264 simultaneously at different, transcoded resolution and bit rate to meet bandwidth requirements, while maintaining a differentiated high quality record rate for use as evidence.Complementing the new HD IP camera products, is a new CamVu IP camera with in-camera de warping, which leverages the inherent de-warping capability of the Group's ChipWrights ViSP, combined with the benefit of a five megapixel sensor. Multiple independent streams are managed seamlessly, with no need for special software, within the NetVu ObserVer viewing application offering electronic zoom of each view. The NV8 joins the DV-IP, enterprise server/decoder range, boasting an impressive 300Mbits of video streaming bandwidthAs part of the NetVu Connected family of seamless video products, images from the camera are recorded and viewed alongside the images of both analogue and IP cameras deployed within the same system.The new CamVu IP cameras add to Dedicated Micros growing range of easy to use IP video products including the IFSEC Awards finalist, the SD Excel Closed IPTV, the hybrid DVR/NVR capable of recording, streaming and displaying multiple HD IP cameras seamlessly alongside a mix of analogue cameras. The IFSEC Awards finalist, the high definition NetVu Console is at work displaying multi-media video content around the stand while providing demonstration points which illustrate the seamless integration of IP and analogue cameras within a single, embedded user interface - a key capability which has been inherent in NetVu Connected products for many years.Offering high definition recording and powerful re-display performance, the NV8 joins the DV-IP, enterprise server/decoder range, boasting an impressive 300Mbits of video streaming bandwidth, delivering a flexible configuration solution operating as either a real-time HD/hybrid multi-screen decoder for high performance video wall deployment or as a dedicated real time encoder for recording and transmission or both analogue and HD IP cameras.Pick-a-Point provides seamless management of hybrid systems incorporating crucial security features such as alarm handling, video downloadStrategic partner, BBV's Pick-a-Point video management system forms part of the AD Group's enterprise video management system, which offers a user friendly, map based touch screen workstation, scalable to large enterprise solutions. Compatible with NetVu Connected video products, Pick-a-Point provides seamless management of hybrid systems incorporating crucial security features such as alarm handling, video download and evidence burning, integration with 3rd parties such as GDX, Protec, Commend and AD Group's patented Emergency Messaging System. New to Pick-a-Point at IFSEC, is the integration of Dedicated Micros Point and Go, PTZ capability which allows the operator to select the area of interest on screen with a simple click of the mouse, a perfect solution to PTZ control over IP networks.Continuing it's focus on vertical markets, AD Network Video strengthens it's Fire and Transport market solutions with new products on show which meet specific demands of each sector. The new FireVu Dome, borne out of the AD Group's D-Tec division and marketed within the AD Network Video portfolio, features video smoke detection and video transmission capability and when combined with the new FV1 annunciator, provides a solution to the growing problem to commercial property owners, of non-emergency response from the Fire Service. FireVu enables RVRCs such as AD Group's Remguard division and other ARCs with the capability to provide visually verified smoke and fire alarms which fully integrate with the existing fire alarms and building management systems, satisfying the need of fire authorities which require visually verified alarms from commercial premises.The TransVu mobile video recorder takes centre stage in an innovative motor racing displayTaking a look at the value added video solutions to the transport sector, the AD Group's TSS division is showing the mobile CCTV unit developed for Gloucestershire Constabulary, which features the award winning TransVu, mobile video recorder in the form of PatrolVu and Dedicated Micros Infiniti, ruggedised, PTZ camera with integrated IR illumination. Visitors are invited to see how a real Mobile Police unit operates in practice.The TransVu mobile video recorder takes centre stage in an innovative motor racing display, showing off it's performance in extreme conditions. Testing TransVu on AD Group's Le Mans Sportscar has played a significant part in making the product robust and reliable to meet the demands of the transport sector, and when combined with vehicle telemetry and telematics data, offers a significant return on investment to the transport operator."Our investment into a new demonstration vehicle underlines our commitment to training and education at all levels in the professional video security channel. AD Group's, hybrid and pure IP video solution..."Footage from the TransVu is on show, which was recorded during the crash which occurred at Spa Francorchamps this month. During the crash, the TransVu, which sustained an impact in excess of 40G at 180km/h, carried on recording throughout, as true testament to the suitability of the product for harsh environments.Pauline Norstrom, Marketing Director and Board Director for Dedicated Micros and AD Group, comments, "Our investment into a new demonstration vehicle underlines our commitment to training and education at all levels in the professional video security channel. AD Group's, hybrid and pure IP video solution Closed IPTV is best seen in a live deployment and the vehicle allows us to to do just that by bringing the solution, together with those of the Group to the installer and user.""Products and solutions from Dedicated Micros and AD Network Video, broadly sit in three distinct groups; video recording and management solutions for public and commercial property installations, video smoke and fire detection and visual verification solutions for the Fire market and robust, integrated solutions for the Transport market. The diversity and differentiation of our products set the AD Group apart from other manufacturers as our solutions are truly seamless."The new demonstration vehicle can be seen on Stand E10 at the entrance to Hall 4. Training and demonstrations of Dedicated Micros and AD Network Video products are available throughout the show.

