CCTV cameras - Expert commentary

Remote Monitoring technology: Tackling South Africa’s cable theft problem
Remote Monitoring technology: Tackling South Africa’s cable theft problem

For decades, cable theft has caused disruption to infrastructure across South Africa, and an issue that permeates the whole supply chain. Here, Ian Loudon, international sales and marketing manager at remote monitoring specialist Omniflex, explains how new cable-alarm technology is making life difficult for criminals and giving hope to businesses. In November 2020, Nasdaq reported that, “When South Africa shut large parts of its economy and transport network during its COVID-19 lockdown, organised, sometimes armed, gangs moved into its crumbling stations to steal the valuable copper from the lines. Now, more than two months after that lockdown ended, the commuter rail system, relied on by millions of commuters, is barely operational.” Private security firm Despite this most recent incident, cable theft is not a new phenomenon to sweep South Africa Despite this most recent incident, cable theft is not a new phenomenon to sweep South Africa. In 2001, SABC TV broadcast a story following two members of a private security firm working for Telkom, a major telecoms provider. In the segment, the two guards, working in Amanzimtoti on the south coast of KwaZulu-Natal, head out to investigate a nearby alarm that has been triggered. They reach a telecoms cabinet and discover that it has been compromised, with the copper cable cut and telephone handsets strewn across the ground. In the dark, they continue to search the area when one of the guards discovers the problem: 500 metres of copper wire has been ripped out. In their haste, the thieves have dropped their loot and fled. Widespread cable theft Had they managed to get away, they would have melted the cable to remove the plastic insulation and sold the copper to a local scrap dealer for around 900 Rand, about $50 US dollars. For the company whose infrastructure has been compromised, it may cost ten times that amount to replace and repair the critical infrastructure. The disappointing takeaway from this story is that two decades on from this incident the country still faces widespread cable theft, whether it’s copper cables from mines, pipelines, railways, telecoms or electrical utilities. In fact, the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry estimates that cable theft costs the economy between R5–7 billion a year. The answer to the problem must go further than the existing measures used by companies. Detect power failure Most businesses already invest in CCTV, fences, barriers and even patrol guards, but this is not enough. Take the mining sector, for example. These sites can be vast, spanning dozens of kilometres - it’s simply not cost effective to install enough fences or employ enough guards or camera operators. As monitoring technology gets better, the company has seen site managers increasingly use cable alarms in recent years that detect when a power failure occurs. The idea is that, if one can detect a power failure, they can detect whether the cable has been cut The idea is that, if one can detect a power failure, they can detect whether the cable has been cut. The problem is though: how does one distinguish the difference between a situation where a cable has been cut intentionally and a genuine power outage? Power outages in South Africa are an ongoing problem, with the country contending with an energy deficit since late 2005, leading to around 6,000 MW of power cuts in 2019. Remote terminal units Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd., the company that generates around 95 per cent of South Africa’s power has already warned of further blackouts as the company works to carry out repairs to its power plants. According to a statement on the company’s website, “Eskom spends in the region of R2 billion a year replacing stolen copper cables." The result is that criminals take advantage of the gaps in power to steal cable, timing their robberies to coincide with the published load shedding schedules. The basic alarms used to detect power outage won’t recognise the theft because they register a false-positive during a power cut. By the time the power comes back on, the deed has been done and the criminals have gotten away with the cable. The good news is that recent breakthroughs in cable monitoring technology are helping tackle just this problem. New alarms on the market now combine sophisticated GSM-based monitoring systems that use battery powered remote terminal units. Legitimate supply chain Unlike the basic alarms that look for the presence or absence of power, these new systems monitor whether the cable circuit is in an open or closed state. In the event of a power outage, the unit continues to run on battery power and can detect if a cable has been cut, sending a priority SMS alert to the site manager immediately, giving them a fighting chance to prevent a robbery in progress. Beyond the opportunistic theft carried out by petty criminals, the theft of copper cables forms a wider problem Beyond the opportunistic theft carried out by petty criminals, the theft of copper cables forms a wider problem across the supply chain in South Africa. In recent years, the combination of unscrupulous scrap dealers, the alleged involvement of large scrap processing companies and lax penalties meant that much of the stolen copper ended up back in the legitimate supply chain. However, recent changes in the law have sought to take a tougher stance on copper theft. Alarm monitoring technology According to the Western Cape Government, “The Criminal Matters Amendment Act, regulates bail and imposes minimum offences for essential infrastructure-related offences." The act, which came into effect in 2018, recommends sentencing for cable theft, with the minimum sentence for first-time offenders being three years and for those who are involved in instigating or causing damage to infrastructure, the maximum sentence is thirty years. It seems to be working too. In January 2021, the South African reported that a Johannesburg man was sentenced to eight years behind bars for cable theft in Turffontein. While the longer-term outlook is a positive one for industry, the best advice for businesses seeking to alleviate the problem of cable theft in the immediate future is to invest in the latest cable-theft alarm monitoring technology to tackle the problem and make life difficult for criminals.

