CCTV monitors - Expert commentary

How AI and security guards work together using video analytics
How AI and security guards work together using video analytics

How AI and humans can work together is a longstanding debate. As society progresses technologically, there’s always the worry of robots taking over jobs. Self-checkout tills, automated factory machines, and video analytics are all improving efficiency and productivity, but they can still work in tandem with humans, and in most cases, they need to. Video analytics in particular is one impressively intelligent piece of technology that security guards can utilise. How can video analytics help with certain security scenarios? Video analytics tools Before video analytics or even CCTV in general, if a child went missing in a shopping centre, we could only rely on humans. Take a crowded Saturday shopping centre, a complex one with a multitude of shops and eateries, you’d have to alert the security personnel, rely on a tannoy and search party, and hope for a lockdown to find a lost or kidnapped child. With video analytics, how would this scenario play out? It’s pretty mind-blowing. As soon as security is alerted, they can work with the video analytics tools to instruct it precisely With the same scenario, you now have the help of many different cameras, but then there’s the task of searching through all the CCTV resources and footage. That’s where complex search functions come in. As soon as security is alerted, they can work with the video analytics tools to instruct it precisely on what footage to narrow down, and there’s a lot of filters and functions to use. Expected movement direction For instance, they can tick a ‘human’ field, so the AI can track and filter out vehicles, objects etc., and then they can input height, clothing colours, time the child went missing, and last known location. There’s a complex event to check too, under ‘child kidnap’. For a more accurate search, security guards can then add in a searching criterion by drawing the child’s expected movement direction using a visual query function. A unique function like this enables visual criteria-based searches rather than text-based ones. The tech will then narrow down to the images/videos showing the criteria they’ve inputted, showing the object/child that matches the data and filter input. Detecting facial data There are illegal demonstrations and troublesome interferences that police have to deal with A white-list face recognition function is then used to track the child’s route which means the AI can detect facial data that has not been previously saved in the database, allowing it to track the route of a target entity, all in real time. Then, security guards can confirm the child’s route and current location. All up-to-date info can then be transferred to an onsite guard’s mobile phone for them to confirm the missing child’s movement route, face, and current location, helping to find them as quickly as possible. Often, there are illegal demonstrations and troublesome interferences that police have to deal with. Video analytics and surveillance can not only capture these, but they can be used to predict when they may happen, providing a more efficient process in dealing with these types of situations and gathering resources. Event processing functions Picture a public square with a number of entries into the main area, and at each entry point or path, there is CCTV. Those in the control room can set two events for each camera: a grouping event and a path-passing event. These are pretty self-explanatory. A grouping event covers images of seeing people gathering in close proximity and a path-passing event will show when people are passing through or entering. The video analytics tool can look out for large gatherings and increased footfall to alert security By setting these two events, the video analytics tool can look out for large gatherings and increased footfall to alert security or whoever is monitoring to be cautious of protests, demonstrations or any commotion. Using complex event processing functions, over-detection of alarms can also be prevented, especially if there’s a busy day with many passing through. Reducing false alarms By combining the two events, that filters down the triggers for alarms for better accuracy to predict certain situations, like a demonstration. The AI can also be set to only trigger an alarm when the two events are happening simultaneously on all the cameras of each entry to reduce false alarms. There are so many situations and events that video analytics can be programmed to monitor. You can tick fields to monitor any objects that have appeared, disappeared, or been abandoned. You can also check events like path-passing to monitor traffic, as well as loitering, fighting, grouping, a sudden scene change, smoke, flames, falling, unsafe crossing, traffic jams and car accidents etc. Preventing unsafe situations Complex events can include violations of one-way systems, blacklist-detected vehicles Complex events can include violations of one-way systems, blacklist-detected vehicles, person and vehicle tracking, child kidnaps, waste collection, over-speed vehicles, and demonstration detections. The use of video analytics expands our capabilities tremendously, working in real time to detect and help predict security-related situations. Together with security agents, guards and operatives, AI in CCTV means resources can be better prepared, and that the likelihood of preventing unsafe situations can be greatly improved. It’s a winning team, as AI won’t always get it right but it’s there to be the advanced eyes we need to help keep businesses, premises and areas safer.