Dedicated Micros cost effective digital video security solution saves Sun Microsystems millions of dollars
Dedicated Micros cost effective digital video security solution saves Sun Microsystems millions of dollars

 Sun Microsystems deploys Dedicated Micros digital video security solution Digital, networked, CCTV solutions from Dedicated Micros - part of AD Group - including its high performance DV-IP Servers, are playing a key role in allowing Sun Microsystems, headquartered in Santa Clara, California, to not only enhance the security of its offices worldwide but also, crucially, to realise an impressive return on investment which, to date, has resulted in savings which run into millions of dollars.The customer challengeWith 34,440 employees spread across more than 300 offices in over 100 countries worldwide, Sun Microsystems has a massive security challenge. For more than 15 years, Sun's security organisation relied on analog CCTV systems using VCRs to capture and store video. The disadvantages of this approach were numerous, starting with the high maintenance and support costs, in addition to the labour required to change tapes, review tapes, and replace broken tapes.Steve Kruschke, Sun's Manager of New Security Technologies and Applications, led the effort to find a digital solution in 2005: "We wanted leading edge digital technology to leverage our IP network infrastructure, and we needed a matrix solution to control multiple video servers from centralised regional control rooms," said Kruschke. "Additionally, we were looking for a solution that was not reliant on Windows-based personal computers."Dedicated Micros solutionSun Microsystems chose to build its new video surveillance system around the Dedicated Micros DV-IP Server, a high-performance network Digital Video Recorder and Server developed to meet the demands of professional surveillance applications."Dedicated Micros is one the very few digital video surveillance companies that doesn't require the installation of client software on a PC," stated Kruschke. "The DV-IP Server has no problem handling our network-based, Solaris-FireFox architecture." Sun Microsystems chose to build its new video surveillance system around the Dedicated Micros DV-IP ServerWorking with global distributor and systems integration partner Siemens Security, Sun has deployed approximately 1500 plus channels of video through the DV-IP Servers worldwide to date. Sun also installed multiple DV-IP Codec units.In encoder mode the DV-IP Codec enables existing and new analog cameras to be added to an IP network, allowing Sun's legacy video surveillance systems to expand and adapt to digital without the cost and trouble of completely replacing and redesigning the installation.Pick-a-Point Digital Matrix for Regional Control Centres In late 2007, Sun's operations group began looking for ways to bring large-scale digital video surveillance to its five regional control centres, located Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America. In the past, analog video was brought into the regional control centres using local A/D switches."We wanted to bring live and recorded digital video from local offices into the regional centres, and at the same time make the control interface more user friendly for operators," recalled Kruschke. "After gaining approval from our IT department to bring video across network, we decided to make the North American regional control centre in Broomfield, Colorado our first test site."At the heart of the large-scale video surveillance system is the Pick-a-Point centralised command and control workstation offered by Dedicated Micros and developed by integrator and strategic partner BBV."The unique embedded Pick-a-Point control system is ideal for Sun's computing environment because it is a dedicated standalone hardware based workstation, which eliminates reliability and training issues associated with PC based client software systems," said Kruschke.Another exciting new application is live monitoring of ongoing events. For example, Sun has about a dozen offices in the area of the southeastern United States that was affected by hurricane Gustav. Using Pick-a-Point and DV-IP Servers, operators in Colorado were able to help manage personnel during the event by checking live video feeds of office locations. Multiple DV-IP Codec units are also installed at SunReturn on investmentSun Microsystems has achieved a substantial return on its investment from Dedicated Micros' DV-IP Servers. Kruschke estimates that eliminating approximately 400 VCRs and the number of tapes required for 14-day backups saves the company $99,000 per year in maintenance globally. Even more significant is the $1.8 million in global yearly labour costs that Kruschke calculates is saved by Dedicated Micros DV-IP Servers.Said Pauline Norstrom, Director of Worldwide Marketing at Dedicated Micros: "The experience of Sun Microsystems in this case demonstrates the positive impact that, specifying and installing, an effective surveillance solution can have for a business." View full Dedicated Micros case study

