Access Professional Edition 2.1
Access Professional Edition 2.1

Bosch Security Systems further enhances its widely-used access control solution for small and medium-sized companies with the Access Professional Edition (APE) 2.1 which will be released soon. Thanks to new interfaces, an even larger number of devices and operating systems are now compatible.Since its initial launch, the easy-to-use, scalable access control software APE meets an extensive range of security requirements and assures an easy integration of access control with a variety of security functions, such as CCTV, intrusion detection or elevator management. In its updated version, APE features an optimised support of the most common operating systems, such as Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 and Windows XP. Furthermore it enables a seamless interconnectivity with Bosch HD cameras and the midrange recorders Divar 400 and Divar 600.With APE, Bosch offers a multifunctional, extremely reliable yet flexible solution for a variety of small to midsized establishments such as office buildings, laboratories, schools or the likes. The system is capable of handling up to 10.000 cardholders. In total 128 readers and 128 cameras can be managed. The access modes ‘card', ‘pin' or ‘card and pin' provide individual levels of security."APE is very popular with our clients, as it caters to all common security requirements and offers a number of additional, handy features", says Patrick Looijmans at Bosch Security Systems. By displaying the database photo and a live image recorded at the door, as well as basic cardholder data with the time stamp of access request for example, the software helps the operator to instantly verify that card and cardholder are matching. Also a fast tracking of persons in the building is possible, which is particularly helpful in case of an emergency. Using the integrated card configuration function furthermore increases the security as badges can be designed according to corporate guidelines and persons can be identified throughout the entire premises. "All in all APE is a modern, straightforward all-round solution, which just got even better in its latest version 2.1", says Patrick Looijmans.

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The new age of access control from Bosch
The new age of access control from Bosch

Access control has become a vital component of any security concept worldwide. The protection of intellectual property rights, prevention of theft and sabotage or simply compliance requirements - there are a multitude of reasons why companies of all kinds need to use a comprehensive access control system to restrict, manage and control access to their facilities. However, operated in isolation from other safety and security systems, even the most sophisticated access control system cannot really live up to its promises. In such an environment, operation and monitoring can quickly turn into a nightmare, as each system has its own architecture, its own user interface and its own management tool. This is why more and more organizations are looking out for an access control solution that easily integrates with video monitoring, intrusion detection and sometimes even visitor management to form a homogeneous security system with a consistent user interface and central management and operations.Moreover, suppliers are more and more often faced with requirements of their customers to supply a documentation of all access attempts, whether successful or not, to protect against industrial espionage. To fulfill this requirement, not only employee access must be captured and recorded, but also the entire visitor traffic. Video integration for more safetyWhile modern access control systems allow an efficient management of access rights, they are rather powerless against abuse if operated on their own. In critical environments it is mandatory to add a second layer of security by integrating access control with some kind of video surveillance. To prevent abuse, all access requests can then trigger one or more video cameras. Integrated systems can provide alarm verification, instantly displaying live video images from nearby cameras when there is an alarm event at a door - such as when a person presents an unauthorised credential or when a door is forced open. Forensics can also benefit from such integration if the video recordings are referenced in the access control system's event log. Such a feature greatly facilitates identification, retrieval and playback of past events and alarms if necessary.Open standards ease integrationIntegrating access control, video monitoring, and intrusion detection can be rather easy when all components come from the same vendor and if this vendor also offers a management platform like the Building Integration System from Bosch for all of them. Integrated systems "off the shelf" can greatly ease installation and configuration of the security solution. Logical integration eliminates the need for multiple software platform and interfaces -- resulting in fewer complications and greater event-driven functionality as well as reduced installation time and costs. What's more, this kind of integration also promises more efficient operation and a clearly reduced need for training, but above all also a higher security level. An open standards-based management system even makes sense in those cases where one vendor supplies everything, as it opens up the entire installation for future expansion.User interface is keyAn integrated security system is a very complex apparatus, and if this complexity is not hidden from the user, the system will be highly prone to human error and maloperation. Such systems do need very clear and intuitive user interfaces, avoiding information overload while offering all the information that is currently needed. This is even more important when several components or dialogs are open, which will often be the case if you deal with access control, video surveillance and maybe intrusion detection from the same console.