We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?
We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?

While the application of facial recognition within both public and private spheres continues to draw criticism from those who see it as a threat to civil rights, this technology has become extremely commonplace in the lives of iPhone users. It is so prevalent, in fact, that by 2024 it is predicted that 90% of smartphones will use biometric facial recognition hardware. CCTV surveillance cameras  Similarly, CCTV is a well-established security measure that many of us are familiar with, whether through spotting images displayed on screens in shops, hotels and offices, or noticing cameras on the side of buildings. It is therefore necessary we ask the question of why, when facial recognition is integrated with security surveillance technology, does it become such a source of contention? It is not uncommon for concerns to be voiced against innovation. History has taught us that it is human nature to fear the unknown, especially if it seems that it may change life as we know it. Yet technology is an ever-changing, progressive part of the 21st century and it is important we start to shift the narrative away from privacy threats, to the force for good that LFR (Live Facial Recognition) represents. Live Facial Recognition (LFR) We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition Across recent weeks, we have seen pleas from UK organisations to allow better police access to facial recognition technology in order to fight crime. In the US, there are reports that LAPD is the latest police force to be properly regulating its use of facial recognition to aid criminal investigations, which is certainly a step in the right direction. While it is understandable that society fears technology that they do not yet understand, this lack of knowledge is exactly why the narrative needs to shift. We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition, we respect these anxieties. However, it is time to level the playing field of the facial recognition debate and communicate the plethora of benefits it offers society. Facial recognition technology - A force for good Facial recognition technology has already reached such a level of maturity and sophistication that there are huge opportunities for it to be leveraged as a force for good in real-world scenarios. As well as making society safer and more secure, I would go as far to say that LFR is able to save lives. One usage that could have a dramatic effect on reducing stress in people with mental conditions is the ability for facial recognition to identify those with Alzheimer’s. If an older individual is seemingly confused, lost or distressed, cameras could alert local medical centres or police stations of their identity, condition and where they need to go (a home address or a next of kin contact). Granted, this usage would be one that does incorporate a fair bit of personal data, although this information would only be gathered with consent from each individual. Vulnerable people could volunteer their personal data to local watchlists in order to ensure their safety when out in society, as well as to allow quicker resolutions of typically stressful situations. Tracking and finding missing persons Another possibility for real world positives to be drawn from facial recognition is to leverage the technology to help track or find missing persons, a lost child for instance. The most advanced forms of LFR in the market are now able to recognise individuals even if up to 50% of their face is covered and from challenging or oblique angles. Therefore, there is a significant opportunity not only to return people home safely, more quickly, but also reduce police hours spent on analysing CCTV footage. Rapid scanning of images Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match, as a more reliable and less time-consuming option than the human alternative. Freed-up officers could also then work more proactively on the ground, patrolling their local areas and increasing community safety and security twofold. It is important to understand that these facial recognition solutions should not be applied to every criminal case, and the technology must be used responsibly. However, these opportunities to use LFR as force for good are undeniable.   Debunking the myths One of the central concerns around LFR is the breach of privacy that is associated with ‘watchlists’. There is a common misconception, however, that the data of every individual that passes a camera is processed and then stored. The reality is that watch lists are compiled with focus on known criminals, while the general public can continue life as normal. The very best facial recognition will effectively view a stream of blurred faces, until it detects one that it has been programmed to recognise. For example, an individual that has previously shoplifted from a local supermarket may have their biometric data stored, so when they return to that location the employees are alerted to a risk of further crimes being committed. Considering that the cost of crime prevention to retailers in recent years has been around £1 billion, which therefore impacts consumer prices and employee wages, security measures to tackle this issue are very much in the public interest. Most importantly, the average citizen has no need to fear being ‘followed’ by LFR cameras. If data is stored, it is for a maximum of 0.6 seconds before being deleted. Privacy Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story. It is essential we spend more time and effort communicating exactly why watchlists are made, who they are made for and how they are being used, if we want to de-bunk myths and change the narrative. As science and technology professionals, heading up this exciting innovation, we must put transparency and accountability at the centre of what we do. Tony Porter, former Surveillance Camera Commissioner and current CPO at Corsight AI, has previously worked on developing processes that audit and review watch lists. Such restrictions are imperative in order for AI and LFR to be used legally, as well as ethically and responsibly. Biometrics, mask detection and contactless payments Nevertheless, the risks do not outweigh the benefits. Facial recognition should and can be used for good in so many more ways than listed above, including biometric, contactless payments, detecting whether an individual is wearing a facemask and is therefore, safe to enter a building, identifying a domestic abuse perpetrator returning to the scene of a crime and alerting police. There are even opportunities for good that we have not thought of yet. It is therefore not only a waste not to use this technology where we can, prioritising making society a safer place, it is immoral to stand by and let crimes continue while we have effective, reliable mitigation solutions.  

