Access Professional Edition 2.1
Access Professional Edition 2.1

Bosch Security Systems further enhances its widely-used access control solution for small and medium-sized companies with the Access Professional Edition (APE) 2.1 which will be released soon. Thanks to new interfaces, an even larger number of devices and operating systems are now compatible.Since its initial launch, the easy-to-use, scalable access control software APE meets an extensive range of security requirements and assures an easy integration of access control with a variety of security functions, such as CCTV, intrusion detection or elevator management. In its updated version, APE features an optimised support of the most common operating systems, such as Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 and Windows XP. Furthermore it enables a seamless interconnectivity with Bosch HD cameras and the midrange recorders Divar 400 and Divar 600.With APE, Bosch offers a multifunctional, extremely reliable yet flexible solution for a variety of small to midsized establishments such as office buildings, laboratories, schools or the likes. The system is capable of handling up to 10.000 cardholders. In total 128 readers and 128 cameras can be managed. The access modes ‘card', ‘pin' or ‘card and pin' provide individual levels of security."APE is very popular with our clients, as it caters to all common security requirements and offers a number of additional, handy features", says Patrick Looijmans at Bosch Security Systems. By displaying the database photo and a live image recorded at the door, as well as basic cardholder data with the time stamp of access request for example, the software helps the operator to instantly verify that card and cardholder are matching. Also a fast tracking of persons in the building is possible, which is particularly helpful in case of an emergency. Using the integrated card configuration function furthermore increases the security as badges can be designed according to corporate guidelines and persons can be identified throughout the entire premises. "All in all APE is a modern, straightforward all-round solution, which just got even better in its latest version 2.1", says Patrick Looijmans.

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The new age of access control from Bosch
The new age of access control from Bosch

Access control has become a vital component of any security concept worldwide. The protection of intellectual property rights, prevention of theft and sabotage or simply compliance requirements - there are a multitude of reasons why companies of all kinds need to use a comprehensive access control system to restrict, manage and control access to their facilities. However, operated in isolation from other safety and security systems, even the most sophisticated access control system cannot really live up to its promises. In such an environment, operation and monitoring can quickly turn into a nightmare, as each system has its own architecture, its own user interface and its own management tool. This is why more and more organizations are looking out for an access control solution that easily integrates with video monitoring, intrusion detection and sometimes even visitor management to form a homogeneous security system with a consistent user interface and central management and operations.Moreover, suppliers are more and more often faced with requirements of their customers to supply a documentation of all access attempts, whether successful or not, to protect against industrial espionage. To fulfill this requirement, not only employee access must be captured and recorded, but also the entire visitor traffic. Video integration for more safetyWhile modern access control systems allow an efficient management of access rights, they are rather powerless against abuse if operated on their own. In critical environments it is mandatory to add a second layer of security by integrating access control with some kind of video surveillance. To prevent abuse, all access requests can then trigger one or more video cameras. Integrated systems can provide alarm verification, instantly displaying live video images from nearby cameras when there is an alarm event at a door - such as when a person presents an unauthorised credential or when a door is forced open. Forensics can also benefit from such integration if the video recordings are referenced in the access control system's event log. Such a feature greatly facilitates identification, retrieval and playback of past events and alarms if necessary.Open standards ease integrationIntegrating access control, video monitoring, and intrusion detection can be rather easy when all components come from the same vendor and if this vendor also offers a management platform like the Building Integration System from Bosch for all of them. Integrated systems "off the shelf" can greatly ease installation and configuration of the security solution. Logical integration eliminates the need for multiple software platform and interfaces -- resulting in fewer complications and greater event-driven functionality as well as reduced installation time and costs. What's more, this kind of integration also promises more efficient operation and a clearly reduced need for training, but above all also a higher security level. An open standards-based management system even makes sense in those cases where one vendor supplies everything, as it opens up the entire installation for future expansion.User interface is keyAn integrated security system is a very complex apparatus, and if this complexity is not hidden from the user, the system will be highly prone to human error and maloperation. Such systems do need very clear and intuitive user interfaces, avoiding information overload while offering all the information that is currently needed. This is even more important when several components or dialogs are open, which will often be the case if you deal with access control, video surveillance and maybe intrusion detection from the same console.