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Bosch benefits from increasing awareness for its access control solutions
Bosch benefits from increasing awareness for its access control solutions

Following the Security 2010 exhibition in Essen, Germany, it is evident that Bosch is receiving increased awareness for its investment in the access control and integrated systems markets. While the Bosch booth has traditionally been popular for its video, communications, intrusion detection, and fire prevention solutions, this year Bosch saw an exponential increase of interest in the access control and integrated systems offerings, making it yet one of the areas of highest growth potential.In Essen, Bosch showcased its complete portfolio of access control and integrated systems solutions. Customers were able to see and experience solutions for small, mid-sized and large environments: the Access Easy Control System supporting up to 32 readers, the reliable 128-reader Access Professional Edition system, and the Building Integration System (BIS) software. The BIS software system is used to connect all security, safety, and building automation components and to integrate them into one central and comprehensive management system.Further to the enhancement of the portfolio itself, Bosch is increasing its market presence with additional service offerings and more trained marketing and salespeople to answer the growing demand. According to Alex Squarize, Bosch Security Systems, "Bosch is absolutely in a good position for future growth. The investment in research and development over the past years has already started to pay off. We are adding to our portfolio day after day, while we continue to invest into training and development of our employees. No other company in the market is currently investing as much into access control and integrated systems solutions.""The future outlook remains positive", Squarize continues. "We are currently seeing more and more implementations of these Bosch solutions, and we are experiencing substantial growth in both geographical reach and quantity. We look forward to 2011 with optimism!"Download PDF of Bosch Access Easy Control system

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Extended set of benefits: new version of Building Integration System from Bosch to be launched
Extended set of benefits: new version of Building Integration System from Bosch to be launched

Including interface advancements, enlarged vendor independency and compatibility with the latest Windows Internet Explorer 9, Bosch Security Systems introduces a number of updates to its Building Integration System (BIS). The new version 2.5, which is available from early May 2012, increases the range of supported devices to more than 1,000 different third party cameras and encoders, making it suitable for even the most complex integration projects. The new system allows further optimized security, safety and communication management in one front-end system with customized user interface. The range of video devices supported by BIS 2.5 is unmatched in the industry. It seamlessly interoperates with virtually any video camera, connecting to the latest IP cameras on the market with HD and H.264 encoding technology. The Divar 700 and Bosch Recording Station are supported in their most recent versions. BIS 2.5 benefits installers and end users alike: certified BIS partners and systems integrators enjoy an upgraded level of customization options, such as new layout formats for a wide range of monitor sizes (including 16:9 and 16:10). Thanks to numerous handy improvements, such as useful additions to the symbol libraries, it is now even easier to personalize the system. BIS 2.5 is interoperable with the large variety of ONVIF-compatible, modern IP-based video products supplied by all major manufacturers. ONVIF ensures a uniform standard, allowing customers to choose the product that best fits their individual needs, without having to worry about compatibility. It thereby saves costs and allows long term planning. The ONVIF standard was first introduced by a consortium of companies, including founding member Bosch, in 2008.

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Access control software - Expert commentary

We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?
We have the technology to make society safer – how long can we justify not using it?