Securing empty premises: Product performance is everything
Securing empty premises: Product performance is everything

Since the start of the pandemic, almost a quarter of UK businesses have been forced to temporarily close, pause trading, or work remotely, with very little notice. Now nearing the 12th month of the crisis, the country is currently enduring its third national lockdown, with an unspecified timeframe. Most workers are being urged to remain at home and only venture out for essential travel. This means a huge number of premises across the board, from recreational venues such as theatres, pubs and leisure centres, to office buildings, and storage facilities, will remain empty. It’s likely that security has been scaled back, so many buildings could be vulnerable to attack for the foreseeable future. Just recently we’ve seen empty pubs in London targeted by opportunistic illegal rave organisers. Physical security strategy Even rural areas aren’t exempt from the problem, as burglars have reportedly targeted beauty salons, etc Even rural areas aren’t exempt from the problem, as burglars have reportedly targeted beauty salons, food stores and vehicle hire premises this winter. Vandalism and burglary remain very real threats, therefore it is vital that facilities managers and property owners ensure the physical security of these empty buildings is maintained to the highest standard to protect property and the assets within. Below we outline key considerations when evaluating a physical security strategy for an empty building. Assess the risk We would urge facilities managers and building owners to carry out regular, thorough checks of the building and the perimeter to assess any obvious factors which would elevate the risk of attack. This includes assessing the location. Is the crime rate high? How visible is the property? Are the contents of the property on show? How secure is the access or perimeter boundary? View the premises from a potential intruder’s perspective, and when you can’t be at the site in person, use photographs, notes and drawings to identify potential weaknesses. For example, there may be high security fencing at the front of the premises, but make sure it is not at risk of being compromised at the back. Conducting regular maintenance Retain and maintain quality Inspecting the fence line may seem obvious and straightforward, but it needs to be a deliberate, scheduled event Conducting regular maintenance is even more essential while premises are left empty, as it is much easier for any issues to appear and escalate undetected. We highly recommend regularly inspecting your fencing for disrepair or damage as this can affect the perimeter’s integrity. Alternatively, choosing high quality galvanised and preferably powder coated steel fencing with a 25-year guarantee will offer longer-lasting protection against rust and corrosion. Inspecting the fence line may seem obvious and straightforward, but it needs to be a deliberate, scheduled event. Take time to check the perimeter on both sides. As you inspect the fencing, keep an eye out for any attempted breaches and note if foliage, weather conditions, or topography changes have affected security integrity. Check all fixtures and fittings are in good working order, look for damage and corrosion, and clear all litter and debris away. Huge security risk Quality investments In a time when businesses are already stretched, it can be tempting to opt for quick, inexpensive fixes. However, poorly executed design or cheap, low quality products can lead to costly, long-term remediation or worse, significant loss to the business. Make wise, informed decisions and specify solutions based on your organisation’s security needs first and foremost. While generic steel palisade is a popular option, owing to