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Bosch benefits from increasing awareness for its access control solutions
Bosch benefits from increasing awareness for its access control solutions

Following the Security 2010 exhibition in Essen, Germany, it is evident that Bosch is receiving increased awareness for its investment in the access control and integrated systems markets. While the Bosch booth has traditionally been popular for its video, communications, intrusion detection, and fire prevention solutions, this year Bosch saw an exponential increase of interest in the access control and integrated systems offerings, making it yet one of the areas of highest growth potential.In Essen, Bosch showcased its complete portfolio of access control and integrated systems solutions. Customers were able to see and experience solutions for small, mid-sized and large environments: the Access Easy Control System supporting up to 32 readers, the reliable 128-reader Access Professional Edition system, and the Building Integration System (BIS) software. The BIS software system is used to connect all security, safety, and building automation components and to integrate them into one central and comprehensive management system.Further to the enhancement of the portfolio itself, Bosch is increasing its market presence with additional service offerings and more trained marketing and salespeople to answer the growing demand. According to Alex Squarize, Bosch Security Systems, "Bosch is absolutely in a good position for future growth. The investment in research and development over the past years has already started to pay off. We are adding to our portfolio day after day, while we continue to invest into training and development of our employees. No other company in the market is currently investing as much into access control and integrated systems solutions.""The future outlook remains positive", Squarize continues. "We are currently seeing more and more implementations of these Bosch solutions, and we are experiencing substantial growth in both geographical reach and quantity. We look forward to 2011 with optimism!"Download PDF of Bosch Access Easy Control system

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Extended set of benefits: new version of Building Integration System from Bosch to be launched
Extended set of benefits: new version of Building Integration System from Bosch to be launched

Including interface advancements, enlarged vendor independency and compatibility with the latest Windows Internet Explorer 9, Bosch Security Systems introduces a number of updates to its Building Integration System (BIS). The new version 2.5, which is available from early May 2012, increases the range of supported devices to more than 1,000 different third party cameras and encoders, making it suitable for even the most complex integration projects. The new system allows further optimized security, safety and communication management in one front-end system with customized user interface. The range of video devices supported by BIS 2.5 is unmatched in the industry. It seamlessly interoperates with virtually any video camera, connecting to the latest IP cameras on the market with HD and H.264 encoding technology. The Divar 700 and Bosch Recording Station are supported in their most recent versions. BIS 2.5 benefits installers and end users alike: certified BIS partners and systems integrators enjoy an upgraded level of customization options, such as new layout formats for a wide range of monitor sizes (including 16:9 and 16:10). Thanks to numerous handy improvements, such as useful additions to the symbol libraries, it is now even easier to personalize the system. BIS 2.5 is interoperable with the large variety of ONVIF-compatible, modern IP-based video products supplied by all major manufacturers. ONVIF ensures a uniform standard, allowing customers to choose the product that best fits their individual needs, without having to worry about compatibility. It thereby saves costs and allows long term planning. The ONVIF standard was first introduced by a consortium of companies, including founding member Bosch, in 2008.

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Access control software - Expert commentary

Wireless technology is transforming motion detection
Wireless technology is transforming motion detection

