Upgrade access control systems with a completely cable-free, even more cost-effective solution – Aperio® Offline
Upgrade access control systems with a completely cable-free, even more cost-effective solution – Aperio® Offline

Aperio® Offline access control doors now allow access control system manufacturers (OEMs) and system integrators to offer even more favourably priced solutions, thus creating a competitive advantage for themselves. All they need to do is integrate Aperio® components into their system, an easy task. Aperio® Offline is particularly suitable for doors which cannot be wired, are used very little or are a distance away from other doors. Very easy to install, an Aperio® Offline cylinder or escutcheon is mounted onto the door and then integrated into the access control system. Access authorisations are saved onto existing RFID user cards or transponders. Doors are all managed using the same access control system, whether they feature Aperio® Offline or Online. Users receive new or modified access authorisations from a central point. One special feature in Aperio® Offline is its status message capability used to indicate low battery status or a jammed lock and transmit other door signals to the access control system via the cards or transponders. This allows system maintenance to rectify faults or replace batteries within a short space of time. Lost user cards and transponders can be cancelled by placing them on a blacklist or become automatically invalid after a specific period of time. Able to support up to 16 time schedules, Aperio® Offline also offers a permanently open mode (office mode) and door status change (toggle mode). For customers or end-users, the greatest advantage lies in the fact that they can now choose the right access control system for every door scenario. Regardless of whether the door is Aperio® Online or Offline, both can be administered using the same access control system.  Aperio® Offline cylinders or escutcheons can also be easily used for Aperio® Online if operators wish to integrate a door into an online system at a later date. In such a case, the door is incorporated into the access control system via a wireless communications hub, thus providing a favourably priced, non-wired, online solution.

Add to Compare
ASSA ABLOY Aperio®: Increase your data centre security with cost-effective access
ASSA ABLOY Aperio®: Increase your data centre security with cost-effective access