While the application of facial recognition within both public and private spheres continues to draw criticism from those who see it as a threat to civil rights, this technology has become extremely commonplace in the lives of iPhone users. It is so prevalent, in fact, that by 2024 it is predicted that 90% of smartphones will use biometric facial recognition hardware. CCTV surveillance cameras  Similarly, CCTV is a well-established security measure that many of us are familiar with, whether through spotting images displayed on screens in shops, hotels and offices, or noticing cameras on the side of buildings. It is therefore necessary we ask the question of why, when facial recognition is integrated with security surveillance technology, does it become such a source of contention? It is not uncommon for concerns to be voiced against innovation. History has taught us that it is human nature to fear the unknown, especially if it seems that it may change life as we know it. Yet technology is an ever-changing, progressive part of the 21st century and it is important we start to shift the narrative away from privacy threats, to the force for good that LFR (Live Facial Recognition) represents. Live Facial Recognition (LFR) We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition Across recent weeks, we have seen pleas from UK organisations to allow better police access to facial recognition technology in order to fight crime. In the US, there are reports that LAPD is the latest police force to be properly regulating its use of facial recognition to aid criminal investigations, which is certainly a step in the right direction. While it is understandable that society fears technology that they do not yet understand, this lack of knowledge is exactly why the narrative needs to shift. We understand the arguments from those that fear the ethics of AI and the data collection within facial recognition, we respect these anxieties. However, it is time to level the playing field of the facial recognition debate and communicate the plethora of benefits it offers society. Facial recognition technology - A force for good Facial recognition technology has already reached such a level of maturity and sophistication that there are huge opportunities for it to be leveraged as a force for good in real-world scenarios. As well as making society safer and more secure, I would go as far to say that LFR is able to save lives. One usage that could have a dramatic effect on reducing stress in people with mental conditions is the ability for facial recognition to identify those with Alzheimer’s. If an older individual is seemingly confused, lost or distressed, cameras could alert local medical centres or police stations of their identity, condition and where they need to go (a home address or a next of kin contact). Granted, this usage would be one that does incorporate a fair bit of personal data, although this information would only be gathered with consent from each individual. Vulnerable people could volunteer their personal data to local watchlists in order to ensure their safety when out in society, as well as to allow quicker resolutions of typically stressful situations. Tracking and finding missing persons Another possibility for real world positives to be drawn from facial recognition is to leverage the technology to help track or find missing persons, a lost child for instance. The most advanced forms of LFR in the market are now able to recognise individuals even if up to 50% of their face is covered and from challenging or oblique angles. Therefore, there is a significant opportunity not only to return people home safely, more quickly, but also reduce police hours spent on analysing CCTV footage. Rapid scanning of images Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match Facial recognition technology can rapidly scan images for a potential match, as a more reliable and less time-consuming option than the human alternative. Freed-up officers could also then work more proactively on the ground, patrolling their local areas and increasing community safety and security twofold. It is important to understand that these facial recognition solutions should not be applied to every criminal case, and the technology must be used responsibly. However, these opportunities to use LFR as force for good are undeniable.   Debunking the myths One of the central concerns around LFR is the breach of privacy that is associated with ‘watchlists’. There is a common misconception, however, that the data of every individual that passes a camera is processed and then stored. The reality is that watch lists are compiled with focus on known criminals, while the general public can continue life as normal. The very best facial recognition will effectively view a stream of blurred faces, until it detects one that it has been programmed to recognise. For example, an individual that has previously shoplifted from a local supermarket may have their biometric data stored, so when they return to that location the employees are alerted to a risk of further crimes being committed. Considering that the cost of crime prevention to retailers in recent years has been around £1 billion, which therefore impacts consumer prices and employee wages, security measures to tackle this issue are very much in the public interest. Most importantly, the average citizen has no need to fear being ‘followed’ by LFR cameras. If data is stored, it is for a maximum of 0.6 seconds before being deleted. Privacy Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story Privacy is ingrained in facial recognition solutions, yet it seems the debate often ignores this side of the story. It is essential we spend more time and effort communicating exactly why watchlists are made, who they are made for and how they are being used, if we want to de-bunk myths and change the narrative. As science and technology professionals, heading up this exciting innovation, we must put transparency and accountability at the centre of what we do. Tony Porter, former Surveillance Camera Commissioner and current CPO at Corsight AI, has previously worked on developing processes that audit and review watch lists. Such restrictions are imperative in order for AI and LFR to be used legally, as well as ethically and responsibly. Biometrics, mask detection and contactless payments Nevertheless, the risks do not outweigh the benefits. Facial recognition should and can be used for good in so many more ways than listed above, including biometric, contactless payments, detecting whether an individual is wearing a facemask and is therefore, safe to enter a building, identifying a domestic abuse perpetrator returning to the scene of a crime and alerting police. There are even opportunities for good that we have not thought of yet. It is therefore not only a waste not to use this technology where we can, prioritising making society a safer place, it is immoral to stand by and let crimes continue while we have effective, reliable mitigation solutions.  