Motion detection is a key feature of security systems in residential and commercial environments. Until recently, systems have relied heavily on closed circuit television (CCTV) and passive infrared (PIR) sensors, which both require significant investment and infrastructure to install and monitor. Developments in wireless technology are increasing home security possibilities. Few years ago, these developments led Cognitive Systems to discover that the wireless signals surrounding oneself can be used to detect motion. Known in the wireless industry as WiFi sensing, this technology brings many benefits that other motion detection solutions have not been able to provide. The working of WiFi sensing At Cognitive Systems, the company has used WiFi sensing technology to develop a motion detection solution called WiFi Motion™, which measures and interprets disruptions in RF signals transmitted between WiFi devices. When movement occurs in a space, ripples in the wireless signals are created. WiFi Motion interprets these ripples and determines if an action, such as sending a notification, is needed. Enabling this functionality in a space is incredibly simple. With a software upgrade to only one’s WiFi access point (or mesh router), motion sensing capabilities are layered into one’s WiFi network. Existing connected WiFi devices then become motion detectors without detracting from their original functions or slowing down the network. Using artificial intelligence (AI), WiFi Motion establishes a benchmark of the motionless environment and learns movement patterns over time, which could be used to predict trends. This allows unusual movement patterns to be detected with greater accuracy while decreasing the potential for costly false alerts. WiFi Motion requires no line-of-sight or installation WiFi sensing and other home monitoring solutions All of these capabilities are made possible by WiFi sensing and together create a motion detection system that provides unparalleled accuracy, coverage, privacy and affordability compared to other solutions on the market. PIR integration is far more complex and imposes electronic and physical design restrictions compared to WiFi sensing. In terms of placement, PIR systems are difficult to install, requiring line-of-sight and a device in every room for localisation. WiFi Motion requires no line-of-sight or installation and is also a scalable solution compared to PIR. Much like cameras, PIRs can only cover so much space, but WiFi Motion can cover the entire home and even detect motion in the dark and through walls, without adding additional devices to the home. WiFi Motion detects less distinguishing context than cameras and microphones, but more context than regular PIR sensors for the perfect balance of privacy and highly accurate motion detection. Privacy solution While cameras have been the security solution for years, WiFi Motion offers a more affordable solution that can rival the privacy and coverage capabilities of even the most high-end cameras. With such a wide coverage area, one might think that WiFi sensing infringes on privacy, but actually, the opposite is true. With WiFi Motion, the contextual information collected cannot be used to identify a specific individual, unlike cameras which can clearly identify a person’s face or microphones, which can identify a person’s voice. It is different from other smart home security options that use cameras and microphones because it only senses motion using WiFi signals - it doesn’t “see” or “listen” like a camera or microphone would. This provides opportunities for added security in spaces where privacy might be a concern and installing a camera may not be a comfortable solution, such as bathrooms and bedrooms. The data collected is also anonymised and highly encrypted according to stringent industry privacy standards. Existing connected WiFi devices then become motion detectors Additional WiFi sensing applications Since WiFi sensing technology requires no additional hardware or subscription fees, it is much more affordable than other motion detection solutions. It can be used as a standalone solution, or it can be easily layered into more complex systems. This ease of integration, scalability and relatively low cost brings a lot of potential for various applications. Motion detection can trigger other smart devices in the network to turn lights on or off In eldercare, for example, WiFi sensing can be used to help seniors live comfortably in their homes for as long as possible. With the increasing aging population and high costs associated with care homes, the market for this application is considerable. Caregivers can use an app to monitor movement in their loved one’s home and be alerted about unusual movement patterns that could indicate a concern. For smart homes and other environments that have a network of smart devices, the artificial intelligence (AI) component of the technology allows for improvements to automated features. Motion detection can trigger other smart devices in the network to turn lights on or off or make adjustments to the temperature in a room. Security for the commercial sector For office buildings and other commercial properties, it is easy to see how all of these features could be scaled up to offer a highly accurate and cost-effective motion sensing and smart device automation solution. Cognitive Systems is closely involved with the development of WiFi sensing technology, working with various industry groups to establish standards and help it reach its full potential. WiFi Motion is merely the tip of the iceberg in terms of motion sensing possibilities, but its applications in the world of security are undeniably compelling. It is an exciting time for the wireless industry, as one works with stakeholders in the security space to explore everything this technology can do.

4 ways to keep your workplace protected from COVID-19
4 ways to keep your workplace protected from COVID-19