its intimidating aesthetic, it is easily compromised. Steel palisade fencing has inherent weaknesses that undermine performance. Its wide pales can obstruct surveillance, while the bolted construction is a huge security risk. Simply removing or breaking the lower fixing on one or two pales would allow them to swing aside to give repeated access to the site without leaving an easily visible sign that the perimeter has been breached. It’s a false economy, as the initial lower price is offset by the costs and inconvenience incurred by regular repairs. Performance classification system The standard works via a performance classification system, and even considers the tools that an intruder may use Specifying a higher quality product that’s fit for purpose makes more sense both in the short and long term, and it adds little to the original cost. Fortunately, there are a number of security accreditations that facilities managers and building owners can refer to when specifying security measures at their site, helping them choose effective solutions to combat the risks the property faces. Proven performance Certifications and approvals, such as The Loss Prevention Certification Board’s (LPCB) LPS 1175 and the British Standards Institution’s (BSI) PAS, prove a product has been thoroughly tested to a specific standard. They prove the strength and durability of the item in multiple different situations. It is worth noting also that investing in effective perimeter protection can actually deliver a positive return by reducing the incidence of burglary and vandalism, and their associated costs. The technical evaluation work carried out by LPCB is extremely thorough. The product is subjected to rigorous quality audit processes, to certify the security products tested by BRE deliver verified levels of protection. All LPS 1175 rated products are vigorously tested before receiving an accreditation. The standard works via a performance classification system, and even considers the tools that an intruder may use. Intrusion detection system Our law enforcement teams are stretched to capacity and coping with reduced workforces due to illness By predicting a likely toolset, specifiers can construct multiple defensive layers to maximise how much time a facility has to respond to an attack. Different levels of security are crucial for the ‘5D defence’ concept, whereby a quintet of security assets work together to prevent access to your site, resulting in a strategy that will: Deter, Detect, Deny, Delay and Defend unwanted access from intruders. 360° security There is no single solution when it comes to securing a building. Every situation must be considered on an individual basis, starting with a full risk assessment. We recommend an integrated approach where appropriate. Along with a secure perimeter, this might also include effective lighting in shaded areas and at doors, gates, and vulnerable windows, Perimeter Intrusion Detection Systems (PIDS) and well-placed CCTV. These measures can hinder entry and escape, or increase the chance of discovery and detection. Domestic burglaries While domestic burglaries have become less attractive as many of our homes are now occupied around the clock, commercial properties have become increasingly more vulnerable. Our law enforcement teams are stretched to capacity and coping with reduced workforces due to isolating and illness. Therefore it has never been so important for building owners and facilities managers to assess the properties they’re responsible for to ensure they’re protected effectively in the event of an attack.

Latest Hanwha Techwin Europe news

Hanwha Techwin expands Wisenet X PTZ PLUS range of cameras equipped with AI object tracking
Hanwha Techwin expands Wisenet X PTZ PLUS range of cameras equipped with AI object tracking