Unlocking human-like perception in sensor-based technology deployments
Unlocking human-like perception in sensor-based technology deployments

Like most industries, the fields of security, access and safety have been transformed by technology, with AI-driven automation presenting a clear opportunity for players seeking growth and leadership when it comes to innovation. In this respect, these markets know exactly what they want. They require solutions that accurately (without false or negative positives) classify and track people and/or vehicles as well as the precise location and interactions between those objects. They want to have access to accurate data generated by best-of-class solutions irrespective of the sensor modality. And, they need to be able to easily deploy such solutions, at the lowest capex and opex, with the knowledge that they can be integrated with preferred VMSs and PSIMs, be highly reliable, have low install and maintenance overheads and be well supported. With these needs in mind, camera and computer vision technology providers, solutions providers and systems integrators are forging ahead and have created exemplary ecosystems with established partnerships helping to accelerate adoption. At the heart of this are AI and applications of Convolutional neural networks (CNN), an architecture often used in computer vision deep learning algorithms, which are accomplishing tasks that were extremely difficult with traditional software. But what about 3D sensing technologies and perception? The security, safety and access market have an additional crucial need: they must mitigate risk and make investments that deliver for the long-term. This means that if a systems integrator invests in a 3D sensing data perception platform today, it will support their choice of sensors, perception strategies, applications and use cases over time without having to constantly reinvest in alternative computer hardware and perception software each time they adopt new technology or systems. This begs the question - if the security industry knows what it needs, why is it yet to fully embrace 3D sensing modalities? Perception strategy Intelligent perception strategies are yet to evolve which sees designers lock everything down at the design phase Well, one problem facing security, safety and access solutions providers, systems integrators and end-users when deploying first-generation 3D sensing-based solutions is the current approach. Today, intelligent perception strategies have yet to evolve beyond the status quo which sees designers lock everything down at the design phase, including the choice of the sensor(s), off-the-shelf computer hardware and any vendor-specific or 3rd party perception software algorithms and deep learning or artificial intelligence. This approach not only builds in constraints for future use-cases and developments, it hampers the level of perception developed by the machine. Indeed, the data used to develop or train the perception algorithms for security, access and safety use cases at design time is typically captured for a narrow and specific set of scenarios or contexts and are subsequently developed or trained in the lab. Technology gaps As those in this industry know too well, siloed solutions and technology gaps typically block the creation of productive ecosystems and partnerships while lack of commercial whole products can delay market adoption of new innovation. Perception systems architectures today do not support the real-time adaptation of software and computing engines in the field. They remain the same as those selected during the design phase and are fixed for the entire development and the deployment stage. Crucially, this means that the system cannot deal with the unknowns of contextually varying real-time situations where contexts are changing (e.g being able to reflex to security situations they haven’t been trained for) and where the autonomous system’s perception strategies need to dynamically adjust accordingly. Ultimately, traditional strategies have non-scalable and non-adaptable competing computing architectures that were not designed to process the next generation of algorithms, deep learning and artificial intelligence required for 3D sensor mixed workloads. What this means for industries seeking to develop or deploy perception systems, like security, access and safety, is that the available