Who is accessing your company’s most sensitive data? Where? When? And if someone without authorisation did, how would you know? Some of the world’s best-known companies have succumbed to data breaches that proved expensive in terms of both cost and reputation. The focus is usually on a digital attack. Passwords and anti-hacking procedures come under scrutiny, particularly in a world where so much of our information lives in the cloud. However, there is another way that company data can fall into unauthorised hands: someone could walk right up to your server and access it physically, with equally disruptive results. Shared data centres The risks increase when companies use shared data centres, or ”colocation”, which has become an increasingly popular option. According to 451 Research KnowledgeBase, the global colocation market could grow from $23 billion in 2014 to $37 billion by 2017. All our “big data” has to go somewhere and shared data centres provide a cost-effective solution, even for information of the most sensitive kind. Of course, data centres have stringent security procedures, but is it wise to fully entrust your valuable data -sensitive customer information- to a third party? Can you be certain that a third party’s security procedures meet your legal compliance commitments, to the European Data Protection Directive, the Sarbanes–Oxley Act, the PCI Data Security Standard and other personal and commercial data protection regulations? Further, do you even know who you share server space with? It could be a direct competitor. Disruption of physical security and potential breach as a result may not even be deliberate or malicious. Server rooms have a steady flow of authorised traffic: cleaners, maintenance staff, repair technicians and more. Unfortunately, accidents happen. Data centre security management For these reasons, data centre security management needs to be high on any company’s agenda, as high as cyber-security. In an interview with datacenterknowledge.com, Jason Cook, CTO of BT Americas, suggested: “Physical security is still one of the easiest ways to get access to data. With all of the sophistication in current technology, what’s the point, if someone can walk in and open the door?” IBM estimates the average cost of a single data breach at $3.79 million. Fortunately, technologies that can help secure servers—even in colocation data centres—cost a lot less than that. A high-security mechanical lock might seem like a solution, but a mechanical system can be expensive to run, due to the costs of secure key management and replacement when keys go missing. Once issued, there’s no way to change a physical key’s user rights. A mechanical-key audit trail- who had access to your servers, when, for how long- will probably not be enough to conduct a proper investigation in the event of any type of breach. Even high-security perimeter doors and CCTV-powered server room security will not suffice, if your server rack has an old-fashioned mechanical lock. Server cabinet locks are the last line of defence against a physical breach, yet mechanical keys are still a common sight in data centres. This is becoming increasingly unsatisfactory, especially when that server could hold the key to your business success. KS100 Server Cabinet Lock One solution is ASSA ABLOY’s Aperio® KS100 Server Cabinet Lock. The KS100 adds real-time access control capabilities to a server cabinet, drawer or rack. It brings server racks into an existing third-party access control system, without breaking the bank. KS100 electronic locks work with smartcards using all standard RFID technologies, including iCLASS® from HID, Seos™, MIFARE® and DESFire. Installation is quick and easy, with power via a Power over Ethernet (PoE) connection. Once installed, KS100 locks integrate with your access control system and communicate wirelessly through an Aperio® Communication Hub. With online integration, when any of your smart credentials is presented to the lock, access decisions are communicated from and recorded by the system wirelessly. With Aperio®, lost cabinet keys no longer compromise server security: smart credentials are simply de-authorised and a valid replacement can be quickly re-issued. The current status of any lock can be revealed with the click of a mouse. Generating detailed audit trails is straightforward, making the KS100 invaluable for incident investigation. With Aperio® server cabinet locks, businesses have the freedom to manage access to their own equipment and data, even in colocation data centres. Do you know exactly who last had access to your servers, and when? Install Aperio® and next time your data manager asks, the answer is yes. Key facts The data centre colocation market could be worth $37 billion by 2017 Companies have a legal requirement to protect sensitive customer data, under the European Data Protection Directive and other regulations Investigating any breach properly requires detailed audit trails, which mechanical keys cannot provide An Aperio® KS100 Server Cabinet Lock can integrate with an installed access control system, boosting security wirelessly and adding full audit trail capabilities to server space, even in shared data centres For more on how Aperio® can secure a data centre, see www.assaabloy.co.uk/securedata.

Add to Compare

Access control systems & kits - Expert commentary

We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?
We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?