The six new cameras added to the Wisenet X PTZ PLUS range have been developed by Hanwha Techwin to enable users to capture evidence grade images of activity occurring in large open area applications. The ability of the new 2MP, 6MP and 4K Wisenet X PTZ PLUS cameras to operate effectively in environments such as airports, car parks, industrial estates, stadia and city centres, is enhanced by a long list of technically advanced features, which include AI-based object tracking, precise PTZ control and improved pre-set accuracy. The cameras, which have a lightweight, compact form factor, are also able to capture high-quality images of objects up to a distance of 200 metres regardless of the lighting conditions, with the help of adaptive IR technology which adjusts the angle of the camera’s IR LEDs to match the level of zoom. AI auto-tracking Operators can programme a camera to lock onto and auto-track a specific object with the help of deep learning video analytics An AI auto-tracking feature allows control room operators to efficiently monitor the movement of objects while remaining hands-free to control other cameras. With a right-click of a mouse, operators can programme a camera to lock onto and auto-track a specific object. It does so with the help of deep learning video analytics which detects and classifies people and vehicles. The video analytics is supported by AI algorithms unique to Hanwha Techwin. Alternatively, operators can take advantage of highly accurate manual control PTZ functionality to zoom in to see close up detail of target objects and track their movement. Other key features and functions Pre-set Accuracy: During their life cycle, most PTZ cameras are likely to be expected to ‘pan and tilt’ many thousands of times and it is not unknown for positioning errors to occur. Wisenet PTZ PLUS cameras, which have a pre-set accuracy of ±0.1˚, are able to detect if they are not precisely aimed at the specified field of view and will move within one second to the correct position. Focus Save: Applied to up to 32 pre-defined areas, focus save functionality ensures that regardless of the lighting conditions, a camera is able to rapidly come into focus when it is moved to a new position. Tilt Range: The cameras’ extended tilt range of up to 110⁰ allows any objects positioned above the cameras to be seen. Wisenet7 chipset At the heart of all Wisenet X PTZ PLUS cameras is Wisenet7, Hanwha Techwin’s most powerful chipset to date, which with extreme’ Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) functionality that utilises Local Contrast Enhancement and Scene Analysis technologies, is able to facilitate the capture of ultra-clear images from scenes containing a challenging mix of bright and dark areas. Excellent low light performance is also assured thanks to the utilisation of 3D noise reduction technology which, while minimising motion blur, uses several filters to isolate and remove pixels that are causing noise, while a new noise reduction algorithm improves the edge and colour of objects. Cyber secure Wisenet7 chipset incorporates a list of technologies that significantly enhance the cyber security credentials Complying with UL CAP and Secure by Default standards, the Wisenet7 chipset also incorporates an impressive list of ground-breaking technologies that significantly enhance the cyber security credentials of the Wisenet PTZ PLUS cameras. They also benefit from a Hanwha Techwin proprietary device certificate issuing system which embeds unique certificates into Wisenet products during both the development phase and manufacturing process. This further enhances the camera’s ability to prevent hackers from tampering with its firmware. Installer friendly Compact and approximately 65% lighter than most PTZ domes, the camera-mount installed Wisenet X PTZ PLUS cameras can be quickly and easily deployed, requiring engineers during a first fix to just ‘match 3 points and twist’. This conveniently enables them to tighten screws without having to hold onto the camera. Unlike conventional PTZ cameras which require up to 5 separate cables, the Wisenet X PTZ PLUS cameras only need a single RJ45 cable to operate and this is installed with a flexible bush to ensure the camera is waterproof. The new Wisenet PTZ PLUS cameras are as follows: Wisenet XNP-9250: 4K 25x PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-9250R: 4K 25x IR PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-8250: 6MP 25x PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-8250R: 6MP 25x IR PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-6400: 2MP 40x PTZ camera Wisenet XNP-6400R: 2MP 40x IR PTZ camera Authority comments “Our comprehensive Wisenet camera line-up offers a variety of options for monitoring wide open areas. However, I would encourage consultants, system designers and system integrators to take a close look at our PTZ PLUS range when there is a need to closely monitor and automatically track moving people or vehicles,” said Uri Guterman, Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. “Our design, development and manufacturing teams have combined their expertise to pack these cameras with a long list of practical features and innovative technology which collectively will surely meet, if not exceed, users’ expectations.”