computing architectures are generic and designed for either graphic rendering or data processing. Solutions providers, therefore, have little choice but to promote these architectures heavily into the market. Consequently, the resulting computing techniques are defined by the computing providers and not by the software developers working on behalf of the customer deploying the security solution. Context…. we don’t know what we don’t know Perception platform must have the ability to adjust to changes in context, thereby improving the performance post-deployment To be useful and useable in the security context and others, a perception platform must have the ability to adjust to changes in context, can self-optimise and crucially, can self-learn, thereby improving the performance post-deployment. The combinations of potential contextual changes in a real-life environment, such as an airport or military base, are innumerable, non-deterministic, real-time, often analogue and unpredictable. The moment sensors, edge computing hardware and perception software are deployed in the field, myriad variables such as weather, terrain as well as sensor mounting location and orientation all represent a context shift where the perception systems’ solution is no longer optimal. For example, it might be that a particular sensor system is deployed in an outdoor scenario with heavy foliage. Because the algorithm development or training was completed in the lab, the moving foliage, bushes or low trees and branches are classified as humans or some other false-positive result. Typically, heavy software customisation and onsite support then ensue, requiring on-site support by solutions vendors where each and every sensor configuration needs to be hand-cranked to deliver something that is acceptable to the end customer. A new approach for effective perception strategies Cron AI is building senseEDGE, which represents a significant evolution in the development of sensing to information strategy.  It is a 3D sensing perception and computer vision platform built from the ground up to address and remove the traditional deployment and performance bottlenecks we’ve just described. senseEDGE is aware of the user application reaction plan indication to trigger an alarm or turning on a CCTV camera The entire edge platform is built around a real-time scalable and adaptable computing architecture that’s flexible enough for algorithms and software to scale and adapt to different workloads and contexts. What’s more, it has real-time contextual awareness, which means that the entire edge platform is, at any time, aware of the external context, the sensor and sensor architecture and the requirements of the user application. Furthermore, when it produces the object output data, it also aware of the user application reaction plan indication, which could be triggering an alarm or turning on a CCTV camera when a specific action is detected. This approach turns traditional perception strategies on their head: it is software-defined programmable perception and computing architecture, not hardware-defined. It is free from the constraints imposed by traditional CPU or GPU compute dictated by hardware architecture providers and not limited to the perception built defined during design time. And, being fully configurable, it can be moved from one solution to another, providing computation for different modalities of sensors designed for different use cases or environments, and lower risk of adoption and migration for those developing the security solution.  Future perception requirements senseEDGE is also able to scale to future perception requirements, such as algorithms and workloads produced by future sensors as well as computational techniques and neural networks that have yet to be invented. Meanwhile, latency versus throughput is totally software-defined and not limited by providers of computing architecture. Finally, contextually aware, it is fully connected to the real world where the reflexes adapt to even the subtlest changes in context, which makes all the difference in time and accuracy in critical security situations. This is how CronAI sees the future of perception. It means that security and safety innovators can now access and invest with low risk in a useable and scalable perception solution that can truly take advantage of current and future 3D sensor modalities.

Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre
Safety in smart cities: How video surveillance keeps security front and centre

Urban populations are expanding rapidly around the globe, with an expected growth of 1.56 billion by 2040. As the number of people living and working in cities continues to grow, the ability to keep everyone safe is an increasing challenge. However, technology companies are developing products and solutions with these futuristic cities in mind, as the reality is closer than you may think. Solutions that can help to watch over public places and share data insights with city workers and officials are increasingly enabling smart cities to improve the experience and safety of the people who reside there. Rising scope of 5G, AI, IoT and the Cloud The main foundations that underpin smart cities are 5G, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Cloud. Each is equally important, and together, these technologies enable city officials to gather and analyse more detailed insights than ever before. For public safety in particular, having IoT and cloud systems in place will be one of the biggest factors to improving the quality of life for citizens. Smart cities have come a long way in the last few decades, but to truly make a smart city safe, real-time situational awareness and cross-agency collaboration are key areas which must be developed as a priority. Innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns Public places need to be safe, whether that is an open park, shopping centre, or the main roads through towns. From dangerous drivers to terrorist attacks, petty crime on the streets to high profile bank robberies, innovative surveillance cameras with integrated IoT and cloud technologies can go some way to helping respond quickly to, and in some cases even prevent, the most serious incidents. Many existing safety systems in cities rely on aging and in some places legacy technology, such as video surveillance cameras. Many of these also use on-premises systems rather than utilising the benefits of the cloud. Smart programming to deliver greater insights These issues, though not creating a major problem today, do make it more challenging for governments and councils to update their security. Changing every camera in a city is a huge undertaking, but in turn, doing so would enable all cameras to be connected to the cloud, and provide more detailed information which can be analysed by smart programming to deliver greater insights. The physical technologies that are currently present in most urban areas lack the intelligent connectivity, interoperability and integration interfaces that smart cities need. Adopting digital technologies isn’t a luxury, but a necessity. Smart surveillance systems It enables teams to gather data from multiple sources throughout the city in real-time, and be alerted to incidents as soon as they occur. Increased connectivity and collaboration ensures that all teams that need to be aware of a situation are informed instantly. For example, a smart surveillance system can identify when a road accident has occurred. It can not only alert the nearest ambulance to attend the scene, but also the local police force to dispatch officers. An advanced system that can implement road diversions could also close roads around the incident immediately and divert traffic to other routes, keeping everyone moving and avoiding a build-up of vehicles. This is just one example: without digital systems, analysing patterns of vehicle movements to address congestion issues could be compromised, as would the ability to build real-time crime maps and deploy data analytics which make predictive policing and more effective crowd management possible. Cloud-based technologies Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation Cloud-based technologies provide the interoperability, scalability and automation that is needed to overcome the limitations of traditional security systems. Using these, smart cities can develop a fully open systems architecture that delivers interoperation with both local and other remote open systems. The intelligence of cloud systems can not only continue to allow for greater insights as technology develops over time, but it can do so with minimal additional infrastructure investment. Smart surveillance in the real world Mexico City has a population of almost 9 million people, but if you include the whole metropolitan area, this number rises sharply to over 21 million in total, making it one of the largest cities on the planet. Seven years ago, the city first introduced its Safe City initiative, and ever since has been developing newer and smarter ways to keep its citizens safe. In particular, its cloud-based security initiative is making a huge impact. Over the past three years, Mexico City has installed 58,000 new video surveillance cameras throughout the city, in public spaces and on transport, all of which are connected to the City’s C5 (Command, Control, Computers, Communications and Citizen Contact) facility. Smart Cities operations The solution enables officers as well as the general public to upload videos via a mobile app to share information quickly, fixed, body-worn and vehicle cameras can also be integrated to provide exceptional insight into the city’s operations. The cloud-based platform can easily be upgraded to include the latest technology innovations such as licence plate reading, behavioural analysis software, video analytics and facial recognition software, which will all continue to bring down crime rates and boost response times to incidents. The right cloud approach Making the shift to cloud-based systems enables smart cities to eliminate dependence on fibre-optic connectivity and take advantage of a variety of Internet and wireless connectivity options that can significantly reduce application and communication infrastructure costs. Smart cities need to be effective in years to come, not just in the present day, or else officials have missed one of the key aspects of a truly smart city. System designers must build technology foundations now that can be easily adapted in the future to support new infrastructure as it becomes available. Open system architecture An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations For example, this could include opting for a true cloud application that can support cloud-managed local devices and automate their management. An open system architecture will also be vital for smart cities to enhance their operations and deliver additional value-add services to citizens as greater capabilities become possible in the years to come. The advances today in cloud and IoT technologies are rapid, and city officials and authorities have more options now to develop their smart cities than ever before and crucially, to use these innovations to improve public safety. New safety features Though implementing these cloud-based systems now requires investment, as new safety features are designed, there will be lower costs and challenges associated with introducing these because the basic infrastructure will already exist. Whether that’s gunshot detection or enabling the sharing of video infrastructure and data across multiple agencies in real time, smart video surveillance on cloud-based systems can bring a wealth of the new opportunities.