The unprecedented global impact of COVID-19 has taken its toll on all of us, but as cases of the virus thankfully recede, employers are now forced to confront how they can enable a safe return to work for employees. For many employers, this means they will have to carry out a COVID-19 risk assessment, redesign workspaces to maintain social distances, carry out more frequent cleaning, manage the transmission risk and find alternatives to touch-based security devices. Protecting workplace occupants in any emergency requires preparation and clear communication. This is especially critical in a health crisis involving an infectious disease. These are some of the essential best practices that could help organisations reduce the impact on their employees and operations during this pandemic. 1. Use a visitor management system With a visitor management system, organisations have a single source of real-time and historical insights into who is, or was recently, in the workplace. This is especially important because of the need to perform contact tracing should anyone in the organisation show symptoms of COVID-19, meaning everyone they have been in contact with needs to be contacted and asked to isolate. Yet still, first impressions are made at the front desk or lobby, where the visitor experience needs to be a positive one. At the same time, though, any emergency event requires that there be strict control over who is entering the workplace. This policy also needs to be clearly communicated to visitors. Doing this minimises risk to visitors as well as the workforce. In addition to delivering a high-quality visitor experience, the ideal visitor management system must: Enable organisations to meet regulatory compliance mandates and facilitate check-in at a self-service kiosk to minimise wait times. Customise the visitor experience to support specific security needs, such as accelerating and simplifying check-in or requiring additional security pre-checks. Automate compliance as it relates to visitor access rules with historical visit reports. 2. Pre-check questions at visitor registration kiosks Organisations can strengthen security at the registration kiosk using a flexible, enterprise-grade visitor management system to add visitor sign-in steps. This has proven successful in the past when used to control the spread of infectious disease during an outbreak. An example of this is a U.S. children's hospital which managed to reduce facility infection rates by 25 percent over a two-year period using a commercial, off-the-shelf physical identity and access management (PIAM) solution from HID Global. The solution provides two particularly important capabilities that can be used by organisations to protect their workplace from the uncontrolled spread of an infectious disease: Enhance visitor registration policy with additional mandatory questions to help identify any visitors who may need other screenings. Extend the visitor registration kiosk with a mandatory pop-up asking further questions during visitor check-in. 3. Understand who has visited your workplace Successful controlling the spread of infection throughout a facility requires the ability to automatically maintain an auditable trail of activity. This can be done using an enterprise-grade visitor management system that makes it easy to retrieve historical visit reports. This provides a timeline of who was in the workplace, and when they were there. Key features include: A single dashboard providing useful visitor insights at your fingertips. Historical reports that provide visitor details including location and contact information, all in compliance with General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and other privacy regulations. 4. Clearly communicate how infection risks can be reduced Global organisations must actively communicate with visitors and employees on the outbreak of infectious diseases and follow best practices outlined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Here are several things organisations can do in this area to help maintain a safe and healthy workplace: Re-enforce and communicate WHO best practices with guideline posters in the front lobby and throughout the workplace. Add posters that also encourage regular and thorough washing of hands. Encourage everyone to cough or sneese into their shirt sleeve in their flexed elbow or cover their mouth and nose with a tissue. Encourage everyone to keep a relatively safe distance from each other and use alternatives to handshakes when saying hello. Organisations must contend with a variety of workplace challenges during the outbreak of an infectious disease. These challenges can be solved with best practices that include a comprehensive visitor management system that automates critical check-in policies and maintains an auditable trail of visitor activity.  

The role of building systems to ensure safety as employees return to work
The role of building systems to ensure safety as employees return to work