While the application of facial recognition within both public and private spheres continues to draw criticism from those who see it as a threat to civil rights, this technology has become extremely commonplace in the lives of iPhone users. It is so prevalent, in fact, that by 2024 it is predicted that 90% of smartphones will use biometric facial recognition hardware. CCTV surveillance cameras  Similarly, CCTV is a well-established security measure that many of us are familiar with, whether through spotting images displayed on screens in shops, hotels and offices, or noticing cameras on the side of buildings. It is therefore necessary we ask the question of why, when facial recognition is integrated with security surveillance technology, does it become such a source of contention? It is not uncommon for concerns to be voiced against innovation. History has taught us that it is human nature to fear the unknown, especially if it seems that it may change life as we know it. Yet technology is an ever-changing, progressive part of the 21st century and it is important we start to shift the narrative away from privacy threats, to the force for good that LFR (Live Facial Recognition) represents. Live Facial Recognition (LFR) We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition Across recent weeks, we have seen pleas from UK organisations to allow better police access to facial recognition technology in order to fight crime. In the US, there are reports that LAPD is the latest police force to be properly regulating its use of facial recognition to aid criminal investigations, which is certainly a step in the right direction. While it is understandable that society fears technology that they do not yet understand, this lack of knowledge is exactly why the narrative needs to shift. We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition, we respect these anxieties. However, it is time to level the playing field of the facial recognition debate and communicate the plethora of benefits it offers society. Facial recognition technology - A force for good Facial recognition technology has already reached such a level of maturity and sophistication that there are huge opportunities for it to be leveraged as a force for good in real-world scenarios. As well as making society safer and more secure, I would go as far to say that LFR is able to save lives. One usage that could have a dramatic effect on reducing stress in people with mental conditions is the ability for facial recognition to identify those with Alzheimer’s. If an older individual is seemingly confused, lost or distressed, cameras could alert local medical centres or police stations of their identity, condition and where they need to go (a home address or a next of kin contact). Granted, this usage would be one that does incorporate a fair bit of personal data, although this information would only be gathered with consent from each individual. Vulnerable people could volunteer their personal data to local watchlists in order to ensure their safety when out in society, as well as to allow quicker resolutions of typically stressful situations. Tracking and finding missing persons Another possibility for real world positives to be drawn from facial recognition is to leverage the technology to help track or find missing persons, a lost child for instance. The most advanced forms of LFR in the market are now able to recognise individuals even if up to 50% of their face is covered and from challenging or oblique angles. Therefore, there is a significant opportunity not only to return people home safely, more quickly, but also reduce police hours spent on analysing CCTV footage. Rapid scanning of images Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match, as a more reliable and less time-consuming option than the human alternative. Freed-up officers could also then work more proactively on the ground, patrolling their local areas and increasing community safety and security twofold. It is important to understand that these facial recognition solutions should not be applied to every criminal case, and the technology must be used responsibly. However, these opportunities to use LFR as force for good are undeniable.   Debunking the myths One of the central concerns around LFR is the breach of privacy that is associated with ‘watchlists’. There is a common misconception, however, that the data of every individual that passes a camera is processed and then stored. The reality is that watch lists are compiled with focus on known criminals, while the general public can continue life as normal. The very best facial recognition will effectively view a stream of blurred faces, until it detects one that it has been programmed to recognise. For example, an individual that has previously shoplifted from a local supermarket may have their biometric data stored, so when they return to that location the employees are alerted to a risk of further crimes being committed. Considering that the cost of crime prevention to retailers in recent years has been around £1 billion, which therefore impacts consumer prices and employee wages, security measures to tackle this issue are very much in the public interest. Most importantly, the average citizen has no need to fear being ‘followed’ by LFR cameras. If data is stored, it is for a maximum of 0.6 seconds before being deleted. Privacy Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story. It is essential we spend more time and effort communicating exactly why watchlists are made, who they are made for and how they are being used, if we want to de-bunk myths and change the narrative. As science and technology professionals, heading up this exciting innovation, we must put transparency and accountability at the centre of what we do. Tony Porter, former Surveillance Camera Commissioner and current CPO at Corsight AI, has previously worked on developing processes that audit and review watch lists. Such restrictions are imperative in order for AI and LFR to be used legally, as well as ethically and responsibly. Biometrics, mask detection and contactless payments Nevertheless, the risks do not outweigh the benefits. Facial recognition should and can be used for good in so many more ways than listed above, including biometric, contactless payments, detecting whether an individual is wearing a facemask and is therefore, safe to enter a building, identifying a domestic abuse perpetrator returning to the scene of a crime and alerting police. There are even opportunities for good that we have not thought of yet. It is therefore not only a waste not to use this technology where we can, prioritising making society a safer place, it is immoral to stand by and let crimes continue while we have effective, reliable mitigation solutions.  

Securing empty premises: Product performance is everything
Securing empty premises: Product performance is everything