Video surveillance as a service (VSaaS) from an integrator and user perspective
Video surveillance as a service (VSaaS) from an integrator and user perspective

Technology based on the cloud has become a popular trend. Most IT systems now operate within the cloud or offer cloud capabilities, and video surveillance is no exception: virtually every major hardware and software vendor offers cloud-based services. Users benefit from the cloud due to its numerous advantages, such as ease of implementation, scalability, low maintenance costs, etc. Video surveillance as a service (VSaaS) offers many choices, so there is an optimal solution for each user. However, what about integrators? For them, VSaaS is also a game-changer. Integrators are now incentivised to think about how they can maintain their markets and take advantage of the new business opportunities that the cloud model provides.   Hosted video surveillance The cloud service model has drastically changed the role of an integrator. Traditionally, integrators provided a variety of services including system installation, support, and maintenance, as well as served as a bridge between vendors and end-users. In contrast, hosted video surveillance as a service requires a security system installer to simply install cameras and connect them to the network, while the provider is in direct contact with each end-user. The cloud service model has drastically changed the role of an integrator There is no end to on-premises systems. However, the percentage of systems where the integrator’s role is eliminated or considerably reduced will continue to increase. How can integrators sustain their markets and stay profitable? A prospective business model might be to become a provider of VSaaS (‘cloud integrator’) in partnership with software platform vendors. Cloud-based surveillance Some VMS vendors offer software VSaaS platforms that form the basis for cloud-based surveillance systems. Using these solutions, a data centre operator, integrator, or telecom service provider can design a public VSaaS or VSaaS in a private cloud to service a large customer. The infrastructure can be built on any generic cloud platform or data centre, as well as resources owned by the provider or client. So, VSaaS providers have the choice between renting infrastructure from a public cloud service like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, or Google Cloud or using their own or clients’ computing infrastructure (virtual machines or physical servers). Gaining competitive advantage When integrators purchase commitment use contracts for several years, they can achieve significant savings As an example, a telecom carrier could deploy VSaaS on their own infrastructure to expand their service offering for clients, gaining a competitive advantage and enhancing profits per user. Using a public cloud, a smaller integrator can host the computing infrastructure immediately, without incurring up-front costs and with no need to maintain the system. These cloud services provide scalability, security, and reliability with zero initial investment. When integrators purchase commitment use contracts for several years, they can achieve significant savings. Next, let’s examine VSaaS options available in the market from an end-users point of view. With hosted (or cloud-first, or true-cloud) VSaaS solutions, all the video feeds are transmitted directly from cameras to the cloud. Optionally, video can be buffered to SD cards installed on cameras to prevent data losses in case of Internet connection failures. Dedicated hardware bridges There are many providers of such services that offer their own brand cameras. Connecting these devices to the cloud should only take a few clicks. Firmware updates are usually centralised, so users don’t have to worry about security breaches. Service providers may offer dedicated hardware bridges for buffering video footage and secure connections to the cloud for their branded and third-party cameras. Service providers may offer dedicated hardware bridges for buffering video footage Typical bridges are inexpensive, basic NVRs that receive video feeds from cameras, record on HDD, and send video streams to the cloud. The most feature-rich bridges include those with video analytics, data encryption, etc. Introducing a bridge or NVR makes