Returning to work after the global pandemic will not be business as usual, and security systems are an important asset when it comes to helping to keep occupants and buildings safe. For example, video analytics can provide insight into how spaces have previously been used and can help to predict where and when occupants encounter each other or congregate. These foot-traffic patterns can inform settings for a variety of devices – like ventilation and temperature controls – and even help owners create social distancing plans and monitor personal protective equipment (PPE) compliance. “While the ‘new normal’ is still being defined, we believe there will be a greater focus on creating healthier environments while also complying with new regulations,” says Marcus Logan, Global Offering Leader, Honeywell Commercial Security. “Temperature, humidity, energy efficiency, security, safety, comfort, productivity, and demonstrating compliance with regulations are all a part of a healthy building.” For example, social distancing is a new concept for the workplace. How do you make that happen in an open work setting, in breakrooms, elevator lobbies and meeting spaces? Optimised systems create healthier environments Anxious employees will need reassurance about returning to the workplace Building owners will need to look at how they can optimise their systems – or deploy new ones – to create a healthier environment. Building technologies, like those provided by Honeywell's Healthy Buildings solutions, provide building owners with more control over critical factors to encourage sustained compliance with changing building standards, safety guidelines, government-issued regulations, and a company's risk management policies. These solutions also provide transparency for occupants into a building's status, says Logan. Hygiene will be a critical issue: People will want to know that the spaces are ready for their return. Increased cleaning procedures and schedules will evolve, and a way will be needed to demonstrate the procedures are effective and that they have been strictly adhered to. Identifying ways to measure effectiveness of sanitisation and track compliance to the procedures will be a key challenge to solve. This is a space that will evolve significantly in the coming months and years, says Logan. Access control and video analytics Contact tracing is a new requirement in some businesses, and security technology – like access control and video analytics with advanced reporting – can help. Access control technology integrated with video analytics can be used to trace occupant movements within a facility. These technologies capture data that can be used with advanced reporting to provide a digital footprint of where a person has been within a facility and if they may have been exposed to someone identified as being infected with a contagious virus. Building owners can then proactively notify exposed individuals evolve to self-quarantine and minimise further spread of an infection. Video analytics can help to predict where and when occupants encounter each other Anxious employees will need reassurance about returning to the workplace. They will not only seek confidence that the building is optimised for a healthier environment but also that processes are in place to quickly identify and respond to potential issues. Transparency and visibility into how the building works and the health of the environment will help to reassure occupants returning to the workplace. “One way to do this is to share building analytics with occupants – to help them understand factors about the indoor air quality or occupancy density,” says Logan. Controlled health, safety and security Honeywell’s solutions provide building owners with more control over critical health, safety and security factors to encourage sustained compliance with changing building standards, safety guidelines, government-issued regulations and a company’s risk management policies, Logan adds. Visibility into how the building works and the health of the environment will help to reassure occupants returning to the workplace Every day there is new information coming from the medical and scientific community about COVID-19, and the building industry is just starting to learn what it all means. Logan warns that there is no single solution that will keep every environment healthy and safe. A good strategy features deploying a combination of solutions, optimising systems and being vigilant to make sure that companies are sustaining compliance to new and changing regulations, says Logan. “Today more than ever we must be mindful of the changing culture of how buildings are managed by making apparent the need to be mindful of health and well-being in all aspects of our lives,” says Logan. Honeywell has developed outcome-based solutions that allow building owners to transparently address building quality factors while supporting their business continuity needs in the uncertain environment. “We’re giving them the data they need to confidently reassure their employees to accelerate their business operations,” he adds.

Latest Bosch Security Systems news

Functionality beyond security: The advent of open platform cameras
Functionality beyond security: The advent of open platform cameras