Hanwha adds Wisenet PNM-9022V and Wisenet PNM-9322VQP to their range of multi-directional cameras
Hanwha adds Wisenet PNM-9022V and Wisenet PNM-9322VQP to their range of multi-directional cameras

Two new Wisenet cameras equipped with Hanwha Techwin’s ground-breaking Wisenet7 chipset have reinforced the company’s claim to be the manufacturer of multi-directional cameras.  The 4-channel PNM-9022V utilises alpha blending technology to stitch the overlapping images captured by its four Full HD sensors into a seamless 8.3-megapixel 209° image, thus ensuring an operator never loses sight of a person or vehicle moving across a wide area. Digital PTZ functionality Superseding the highly successful Wisenet PNM-9020V, the PNM-9022V can also be used to capture 180° images, with operators able to take advantage of digital PTZ functionality across two of the camera’s channels. With Wisenet7 SoC, Hanwha Techwin’s most powerful chipset to date, at its heart, the PNM-9022V’s 4 sensors, which come with 2.8mm fixed focal lenses, are able to capture high definition colour images when the lighting level is as low as 0.03 Lux. Wisenet7 also features Hanwha Techwin proprietary ‘extreme’ Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) technology which, performing at up to 120dB, utilises new Local Contrast Enhancement and Scene Analysis technologies to enable the camera to capture ultra-clear images from scenes containing a challenging mix of bright and dark areas. Certificate issuing system Lens Distortion Correction (LDC) technology utilised by the PNM-9022V corrects the distortion created Lens Distortion Correction (LDC) technology utilised by the PNM-9022V corrects the distortion created through the use of wide-angle lenses. This delivers images which more closely resemble what is seen through the human eye. As part of the fast-growing number of new cameras which incorporate the UL CAP certificated Wisenet7 chipset, the National Defence Authorization Act (NDAA) compliant PNM-9022V is packed with an impressive list of technologies to protect it from cyber-attacks. It also benefits from a Hanwha Techwin proprietary device certificate issuing system, which embeds unique certificates into Wisenet7 products during both the development phase and manufacturing process. This further enhances the camera’s ability to prevent hackers from tampering with its firmware. Cable connection purposes 2 Micro SD/SDHC/SDXC slots enable up to 1TB of video or data to be stored at the edge should there be disruption to the network. Video of any incidents, which potentially might have been lost on the recorder side, can therefore be retrieved from the camera when the network connection has been restored. Minimising the time needed to be spent on site, the PNM-9022V has a hinged backplate to provide easy access for cable connection purposes. Installers have to simply install the back plate, clip the camera in place and tighten two screws. Intelligent video analytics Other key features include the following: A suite of built-in Intelligent Video Analytics (IVA), which includes audio detection, defocus detection, directional detection, enter/exit, appear/disappear, motion detection, virtual line and camera tampering detection. Heatmap video analytics which provides business intelligence on customer density and buying behaviour. Support for WiseStream II complementary compression technology, as well as H.265, H.264 and MJPEG compression formats. Bandwidth efficiency is improved by up to 75% compared to current H.264 technology, when WiseStream II is combined with H.265 compression. PoE+ which negates the need to install a power supply and separate cabling for the camera. IP66, IK10 and NEMA4X rated for protection against water, dust and mechanical impact. Cost-effective solution Coinciding with the launch of the PNM-9022V, the PNM-9322VQP with 4 sensors and an integral PTZ camera, is designed to provide a highly cost-effective solution for detecting and tracking objects over wide open areas. The option of exchangeable 2 and 5-megapixel lens modules enables the camera’s sensors to work together to seamlessly capture 360° images of up to 20-megapixel resolution. In addition, the device’s PTZ camera element can be configured to zoom in and track a moving object or move to a user defined preset position when the line crossing detection function of the multi-directional camera detects activity. It is also able to ‘hand-over’ to cameras covering adjacent areas to ensure operators can continue to observe people or vehicles as they move out of its field of view. Providing audio support The NDAA compliant PNM-9322VQP supersedes the highly successful PNM-9320VQP Equipped with the Wisenet7 chipset, the NDAA compliant PNM-9322VQP supersedes the highly successful PNM-9320VQP, with the additional benefit of providing audio support. “These two new models perfectly complement our other existing 2, 3, 4 and 5-channel multi-sensor cameras which collectively enable us to offer customers an affordable multi-directional camera solution for virtually any video surveillance project,” said Uri Guterman, Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. Providing significant savings “All of these cameras will help users achieve a high return on investment (ROI) as they can perform the role of a greater number of standard HD cameras. In doing so, they provide significant savings on camera purchasing costs and with less cable, conduit, mounting hardware and network switches required, installation costs are reduced as well. With only a single IP connection, they also only require one VMS licence.” “The value of these two new cameras being NDAA compliant and UL CAP certificated should also not be underestimated. System integrators will quite often find that both can be a key requirement when they are submitting tenders for projects involving end-users which operate multi-nationally.”