the system hybrid, with videos stored both locally and in the cloud. At the other end of the spectrum relative to hosted VSaaS, there are cloud-managed systems. Video management software In this case, video is stored on-site on DVRs, NVRs, video management software servers, or even locally on cameras, with an option of storing short portions of footage (like alarm videos) in the cloud for quick access. A cloud service can be used for remote viewing live video feeds and recorded footage, as well as for system configuration and health monitoring. Cloud management services often come bundled with security cameras, NVRs, and video management software, whereas other VSaaS generally require subscriptions. Keep in mind that the system, in this case, remains on-premises, and the advantages of the cloud are limited to remote monitoring and configuring. It’s a good choice for businesses that are spread across several locations or branches, especially if they have systems in place at each site. On-site infrastructure All that needs to be changed is the NVRs or VMS with a cloud-compatible model or version All locations and devices can be remotely monitored using the cloud while keeping most of the existing on-site infrastructure. All that needs to be changed is the NVRs or VMS with a cloud-compatible model or version. Other methods are more costly and/or require more resources to implement. Hosted VSaaS helps leverage the cloud for the highest number of benefits in terms of cost and technological advantages. In this case, the on-site infrastructure consists of only IP cameras and network equipment. This reduces maintenance costs substantially and also sets the foundation for another advantage of VSaaS: extreme and rapid scalability. At the same time, the outgoing connection at each site is critical for hosted VSaaS. Video quality and the number of cameras directly depend on bandwidth. Broadband-connected locations Because the system does not work offline, a stable connection is required to stream videos. In addition, cloud storage can be expensive when many cameras are involved, or when video archives are retained for an extended period. The hosted VSaaS is a great choice for a small broadband-connected location The hosted VSaaS is a great choice for small broadband-connected locations and is also the most efficient way to centralise video surveillance for multiple sites of the same type, provided they do not have a legacy system. Since it is easy to implement and maintain, this cloud technology is especially popular in countries with high labour costs. Using different software and hardware platforms, integrators can implement various types of VSaaS solutions. Quick remote access For those who adhere to the classic on-premises approach, adding a cloud-based monitoring service can grow their value proposition for clients with out-of-the-box capabilities of quick remote access to multiple widely dispersed sites and devices. For small true-cloud setups, there is a possibility to rent a virtual machine and storage capacity in a public cloud (such as Amazon, Google, or Microsoft) and deploy the cloud-based VMS server that can handle dozens of cameras. In terms of features, such a system may include anything from plain video monitoring via a web interface to GPU-accelerated AI video analytics and smart search in recorded footage, depending on the particular software platform. Optimising internet connection Hybrid VSaaS is the most flexible approach that enables tailoring the system to the users’ needs High-scale installations, such as VSaaS for public use or large private systems for major clients, involve multiple parts like a virtual VMS server cluster, web portal, report subsystem, etc. Such systems can also utilise either own or rented infrastructure. Some vendors offer software for complex installations of this kind, though there are not as many options as for cloud-managed systems. Finally, hybrid VSaaS is the most flexible approach that enables tailoring the system to the users’ unique needs while optimising internet connection bandwidth, cloud storage costs, and infrastructure complexity. It’s high time for integrators to gain experience, choose the right hardware and software, and explore different ways of building systems that will suit evolving customer demands in the future.