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic marks the biggest global disruption since World War II. While the ‘new normal’ after the crisis is still taking shape, consumers are apprehensive about the future. According to a recent survey, 60% of shoppers are afraid of going grocery shopping, with 73% making fewer trips to physical stores. Returning to the workplace is also causing unease, as 66% of employees report feeling uncomfortable about returning to work after COVID-19.  Businesses and employers are doing their best to alleviate these fears and create safe environments in and around their buildings. This also comes at tremendous costs for new safety measures and technologies – including updates to sanitation protocols and interior architecture – that protect against COVID-19. Costs in the billions that most businesses will face alone, without support from insurance and amidst larger macroeconomic challenges. Saving costs and increasing security But what if building operators, retail shop owners, and other stakeholders could save costs by leveraging new functionality from their existing security infrastructure? More specifically, expanding the use of current-generation security cameras – equipped with AI-driven image analysis capabilities – beyond the realm of security and into meeting new health regulations. This is exactly where video analytics algorithms come into play. And in the next step, a new evolutionary approach towards open security camera platforms promises new opportunities. Security cameras have evolved from mere image capturing devices into complex data sensors Over the past decade, security cameras have evolved from mere image capturing devices into complex data sensors. They provide valuable data that can be analysed and used in beneficial ways that are becoming the norm. Since 2016, Bosch has offered built-in Video Analytics as standard on all its IP cameras. On one hand, this enables automated detection of security threats more reliably than human operators. And on the other hand, video analytics collect rich metadata to help businesses improve safety, increase efficiency, reduce costs, and create new value beyond security. Expanding camera functionality beyond security Today, we have ‘smart’ security cameras with built-in video analytics to automatically warn operators of intruders, suspicious objects and dangerous behaviors. The rich metadata from several cameras on the same network can also be consolidated by making use of an intelligent software solution. It offers so-called pre-defined widgets to provide business intelligence by measuring area fill levels, counting building occupancy and detecting the formation of crowds. In combination with live video stream data, these insights enable heightened situational awareness to security operators. What’s more, operators are free to set their own parameters – like maximum number of occupants in a space and ‘off limit’ areas – to suit their needs. These user-centric widgets also come in handy in dealing with the coronavirus pandemic. Specific widgets can trigger an alarm, public announcement or trigger a 'traffic light' when the maximum number of people in a space is exceeded. Building operators can also use available intelligence such as foot traffic ‘heat maps’ to identify problem areas that tend to become congested and place hand sanitiser stations at heavily frequented hotspots. At the same time, the option to perform remote maintenance on these systems limits the exposure of technicians in the field during the pandemic. Again, the underlying camera hardware and software already exist. Cameras will be able to ‘learn’ future functionality to curb the spread of the coronavirus Looking ahead, cameras with video analytic and neural network-based analytic capabilities will be able to ‘learn’ future functionality to curb the spread of the coronavirus. For instance, cameras could monitor distances between individuals and trigger voice announcements when social distancing guidelines are violated. Facial recognition software can be trained to monitor personal protective equipment (PPE) compliance and sound alerts for persons entering buildings without masks. The technical requirements are already in place. The task at hand is to deliver these new functionalities to cameras at scale, which is where open camera platforms hold the key. Why open camera operating systems? When it comes to innovating future camera applications that extend beyond security, no hardware manufacturer should go at it alone. Instead, an open platform approach provides the environment for third-party developers to innovate and market new functions. In essence, an open platform principle allows customers and users to change the behavior of devices by adding software afterwards. This software can either be found in an app store or can be self-developed. For a precedent, we can look at the mobile phone industry. This is where software ecosystems like Android and Apple’s iOS have become the norm. They have also become major marketplaces, with the Apple App Store generating $519 billion in billings on 2019, as users use their phones for far more than just making phone calls. In the same way, intelligent cameras will be used far beyond classic video applications in the future. To get there, adopting an open platform principle is essential for a genuine transformation on an industry level. But establishing an open platform principle in the fragmented video security industry demands a cooperative approach. In 2018 Bosch started a fully owned start-up company, Security & Safety Things, and became one of five founding members of OSSA (Open Security & Safety Alliance). With more than 40 members, the Alliance has collectively created the first Technology Stack for “open” video security devices. This includes the OSSA Application Interface Specification and Compliant Device Definition Specification. An open camera platform for innovating future functionality  Based on OSSA’s common APIs, collective approach on data security and core system requirements for video security cameras, the first camera manufacturers were able to build video security cameras that adopt an open platform principle. Further fueling innovation, OSSA focused on driving the creation of one centralised marketplace to unite demand and supply in the market. Camera devices that are built in accordance with OSSA’s Technology Stack, so-called “Driven by OSSA” devices, can benefit from this marketplace which consists of three pillars: a development environment, an application store, and a device management portal. Security & Safety Things has advanced OSSA’s open camera platform concept, built this marketplace for the security and safety industry and has developed the open OS that powers the first “Driven by OSSA” devices. Making it quick and simple to customise security solutions by installing and executing multiple apps This year, Bosch, as one of the first camera manufacturers, introduces the new INTEOX generation of open platform cameras. To innovate a future beyond security functionality, INTEOX combines built-in Intelligent Video Analytics from Bosch, an open Operating System (OS), and the ability to securely add software apps as needed. Thanks to the fully open principle, system integrators are free to add apps available in the application store, making it quick and simple to customise security solutions by installing and executing multiple apps on the INTEOX platform. In turn, app developers can now focus on leveraging the intelligence and valuable data collected by analytics-equipped cameras for their own software developments to introduce new exciting possibilities of applying cameras. These possibilities are needed as smart buildings and IoT-connected technology platforms continue to evolve. And they will provide new answers to dealing with COVID-19. The aforementioned detection of face masks and PPE via facial detection algorithms is just one of manifold scenarios in which new apps could provide valuable functionality. Contact tracing is another field where a combination of access control and video analytics with rich metadata can make all the difference. Overall, open camera platforms open a future where new, complex functionality that can save lives, ensure business continuity and open new business opportunities will arrive via something as simple as a software update. And this is just the beginning.