Hanwha Techwin launches Wisenet Public View Monitors with built-in camera
Hanwha Techwin launches Wisenet Public View Monitors with built-in camera

A new range of Wisenet Public View Monitors (PVMs) equipped with a built-in SSL connected 2-megapixel camera have been introduced to help retailers deter fraudsters and shoplifters. Offering a choice of 10”, 27” and 32” monitors, the 3 new PVMs are designed to be located at store entrances, shopping aisles, till points or self-checkout pay points. With an SD/SDHC/SDXC slot that can facilitate up to 512GB of data storage, the PVMs provide store management with the opportunity to display a slide show which can include supplier adverts, own-brand product promotions and special offers. A default blinking recording in progress message is superimposed over the displayed graphics to let would be thieves know they are on camera, with operators having the option to customise the message and configure its size, colour, opaqueness and positioning on the monitor. Face detection Face and motion detection feature can be configured to switch the display to live view to make people aware they are being watched Supported by the Wisenet WAVE and SSM video management platforms as well as Wisenet NVRs, the ONVIF Conformant PVMs can be programmed so that images captured by the cameras are either continuously recorded or when prompted to do so by built-in face or motion detection video analytics. The face and motion detection feature can also be configured to switch the display to live view to make people aware they are being watched, as they will be able to see themselves on the monitor as they enter a store or walk down a shopping aisle. The display reverts to the slide show after a specified number of seconds. The PVMs, which can be integrated with tagging (EAS) systems to record images of people who might be leaving the store with stolen items, also provide support for the AI-Masking, AI-Bio, AI-Face-Detect and AI-Occupancy video analytics applications, developed by Hanwha Techwin’s technology partner, A.I. Tech. Video evidence Regardless of whether they are displaying live images or a slide show, or the monitor has been turned off by someone using a remote control, the PVMs will continuously stream images to a control room where they can be viewed via video management software (VMS), as well as continue to be recorded on an on-site or remotely located NVR. The ultra-low light capabilities of the new PVMs, together with Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) technology performing at up to 150dB, enables the built-in camera to capture clear, sharp images in strongly contrasting light conditions at, for example, store entrances where strong sunlight may be streaming in. Power over Ethernet All three PVMs can be powered by 12V DC, with the Wisenet SMT-1030PV also offering the option to utilise Power over Ethernet (PoE+) if there isn’t an existing power supply close to where the PVM is being installed. A single cable of up to 100m is all that is needed to provide both powers to the SMT-1030PV and for network communications. The three new Wisenet PVMs, which can be mounted by using standard VESA brackets, are as follows: SMT-1030PV: 10” monitor with LED backlight and 1024 x 600 display resolution. SMT-2730PV: 27” monitor with LED backlight, HDMI input and Full HD display. SMT-3230PV: 32” monitor with LED backlight, HDMI input and Full HD display. Loss prevention strategy “With retailers increasingly relying on PVMs to play an important role within their strategic approach to loss prevention, we have designed our new models to make it quick and easy, as well as cost-effective, to deploy them across a large number of stores,” said Uri Guterman, Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. “As the only PVMs available which, for cyber security and data protection purposes, are supplied with a complete built-in SSL connected camera, they eliminate the need for system integrators to install and connect a separate supporting camera, which some other manufacturers’ PVMs require." "By building in an intuitive user interface, we have also made it extremely easy for busy store managers to take full advantage of the PVM’s functionality, including the ability to utilise the monitor for advertisement and signage using the slide show mode.”

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