Changing the landscape of event security with Martyn’s Law
Changing the landscape of event security with Martyn’s Law

Martyn’s Law (also known as ‘Protect Duty’) could forever change the landscape of event security if changes to legislation are passed. Some would argue it already has. In 2017, just as concertgoers were leaving the Manchester Arena, a terrorist detonated an improvised explosive device in a suicide attack killing 22 and injuring more than 250. The mother of one of the victims, Martyn Hett, has tirelessly campaigned for tighter security and a duty of care to be placed upon venues to protect their patrons. As a result, Martyn’s Law (‘Protect Duty’) has been proposed in UK legislation to protect the public from terrorism. At the same time, other global trends have indicated the need for action on this front. Labour-intensive task The Global Terrorism Index 2020, for instance, reported a steep increase in far-right attacks in North America, Western Europe, and Oceania, stating a 250% rise since 2014, with a 709% increase in deaths over the same period. But, how do we implement the measures proposed by Martyn’s law without intruding on our lives through mass surveillance? The Global Terrorism Index 2020, reported a steep increase in far-right attacks in North America Traditionally, cameras and CCTV have been the go-to solution for monitoring. However, maintaining a comprehensive view of locations with complex layouts or venues that host large crowds and gatherings can be a challenging and labour-intensive task for operatives. Camera outputs have been designed to be interpreted by people, which, in turn, requires a significant human resource that’s liable to inconsistent levels of accuracy in complex environments where getting things wrong can have a catastrophic impact. Highly accurate insights Fortunately, technology is evolving. AI-based perception strategies are being developed alongside advancements in 3D data capture technologies – including lidar, radar, and ToF cameras - that are capable of transforming surveillance with enhanced layers of autonomy and intelligence. As a result, smart, automated systems will be able to work alongside the security workforce to provide an always-on, omniscient view of the environment, delivering highly accurate insights and actionable data. And, with the right approach, this can be achieved without undue impact on our rights as private citizens. While much of this innovation isn’t new, it has been held back from at-scale adoption due to the gaps that remain between the data that’s captured and the machine’s ability to process it into an actionable insight. High traffic environments It’s crucial that they are able to detect all individuals and track their behaviour as they interact In security, for example, this gap is most present when it comes to addressing occlusion (in other words, recognising objects that move in and out of view of the sensors scanning a space). For security systems to provide the high levels of accuracy required in high traffic environments, such as concert venues, it’s crucial that they are able to detect all individuals and track their behaviour as they interact with a space and those within it. This, of course, is possible using multiple sensor modes. However, without the right perception platform to interpret the data being captured, the risk of missing crucial events as a result of the machine misinterpreting a partially concealed individual as an inanimate object, for instance, is significant. Identifiable personal data This gap is narrowing, and thanks to the first wave of sensor innovators, this shift in dependence from video read by people to 3D data point clouds read by machines have meant that we are now able to capture much richer information and data sets that can precisely detect and classify objects and behaviours – without capturing biometric and identifiable personal data. But what we need to fully close the gap are perception strategies and approaches that can adapt to the ever-changing nature of real-world environments. This gap is narrowing, and thanks to the first wave of sensor innovators Until now, this has been a lengthy and costly process requiring those implementing or developing solutions to start from scratch in developing software, algorithms, and training data every time the context or sensor mode is changed. But, by combining proven 3D sensor technologies like lidar with the deep learning first approach, this needed to be the case. Edge processing platform That’s why we are developing an adaptive edge processing platform for lidar that’s capable of understanding the past and present behaviour of people and objects within a given area. Through deep learning, it can predict the near-future behaviour of each object with some degree of certainty, thereby accurately and consistently generating real-time data and tracking the movement of people in the secured environment at scale. This approach has value beyond security. Facilities teams, for example, can extract a wealth of information beyond the primary function of security to support other priorities such as cleaning (tracking facility usage so that schedules can be adjusted), while retailers can optimise advertising and display efforts by identifying areas of high footfall. Likewise, health and safety teams can gather much deeper insights into the way spaces are used to enhance processes and measures to protect their users. Programming limitless scenarios Martyn’s Law will leave them with no option but to rethink their approach to security and safety As we’ve explained, perception is reaching new levels of sophistication through deep learning. By continually programming limitless scenarios, our approach can provide consistently accurate and rich data that users can trust. This will ultimately change the way we manage environments at a time when liability comes with ever-increasing consequences. For venue providers, Martyn’s Law will leave them with no option but to rethink their approach to security and safety. But, with new, smarter, more accurate tools at their disposal that will enable them to predict and protect, rather than just react, risks – both human and commercial – can be addressed. Meanwhile, the public can take comfort in knowing that measures to keep them safe needn’t mean sacrificing their privacy.

Latest Vicon Industries news

Vicon appoints Andronicus Turner and Jason Lloyd as new regional sales managers
Vicon appoints Andronicus Turner and Jason Lloyd as new regional sales managers