Dedicated Micros cost effective digital video security solution saves Sun Microsystems millions of dollars
Dedicated Micros cost effective digital video security solution saves Sun Microsystems millions of dollars

Digital, networked, CCTV solutions from Dedicated Micros - part of AD Group - including its high performance DV-IP Servers, are playing a key role in allowing Sun Microsystems, headquartered in Santa Clara, California, to not only enhance the security of its offices worldwide but also, crucially, to realise an impressive return on investment which, to date, has resulted in savings which run into millions of dollars. The customer challenge Sun Microsystems provides network computing infrastructure solutions that include: computer systems, software, storage, and services. Its core brands range from the Java technology platform to the Solaris operating system. With 34,440 employees spread across more than 300 offices in over 100 countries worldwide, Sun Microsystems has a massive security challenge. The company needs to make sure employees feel secure, while at the same time protecting valuable assets and limiting liability. Most security cameras are placed at building entrances and exits, providing a facial view of people as they enter and leave the facility. Video footage is most often reviewed for after-the-fact investigations of personal property thefts, which may occur more than a dozen times a month around the globe. For more than 15 years, Sun's security organisation relied on analogue CCTV systems using VCRs to capture and store video. The disadvantages of this approach were numerous, starting with the high maintenance and support costs, in addition to the labour required to change tapes, review tapes, and replace broken tapes.  When security needed to find a particular event on the videotapes, they often had to review hours of footage to locate the exact time and date. Steve Kruschke, Sun's Manager of New Security Technologies and Applications, led the effort to find a digital solution in 2005: "We wanted leading edge digital technology to leverage our IP network infrastructure, and we needed a matrix solution to control multiple video servers from centralised regional control rooms," said Kruschke. "Additionally, we were looking for a solution that was not reliant on Windows-based personal computers." At Sun, all employees use ultra-thin clients called Sun Rays, which have no local operating system to manage and administer. Sun Rays process only keyboard input and screen output, leaving all of the application processing and storage to the server. Employees walk up to a Sun Ray, insert a smart card, and their desktop session appears just as they last left it. Common business applications, like word processing, email, and spreadsheets are web-based and delivered through the FireFox browser. The vast majority of digital video surveillance systems, however, are built around the Microsoft Windows platform and require users to install a client software application on the computer that will be used to view and control video. This was unacceptable for Sun. Dedicated Micros surveillance solution   Sun Microsystems has achieved a substantial return on its investment from Dedicated Micros' DV-IP Servers Sun Microsystems chose to build its new video surveillance system around the Dedicated Micros DV-IP Server, a high-performance network Digital Video Recorder and Server developed to meet the demands of professional surveillance applications. Available in 8, 12, or 16 camera input models, the DV-IP Server supports advanced MultiMode Recording to dynamically switch resolution, record rate, and compression, in either JPEG or MPEG format, from a wide range of analogue or IP cameras. Most importantly for Sun, the DV-IP interface capabilities can be accessed locally and remotely via a web browser. "Dedicated Micros is one the very few digital video surveillance companies that doesn't require the installation of client software on a PC," stated Kruschke. "The DV-IP Server has no problem handling our network-based, Solaris-FireFox architecture." Working with global distributor and systems integration partner Siemens Security, Sun has deployed approximately 1500 plus channels of video through the DV-IP Servers worldwide to date. Sun also installed multiple DV-IP Codec units. These single channel selectable encoder and decoder combination units are designed to increase the flexibility of surveillance networks. In encoder mode the DV-IP Codec enables existing and new analogue cameras to be added to an IP network, allowing Sun's legacy video surveillance systems to expand and adapt to digital without the cost and trouble of completely replacing and redesigning the installation. Siemens Security maintains a staff on Sun campuses to handle installation