Bosch introduces Access Management System 3.0 that integrates with other security solutions
Bosch introduces Access Management System 3.0 that integrates with other security solutions

Today’s market wants access control systems that are always available, scalable, and integrated with other security solutions like video and intrusion systems to ensure the highest security and safety levels. At the same time, these systems must be easy to configure and use. With the introduction of the Access Management System 3.0, Bosch meets all of these requirements. Always available for security Access Management System 3.0 is designed to be available at all times. Its resilient design includes a Master Access Controller (MAC) as an additional layer of defence between the server and the access controllers. If the server fails, the MAC takes over, ensuring continuous communication across controllers while sharing necessary information from the card readers. In addition, access control functionalities that involve multiple access readers, such as anti-passback and guard tour can continue to perform. The anti-passback functionality is an important feature to ensure a high level of security. It prevents a cardholder from passing a card to another person enabling an unauthorised entry. Guard tour is a safety functionality offered to security guards, which uses access readers as checkpoints along a defined route at specified times. Threat level management The different threat levels can make all doors open, or all doors blocked, or a mix of open and blocked Any deviation of sequence or timing causes an alarm in the Access Management System. Immediate notifications to colleagues or first responders increase the safety of security guards. In the rare event that both the Access Management System 3.0 server and the MAC fail, cardholders can still enter and leave areas with their badges because the database is stored directly on the Access Management Controllers (AMCs). Thanks to this offline capability, it is possible to save millions of events even during downtimes, ensuring the continuous availability of the system. Access Management System 3.0 offers up to 15 configurable threat levels such as lockdown, controlled lockdown, or evacuation, which means safety measures can be initiated quickly in critical situations such as fire or security breach. The threat level state is activated by one of three triggers: operator workstation, external contact such as an emergency button, or specially configured “emergency” cards that are presented to a reader. The different threat levels can make all doors open, or all doors blocked, or a mix of open and blocked. Scalable and future-proof Users can start small and add extra capacity whenever necessary. The Access Management System 3.0 software can be expanded up to 10,000 doors and 200,000 cardholders. The software is offered in three pre-configured software bundles from medium to large organisations: Lite (max. 144 doors), Plus (max. 512 doors), and Professional (max. 10,000 doors). All bundles support up to 200,000 cardholders. No hardware needs replacing when expanding; users only require software upgrades and possibly additional controllers, readers, and cards. So, increasing the system is also cost-efficient. Customers who work with the software solution Access Professional Edition (APE) from Bosch can migrate to the Access Management System 3.0 by using the new importer/exporter tool. Together with regular updates to data security enhancements, these features make the system a future-proof investment - suitable for office and government buildings, retail environments, educational institutions, and more. Easy configuration and operation Access Management System 3.0 also has trusted digital certificates for mutual authenticationConfiguration is easy: Users can import existing floor maps into the system, and drag and drop icons on the map to represent controllers, doors, and building objects. User onboarding is straightforward. For example, enrolment and assignment of access profiles are all implemented in one dialogue manager. Operation is smooth: The graphical user interface (GUI) is simple and easy to understand. The dark colour scheme of the GUI reduces eye-strain and fatigue, so operators stay fresh and alert. Access Management System 3.0 offers protection against cybercrime and loss of personal data. The database, as well as the communication between the server and access controllers, is encrypted at all stages through the support of the secure Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP) v2 protocol. Access Management System 3.0 also has trusted digital certificates for mutual authentication between the server and client to prevent tampering by unauthorised clients and uses secure design principles such as “secure-by-default” and “principle of least privilege.” Integration with third-party solutions Access Management System 3.0 is ideal as a standalone solution to meet today’s access control needs. It integrates seamlessly with Bosch B Series and G Series intrusion control panels as well as with video systems such as Bosch Video Management System or third-party systems like Milestone’s XProtect for increased security and enhanced situational awareness. The integrated command and control functionality enables operators to arm and disarm intrusion panels directlyIntegration with Bosch Video Management System (version 10.1 and higher) offers manual video verification to increase the security level at doors. The operator can visually verify whether the person at the door matches the registered person in the database. If so, the operator allows the person to enter. Bosch Video Management System integration also enables searching for cardholder events and events at doors. With the searching functionality, it is possible to quickly check who has entered an area and at what time. Moreover, access commands and events can be handled in Bosch Video Management System, making the operation of the integrated system most efficient. Intrusion control panels integration B and G Series intrusion control panels integrate seamlessly into Access Management System 3.0 for efficient authorisation management and a central overview of all access and intrusion events. With central user management, operators can add, delete, and modify intrusion-related user passcodes and authorisations directly into the system, as well as organise users by groups or functionalities. The integrated command and control functionality enables operators to arm and disarm intrusion panels directly in the Access Management System 3.0 user interface as well as to see states of the areas (e.g. “armed”, “ready to arm”) and detectors (e.g. “motion detected”) on the system map. This provides operators with a central overview of all access and intrusion states, allowing them to easily and remotely handle intrusion events. Bosch Access Management System 3.0 is available for sale and makes access management simple, scalable, and always available.