Vicon Industries, Inc., a subsidiary of Cemtrex Inc., and leading designer and manufacturer of video surveillance and access control software, hardware, and components, announced the appointment of both Andronicus Turner and Jason Lloyd as Regional Sales Managers. The appointments follow several other key additions to the Vicon team. Vicon is expanding rapidly to address escalating demand as end-users seek a reliable source of video surveillance and access control technologies fit for today’s highly dynamic environment. Work experience As Regional Sales Manager for California, Nevada, and Hawaii, Vicon was pleased to appoint Andronicus Turner. Turner has an extensive career within the industry and a demonstrated ability to nurture strong relationships with system integrators, dealers, and end-users. Before Vicon, he served as a Regional Sales Representative for Hikvision. Turner studied International Business at California State University, Northridge, and Global Management at the University of Phoenix for Business.  Vicon was also pleased to appoint Jason Lloyd as Regional Sales Manager for Chicago, Northern Illinois, and Wisconsin. Lloyd has over 20 years of experience and expertise working at the dealer and integrator levels. He also brings an extensive technical history to the position, with a degree in Electrical Engineering and roles as Senior Design Engineer and Low Voltage Director. Leadership hires Vicon enable end-users to scale their security with high-performance and extraordinarily flexible security solutions These appointments follow several other recent key leadership hires. This includes Bob Germain, an industry vet who came from Hikvision to become Vicon’s Director of Hardware Management, and Rakesh Sharma, who came from Exacq to spearhead the company’s hardware engineering efforts filling the position of Director of Hardware Engineering. Recent hires also include Leland Jacobson, who serves Vicon as Regional Sales Manager covering Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas, and Bob Kriegisch, who joined Vicon’s U.S. Sales team as Regional Sales Manager covering Delaware, New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania. Security solutions “We are excited to continue our expansion and welcome Andronicus Turner and Jason Lloyd to the Vicon family,” said Bret McGowan, Senior Vice President, Sales, and Marketing. “Together, they bring vast technical knowledge, passion, and dedication that will lend itself immensely to customers and the team. We look forward to expanding Vicon’s security solutions account base in these regions,” added McGowan. “The growth that Vicon has achieved is a testament to its vision, product excellence, and execution,” McGowan continued. “We are excited that each of these individuals joined the Vicon team and share our mission of driving strategy and execution, to enable end-users to scale their security with high-performance and extraordinarily flexible security solutions.”

Vicon launches NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series to provide exceptional quality and performance
Vicon launches NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series to provide exceptional quality and performance

Vicon Industries, Inc., a subsidiary of Cemtrex Inc., designer and manufacturer of video surveillance and access control software, hardware, and components fills the supply gap caused by NDAA compliance and the emerging FCC ban on certain Chinese surveillance cameras and components with a sophisticated portfolio of compliant solutions. Since Congress passed the 2019 National Defence Authorisation Act (NDAA) more than two years ago, many U.S. businesses have been faced with the adversity of removing and replacing numerous components of their security system. National security risks Recently, the Federal Communications Commission proposed a ban on the use of certain telecommunications products and other electronics made by Chinese companies. The order, which cites alleged national security risks, also seeks to forbid future U.S. sales and could revoke prior authorisations. Many companies in the industry kept moving forward selling banned technology" “Prior to the recent FCC ruling, many companies in the industry kept moving forward selling banned technology because it only impacted Federal opportunities. This new FCC ruling is an upheaval event bound to once again cause a major transformation in the industry impacting every space in the market” explained Bret McGowan, Senior Vice President, Sales and Marketing for Vicon. Competitive surveillance technology The ban’s enactment will create many challenges for integrators, specifiers, and end-users. The first, finding compliant and competitive surveillance technology that does not utilise any SoC (System on Chip) components from these now-banned Chinese companies. Once dealers, integrators, and specifiers identify compliant technologies, then price, quality, and time to implement them add to the complexities. As new and stricter laws began taking effect, the engineers at Vicon worked diligently to create a camera line specifically dedicated to solving the issues their government customers and prospective clients were facing. Moreover, they wanted to ensure delivering premium quality cameras at value price points. Delivering exceptional quality Vicon’s NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series is designed to deliver exceptional quality To overcome this challenge, Vicon developed the Roughneck Series. Vicon’s NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series is designed to deliver exceptional quality and performance at competitive pricing. Vicon recognised that to become a potential alternative to these value brands, a new pricing strategy was needed and that’s what Vicon implemented. “Vicon is pleased to have the ability to solve the challenge of compliance with our fully NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series. From vandal-proof micro-domes to robust outdoor domes, these Roughneck cameras include a variety of form factors, making them an ideal solution for any market,” shared Bob Germain, Director, Hardware Product Management, Vicon. Time-consuming installations All Roughneck cameras boast a range of distinctive features, including smart IR, durable IP67/IK10 construction, and smart H.265 encoding to reduce bandwidth and storage costs. For more cutting-edge capabilities, the Pro series adds advanced AI-driven analytics, adaptive IR for clearer images in darkness, and Starlight low-light colour imaging in the 2, 5 and 8MP dome and bullets. Vicon understands the urgency in finding solutions that integrate without stressful time-consuming installations regardless of the VMS. In addition to being certified with most major VMS systems, the Roughneck Camera Series is also ONVIF certified and seamlessly transitions into any video surveillance security operation.