and service, while a global purchasing contract streamlines the process of acquiring the Dedicated Micros equipment at the regional level. Pick-a-Point Digital Matrix for regional control centres In late 2007, Sun's operations group began looking for ways to bring large-scale digital video surveillance to its five regional control centres, located Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America. In the past, analogue video was brought into the regional control centres using local A/D switches. "We wanted to bring live and recorded digital video from local offices into the regional centres, and at the same time make the control interface more user friendly for operators," recalled Kruschke. "After gaining approval from our IT department to bring video across network, we decided to make the North American regional control centre in Broomfield, Colorado our first test site." At the heart of the large-scale video surveillance system is the Pick-a-Point centralised command and control workstation offered by Dedicated Micros and developed by integrator and strategic partner BBV. This digital matrix solution provides an intuitive environment, allowing the display of cameras from a number of monitored sites and delivering control over any servers, DVRs, domes, and cameras in the system, while retaining all important keyboard and joystick functionality. The Pick-a-Point viewing station is a dedicated IP keyboard solution with traditional joystick control, which provides either additional control points on a Pick-a-Point system, or operates standalone to provide composite viewing and control of any Dedicated Micros NetVu Connected Server, DVR or IP camera. "The unique embedded Pick-a-Point control system is ideal for Sun's computing environment because it is a dedicated standalone hardware based workstation, which eliminates reliability and training issues associated with PC based client software systems," said Kruschke. Several Pick-a-Point features contribute to ease of use. Site maps provide a graphical representation of camera positions, allowing the operator to easily track events from camera to camera throughout the system. Using Pick-a-Point's graphical user interface, operators can simply pick and click cameras from a site's database to view images - without having to know which DVR the camera is linked to. And the unique Pick-a-Point keyboard provides intuitive easy to use camera selection and joystick telemetry control without the need for a PC "qwerty" keyboard.   Sun Microsystems also installed multiple Dedicated Micros' DV-IP Codec units Operators at the Broomfield control centre use the Pick-a-Point workstation for three primary activities. Guard tour is conducted around the clock, as live individual camera feeds are brought up together on a composite screen. Several times weekly, the system is used to check cameras remotely and review video quality. Finally, recorded video is reviewed on Pick-a-Point systems on an "as needed" basis for investigations of personal property theft and other incidents. Another exciting new application is live monitoring of ongoing events. For example, Sun has about a dozen offices in the area of the south-eastern United States that was affected by hurricane Gustav. Using Pick-a-Point and DV-IP Servers, operators in Colorado were able to help manage personnel during the event by checking live video feeds of office locations. Exceptional customer service According to Kruschke, Dedicated Micros has provided not only great customer service, but also a willingness to listen to customer requests and use customer input in product development. "Whenever we've had difficulties, Dedicated Micros has been there to help us work though the issues," said Kruschke. "When we saturated the network bandwidth sending video to the control centre, Dedicated Micros worked side-by-side with us to adjust video resolution and other settings." Return on Investment Sun Microsystems has achieved a substantial return on its investment from Dedicated Micros' DV-IP Servers. Kruschke estimates that eliminating approximately 400 VCRs and the number of tapes required for 14-day backups saves the company $99,000 per year in maintenance globally. Even more significant is the $1.8 million in global yearly labour costs that Kruschke calculates is saved by Dedicated Micros DV-IP Servers. Said Pauline Norstrom, Director of Worldwide Marketing at Dedicated Micros: "The experience of Sun Microsystems in this case demonstrates the positive impact that, specifying and installing, an effective surveillance solution can have for a business. This is especially true in terms of enhanced security and, crucially, through a more efficient use of resources to deliver concrete benefits for their bottom line. The fact that we were able to offer a robust embedded approach to CCTV, which was not reliant on a Windows PC-based platform, was also a key factor in our favour for this ambitious project."