Since the start of the pandemic, almost a quarter of UK businesses have been forced to temporarily close, pause trading, or work remotely, with very little notice. Now nearing the 12th month of the crisis, the country is currently enduring its third national lockdown, with an unspecified timeframe. Most workers are being urged to remain at home and only venture out for essential travel. This means a huge number of premises across the board, from recreational venues such as theatres, pubs and leisure centres, to office buildings, and storage facilities, will remain empty. It’s likely that security has been scaled back, so many buildings could be vulnerable to attack for the foreseeable future. Just recently we’ve seen empty pubs in London targeted by opportunistic illegal rave organisers. Physical security strategy Even rural areas aren’t exempt from the problem, as burglars have reportedly targeted beauty salons, etc Even rural areas aren’t exempt from the problem, as burglars have reportedly targeted beauty salons, food stores and vehicle hire premises this winter. Vandalism and burglary remain very real threats, therefore it is vital that facilities managers and property owners ensure the physical security of these empty buildings is maintained to the highest standard to protect property and the assets within. Below we outline key considerations when evaluating a physical security strategy for an empty building. Assess the risk We would urge facilities managers and building owners to carry out regular, thorough checks of the building and the perimeter to assess any obvious factors which would elevate the risk of attack. This includes assessing the location. Is the crime rate high? How visible is the property? Are the contents of the property on show? How secure is the access or perimeter boundary? View the premises from a potential intruder’s perspective, and when you can’t be at the site in person, use photographs, notes and drawings to identify potential weaknesses. For example, there may be high security fencing at the front of the premises, but make sure it is not at risk of being compromised at the back. Conducting regular maintenance Retain and maintain quality Inspecting the fence line may seem obvious and straightforward, but it needs to be a deliberate, scheduled event Conducting regular maintenance is even more essential while premises are left empty, as it is much easier for any issues to appear and escalate undetected. We highly recommend regularly inspecting your fencing for disrepair or damage as this can affect the perimeter’s integrity. Alternatively, choosing high quality galvanised and preferably powder coated steel fencing with a 25-year guarantee will offer longer-lasting protection against rust and corrosion. Inspecting the fence line may seem obvious and straightforward, but it needs to be a deliberate, scheduled event. Take time to check the perimeter on both sides. As you inspect the fencing, keep an eye out for any attempted breaches and note if foliage, weather conditions, or topography changes have affected security integrity. Check all fixtures and fittings are in good working order, look for damage and corrosion, and clear all litter and debris away. Huge security risk Quality investments In a time when businesses are already stretched, it can be tempting to opt for quick, inexpensive fixes. However, poorly executed design or cheap, low quality products can lead to costly, long-term remediation or worse, significant loss to the business. Make wise, informed decisions and specify solutions based on your organisation’s security needs first and foremost. While generic steel palisade is a popular option, owing to its intimidating aesthetic, it is easily compromised. Steel palisade fencing has inherent weaknesses that undermine performance. Its wide pales can obstruct surveillance, while the bolted construction is a huge security risk. Simply removing or breaking the lower fixing on one or two pales would allow them to swing aside to give repeated access to the site without leaving an easily visible sign that the perimeter has been breached. It’s a false economy, as the initial lower price is offset by the costs and inconvenience incurred by regular repairs. Performance classification system The standard works via a performance classification system, and even considers the tools that an intruder may use Specifying a higher quality product that’s fit for purpose makes more sense both in the short and long term, and it adds little to the original cost. Fortunately, there are a number of security accreditations that facilities managers and building owners can refer to when specifying security measures at their site, helping them choose effective solutions to combat the risks the property faces. Proven performance Certifications and approvals, such as The Loss Prevention Certification Board’s (LPCB) LPS 1175 and the British Standards Institution’s (BSI) PAS, prove a product has been thoroughly tested to a specific standard. They prove the strength and durability of the item in multiple different situations. It is worth noting also that investing in effective perimeter protection can actually deliver a positive return by reducing the incidence of burglary and vandalism, and their associated costs. The technical evaluation work carried out by LPCB is extremely thorough. The product is subjected to rigorous quality audit processes, to certify the security products tested by BRE deliver verified levels of protection. All LPS 1175 rated products are vigorously tested before receiving an accreditation. The standard works via a performance classification system, and even considers the tools that an intruder may use. Intrusion detection system Our law enforcement teams are stretched to capacity and coping with reduced workforces due to illness By predicting a likely toolset, specifiers can construct multiple defensive layers to maximise how much time a facility has to respond to an attack. Different levels of security are crucial for the ‘5D defence’ concept, whereby a quintet of security assets work together to prevent access to your site, resulting in a strategy that will: Deter, Detect, Deny, Delay and Defend unwanted access from intruders. 360° security There is no single solution when it comes to securing a building. Every situation must be considered on an individual basis, starting with a full risk assessment. We recommend an integrated approach where appropriate. Along with a secure perimeter, this might also include effective lighting in shaded areas and at doors, gates, and vulnerable windows, Perimeter Intrusion Detection Systems (PIDS) and well-placed CCTV. These measures can hinder entry and escape, or increase the chance of discovery and detection. Domestic burglaries While domestic burglaries have become less attractive as many of our homes are now occupied around the clock, commercial properties have become increasingly more vulnerable. Our law enforcement teams are stretched to capacity and coping with reduced workforces due to isolating and illness. Therefore it has never been so important for building owners and facilities managers to assess the properties they’re responsible for to ensure they’re protected effectively in the event of an attack.

Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre
Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre

Urban populations are expanding rapidly around the globe, with an expected growth of 1.56 billion by 2040. As the number of people living and working in cities continues to grow, the ability to keep everyone safe is an increasing challenge. However, technology companies are developing products and solutions with these futuristic cities in mind, as the reality is closer than you may think. Solutions that can help to watch over public places and share data insights with city workers and officials are increasingly enabling smart cities to improve the experience and safety of the people who reside there. Rising scope of 5G, AI, IoT and the Cloud The main foundations that underpin smart cities are 5G, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Cloud. Each is equally important, and together, these technologies enable city officials to gather and analyse more detailed insights than ever before. For public safety in particular, having IoT and cloud systems in place will be one of the biggest factors to improving the quality of life for citizens. Smart cities have come a long way in the last few decades, but to truly make a smart city safe, real-time situational awareness and cross-agency collaboration are key areas which must be developed as a priority. Innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns. From dangerous drivers to terrorist attacks, petty crime on the streets to high profile bank robberies, innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT and cloud technologies can go some way to helping respond quickly to, and in some cases even prevent, the most serious incidents. Many existing safety systems in cities rely on aging and in some places legacy technology, such as video surveillance cameras. Many of these also use on-premises systems rather than utilising the benefits of the cloud. Smart programming to deliver greater insights These issues, though not creating a major problem today, do make it more challenging for governments and councils to update their security. Changing every camera in a city is a huge undertaking, but in turn, doing so would enable all cameras to be connected to the cloud, and provide more detailed information which can be analysed by smart programming to deliver greater insights. The physical technologies that are currently present in most urban areas lack the intelligent connectivity, interoperability and integration interfaces that smart cities need. Adopting digital technologies isn’t a luxury, but a necessity. Smart surveillance systems It enables teams to gather data from multiple sources throughout the city in real-time, and be alerted to incidents as soon as they occur. Increased connectivity and collaboration ensures that all teams that need to be aware of a situation are informed instantly. For example, a smart surveillance system can identify when a road accident has occurred. It can not only alert the nearest ambulance to attend the scene, but also the local police force to dispatch officers. An advanced system that can implement road diversions could also close roads around the incident immediately and divert traffic to other routes, keeping everyone moving and avoiding a build-up of vehicles. This is just one example: without digital systems, analysing patterns of vehicle movements to address congestion issues could be compromised, as would the ability to build real-time crime maps and deploy data analytics which make predictive policing and more effective crowd management possible. Cloud-based technologies Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation that is needed to overcome the limitations of traditional security systems. Using these, smart cities can develop a fully open systems architecture that delivers interoperation with both local and other remote open systems. The intelligence of cloud systems can not only continue to allow for greater insights as technology develops over time, but it can do so with minimal additional infrastructure investment. Smart surveillance in the real world Mexico City has a population of almost 9 million people, but if you include the whole metropolitan area, this number rises sharply to over 21 million in total, making it one of the largest cities on the planet. Seven years ago, the city first introduced its Safe City initiative, and ever since has been developing newer and smarter ways to keep its citizens safe. In particular, its cloud-based security initiative is making a huge impact. Over the past three years, Mexico City has installed 58,000 new video surveillance cameras throughout the city, in public spaces and on transport, all of which are connected to the City’s C5 (Command, Control, Computers, Communications and Citizen Contact) facility. Smart Cities operations The solution enables officers as well as the general public to upload videos via a mobile app to share information quickly, fixed, body-worn and vehicle cameras can also be integrated to provide exceptional insight into the city’s operations. The cloud-based platform can easily be upgraded to include the latest technology innovations such as licence plate reading, behavioural analysis software, video analytics and facial recognition software, which will all continue to bring down crime rates and boost response times to incidents. The right cloud approach Making the shift to cloud-based systems enables smart cities to eliminate dependence on fibre-optic connectivity and take advantage of a variety of Internet and wireless connectivity options that can significantly reduce application and communication infrastructure costs. Smart cities need to be effective in years to come, not just in the present day, or else officials have missed one of the key aspects of a truly smart city. System designers must build technology foundations now that can be easily adapted in the future to support new infrastructure as it becomes available. Open system architecture An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations For example, this could include opting for a true cloud application that can support cloud-managed local devices and automate their management. An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations and deliver additional value-add services to citizens as greater capabilities become possible in the years to come. The advances today in cloud and IoT technologies are rapid, and city officials and authorities have more options now to develop their smart cities than ever before and crucially, to use these innovations to improve public safety. New safety features Though implementing these cloud-based systems now requires investment, as new safety features are designed, there will be lower costs and challenges associated with introducing these because the basic infrastructure will already exist. Whether that’s gunshot detection or enabling the sharing of video infrastructure and data across multiple agencies in real time, smart video surveillance on cloud-based systems can bring a wealth of the new opportunities.