Open Security and Safety Alliance announce commercial video security cameras and Application Interface Specification
Open Security and Safety Alliance announce commercial video security cameras and Application Interface Specification

The Open Security & Safety Alliance (OSSA), an industry body comprised of influencers and innovative organisations from all facets of the security, safety and building automation space, announced a series of milestones achieved in the past 20 months since the Alliance opened its doors. Significant markers include the OSSA common Technology Stack and two resulting specifications, the introduction of the first OSSA-inspired digital marketplace, and the newly unveiled “Driven by OSSA” designation for the first commercially available video security devices based on the Alliance philosophy and purpose. These accomplishments roll up into the organisation’s overall vision of ‘one global approach to fuel the creation of new value within the security and safety space.’ Consistency across video security devices The OSSA-orchestrated ecosystem is designed to enhance trust, and to enable innovation and opportunity for industry stakeholders and customers. The initiative is anchored by OSSA’s first Technology Stack, which describes the fundamental thoughts on how to create harmony across video security devices to enhance trust and enable innovation. Under the umbrella of this guiding document, and further solidifying it, the Alliance is now launching the first two in a series of technical specifications, being: OSSA Application Interface Specification This technical specification (available to OSSA members only) defines a set of four interfaces which collectively enable third-party software applications to run on video security cameras following the Technology Stack. The input stream describes the video frames and messages the applications can subscribe to. The web API describes how applications can make use of the camera’s webserver to support, configuration and data upload to the application. The system APIs provide system information regarding OS version, capabilities and information about the video security camera. This is needed to understand the features and APIs that are available on the cameras to make use of device-specific functionality. The streaming application model allows applications to interact with each other. Apps can share their results, such as events and scene descriptions, with other apps on the device or (video management) software in the network. OSSA Compliant Device Definition Specification This technical specification sets the core system requirements for video security cameras following the OSSA Technology Stack to provide a basis of trust and for app interoperability across vendors. This spec is publicly available. The First “Driven by OSSA” Commercial Cameras Camera manufacturers have started to introduce to the market, devices designed to reduce fragmentation and orchestrate harmony within an open ecosystem for the surveillance industry. The first manufacturers to launch cameras based on OSSA’s Technology Stack include Topview/Qisda, Ability/AndroVideo, Bosch (through their INTEOX camera line), VIVOTEK and Hanwha Techwin. The first commercially available products based on the specifications set forth by the Alliance, OSSA will receive a signage mark for video security cameras. Companies that use this “Driven by OSSA” signage: Are full OSSA members; have signed the OSSA by-laws guiding amongst other things minimum requirements regarding data security and privacy protection. Follow the OSSA Technology Stack for video security devices that prescribes the use of an open operating system (OS). Security & Safety Things, an OSSA member company, developed the open OS and made it available to OSSA members. Ensure seamless connectivity within one centralised digital marketplace. Offer the ability to install and execute third-party apps on their cameras. One Centralised Digital Marketplace OSSA is driving the creation of one centralised marketplace to unite demand and supply in the market. Camera devices that are built in accordance with OSSA’s Technology Stack, so-called “Driven by OSSA” devices, can benefit from this marketplace which consists of (1) a development environment (2) an application store and (3) a device management portal. System integrators, using the application store, can deploy available apps across devices, in a brand independent manner, to meet specific customer requirements. App developers will find in the development environment comprehensive tools, documentation and libraries to develop new software applications. These new apps can then be offered for sale through the application store. “This is an exciting time for security and safety professionals as the main industry players pivot together in a new direction based on digital connections afforded by the IoT,” said Johan Jubbega, President, Open Security & Safety Alliance. “In these current times of global change and uncertainty, it’s of vital importance that we persist in our quest for new market opportunities and current market efficiencies, and we’re proud to be facilitating this movement that is shaping the future of the security and safety systems environment.”

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