Vicon Industries announce the release of the advanced V1020-WIR-360 multi-sensor camera for day/night surveillance
Vicon Industries announce the release of the advanced V1020-WIR-360 multi-sensor camera for day/night surveillance

Vicon Industries’ V1020-WIR-360 multi-sensor camera is designed to provide users with the straightforward installation while delivering powerful performance and quality. This exceptional camera is comprised of four independently adjustable sensors that eliminate blind spots so that users can monitor extremely wide areas, with just a single IP address and cable. V1020-WIR-360 camera The V1020-WIR-360 camera is a great addition to Vicon’s camera line, providing the widest coverage area. This powerful camera is perfect for indoor and outdoor use such as parking lots, airports, stadiums, correctional facilities, commercial building corridors, warehouses and more. The multi-sensor is available with 5 MP sensors, creating a 20 MP model, providing exceptional image quality The multi-sensor is available with 5 MP sensors, creating a 20 MP model, providing exceptional image quality for any application. Designed for both indoor and outdoor use, this durable, reliable and flexible multi-sensor camera is IK10 rated for vandal protection and IP66 to withstand the toughest of environments. Easy installation and remote configuration These multi-sensor cameras are engineered to save installers’ time, money and frustration. Traditional non-repositionable multi-sensor cameras typically require at least two individuals for installation and tedious manual adjustments of the modules to obtain the desired FOV. The V1020-WIR-360 multi-sensor camera is designed to be effortlessly configured remotely from a PC and eliminate the need of requiring multiple people for an installation. Users are provided with the freedom to change their FOV as needed, without having to worry about manual installation changes. PTZ control and 360º coverage The camera offers presets for 270⁰ or 360⁰ views, along with which, users can also create custom views through each sensor’s independent PTZ control. Additionally, they can also save up to two user-defined presets, with each camera module independently positioned and zoomed as required, providing optimal surveillance. The 270º view is commonly used in corners, such as the corner of a building. Typical installation practice for a 270º setup is to mount on the corner of a building, allowing users to view directly in-front of them and to their left and right. The fourth sensor can then be positioned as desired to provide additional coverage such as looking straight down to eliminate blind spots. Integration with Valerus and other VMS platforms The ONVIF-compliant multi-sensor cameras integrate with most major VMS platforms and Vicon’s acclaimed Valerus A 360º is ideal for wide areas and is typically mounted to a pole and used in settings such as intersections and parking lots. This view’s FOV takes all angles, also eliminating the potential of any blind spots. The ONVIF-compliant multi-sensor cameras integrate with most major VMS platforms and Vicon’s acclaimed Valerus. When integrated with Valerus, the multi-sensor camera also supports Museum Search to streamline security investigations. Starlight technology for exceptional colour images These powerful cameras also deliver fantastic detail, day or night. With True WDR, the cameras can overcome challenging lighting conditions during the day, while 131 ft of IR illumination ensures that users can see every detail, even in the darkness of the night. The standout feature of this multi-sensor camera, when compared to the competition, is the advanced starlight imaging capabilities. Starlight illumination allows users to see vivid colours and sharp details that would otherwise go unnoticed. Operators can see critical forensic details that they would otherwise miss in traditional IR black-and-white images. PoE source The camera can be powered by 24 VAC, 24 VDC or with either IEEE 802.3at (PoE+) or IEEE 802.3bt Class 5 (PoE++) Power over Ethernet. The PoE source is automatically detected with the only performance difference being the IR distance of up to 131 ft (40 m) on PoE++ and up to 98 ft (30 m) on PoE+.

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