Latest ASSA ABLOY EMEA news

ASSA ABLOY releases a white paper discussing why specifiers should care about inclusive design for doors
ASSA ABLOY releases a white paper discussing why specifiers should care about inclusive design for doors

When talking about inclusive design, many people immediately think of those with a disability or specific, specialist requirements. While inclusive design encompasses the needs of these people, its key objective is to make a site inclusive for all, no matter what. In fact, despite public perception and the wheelchair being the symbol for accessibility, less than 8 per cent of disabilities require the use of a wheelchair. Whether it’s the elderly, disabled or children, everyone should be able to access and use a building and its facilities easily and safely. Inclusive design is a key consideration for most architects and specifiers, ensuring any barriers that might prevent an individual from using an environment freely and easily are removed. Governing inclusive design This approach must be reviewed in line with the guidelines governing inclusive design, which includes Approved Document M, the Equality Act 2010 and, crucially, BS 8300-1 and 8300-2:2018, which sets out how buildings should be designed, constructed and maintained to create an accessible and inclusive environment for all. It applies to both new builds and refurbishments. The white paper explains the factors that specifiers need to take into account for door opening solutions The white paper explains the factors that specifiers need to take into account for door opening solutions to be inclusive. It also covers some of the common issues with many door opening solutions available on the market, which might claim to comply with standards such as BS 8300-1 and 8300-2:2018 but do not. For instance, many suppliers will claim to offer compliant solutions by ‘winding down’ a door closer and its spring to power setting EN1. Fire safety standards However, while this may help people open a door more easily, it will not provide the necessary closing force. As a result, the door will not deliver the safety and security assurances demanded of an inclusive environment. It is also important to note that fire doors must have a minimum power setting of EN3 at all times, to meet these needs. In addition to covering what the guidelines governing inclusive design state for door opening solutions, the white paper advises on how specifiers can ensure these meet the necessary fire safety standards too. While fire safety has always been critical, incidents such as the Grenfell tragedy have highlighted how this issue can never afford to be an afterthought. Door opening solutions Our new white paper aims to offer specifiers a helpful and informative overview of why inclusive design is so important" “Inclusive design is viewed by most specifiers nowadays as a non-negotiable,” explains Eryl Jones, Managing Director of the ASSA ABLOY Door Hardware Group. “While it is the owner that ultimately bears responsibility for the design of a building, should a legal dispute arise then a specifier would be called upon to explain why a solution was recommended. In the event of a discrimination claim, those that can demonstrate that they have adhered to standards such as BS 8300-1 and 8300-2:2018 will be on safer ground than those that cannot.” “Our new white paper aims to offer specifiers a helpful and informative overview of why inclusive design is so important, what the guidelines governing this state, and the considerations that they need to think about when specifying a door opening solution. This means they can be confident when recommending door opening solutions for projects, ensuring everyone – from the elderly to those with a disability and children – can access and use a building and its facilities safely.” Greater consumer loyalty “Furthermore, with some specifiers potentially facing clients that might want to do the bare legal minimum when it comes to inclusive design, the white paper also helps outline why the approach is not only the right thing to do from a social point of view, but the impact it can have commercially too.” “Market drivers such as an ageing population and consumer buying power mean brands that prioritise inclusive building design can enjoy greater consumer loyalty and spending opportunities, as well as increased differentiation, credibility and brand awareness. We hope that the findings included in the white paper can help support this case for specifiers, when having these conversations with clients.” Correct specification of hardware It’s really good to see such an important message being highlighted in this white paper" Douglas Masterson, Technical Manager at the Guild of Architectural Ironmongers (GAI), adds: “It is refreshing in the current climate to see accessibility being placed firmly on the agenda through this white paper. At the moment, the headlines are rightly dominated by fire safety – following the Grenfell tragedy – and on-going issues related to the Covid-19 pandemic. While these are of huge importance, accessibility must always have room in any discussion relating to the construction industry.” “This paper states: ‘All those involved in the design and construction of a building should not simply be working towards inclusivity but demanding it every single time.’ The GAI is firmly in favour of this statement, and the correct specification of hardware in a building must have the issues of accessibility and inclusive design at its heart.” Outlining the relevant standards Bob Perry, CEO of the Door Hardware Federation (DHF), comments: “It’s really good to see such an important message being highlighted in this white paper. Our society is changing – both in its demographics and its attitudes – and it is clear that any company that fails on inclusivity will be left behind. At the same time, however, the requirements around inclusive design are somewhat opaque and there is still much confusion in the industry.” “What this white paper from ASSA ABLOY does is present everything the industry needs to know about the issue. It outlines the relevant standards, explains what they really mean, and tells them exactly what they need to do to make sure their door hardware is compliant. On behalf of DHF, I recommend that it is essential reading.”

What are the physical security challenges of smart cities?
What are the physical security challenges of smart cities?

The emergence of smart cities provides real-world evidence of the vast capabilities of the Internet of Things (IoT). Urban areas today can deploy a variety of IoT sensors to collect data that is then analysed to provide insights to drive better decision-making and ultimately to make modern cities more livable. Safety and security are an important aspect of smart cities, and the capabilities that drive smarter cities also enable technologies that make them safer. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: what are the physical security challenges of smart cities?

What are the challenges of retrofits, and how can they be overcome?
What are the challenges of retrofits, and how can they be overcome?

Retrofit projects provide new levels of physical security modernisation to existing facilities. However, retrofits come with their own set of challenges that can frustrate system designers and defy the efforts of equipment manufacturers. We asked this week’s Expert Panel Roundtable: What are the biggest challenges of retrofit projects, and how can they be overcome?

Related white papers

Physical access control in higher education

11 considerations for embedded system RFID readers

Beyond security: access control for multi-tenant sites