Latest Bosch Security Systems news

Bosch releases a new version of AIoT video software solution supporting safe social distancing
Bosch releases a new version of AIoT video software solution supporting safe social distancing

The latest release of ‘Intelligent Insights’ from Bosch offers a software widget update that supports safe social distancing. Intelligent Insights is an ‘AIoT’ video software solution – which combines the connectivity of physical products with the application of artificial intelligence (AI) – that gives customers the power to predict based on live and historical data. Intelligent Insights taps data from Bosch video cameras with built-in AI and pulls it into a single dashboard to support informed decision-making before a potential situation occurs. Minimising coronavirus spread One of the most notable changes caused by the current pandemic is social distancing. Maintaining a precise distance and upholding a maximum threshold of people in gathering areas such as workplaces, shopping centers, and train stations has become critical to minimise coronavirus spread (COVID-19). In light of the challenges imposed by this situation, Intelligent Insights supports social distancing regulations with its latest software widget update. Intelligent Insights supports social distancing regulations with its latest software widget update The new Area fill level traffic light widget offers an intuitive graphical interface that helps users comply with social distancing regulations. The widget visualises the current and maximum number of people allowed in a particular area at a specific time. It illustrates three different states – normal, serious, and critical – as green, yellow, or red, along with corresponding info text, so the user instantly knows when to take action. Traffic light widget Users can opt to live stream the Area fill level traffic light widget on a monitor at an entrance to a supermarket or grocery store, for example, to inform customers whether they may enter the store. When a threshold is reached, the widget can activate and trigger a connected device that will inform visitors with a public announcement, simple alert, or message displayed on a monitor. Intelligent Insights uses built-in AI from Bosch cameras to interpret video images and captures camera metadata from situations involving moving objects, people counting, and crowd detection. The software tool then collects, aggregates, and displays this information using a series of pre-defined widgets enabling users to visualise and evaluate a complete scene from a simple overview screen. Intelligence beyond security Users can select the needed widgets to provide the required information to help predict unwanted situations The dashboard enables users to quickly understand what they see, which helps them respond before a potential situation occurs and delivers business intelligence beyond security. For detailed post-analysis and to help users adjust and alter future actions, Intelligent Insights offers a report function. Intelligent Insights comes with a series of intuitive dashboard widgets that enable users to evaluate a complete scene to support security, safety, and well-being in varying applications. Depending on the application, users can select the needed widgets to provide the required information to help predict unwanted situations or uncover new opportunities. Object positioning widget Area fill level, Occupancy counting, and Crowd detection offer the ability to monitor and detect crowds accurately and count individuals and objects. The user can specify the desired occupancy rate of an area by determining the maximum number of people allowed to be in that area within a given time. Intelligent Insights also offers Object counting and People counting to count objects or people accurately such as when entering or leaving a building. These widgets help identify peak and low times on specific days or over an extended period. Intelligent Insights uses only anonymous data from cameras, ensuring people’s privacy is protected at all times. With the Object positioning widget, users can get a real-time overview of all objects moving in a specific area. Based on their GPS position, which can be determined by cameras that feature built-in AI, the objects are plotted onto a map and classified with icons. Video management system Intelligent Insights, an AIoT video software solution from Bosch, supports social distancing regulations, helps customers respond before a potential situation occurs, and delivers business intelligence beyond security. Intelligent Insights is not only a powerful standalone software package but also designed for seamless integration with other software solutions like the video management system of Bosch (BVMS).

Bosch secures Granarolo plant at Soliera with their Intelligent Video Analytics system
Bosch secures Granarolo plant at Soliera with their Intelligent Video Analytics system

Situated near the picturesque small town of Soliera in northern Italy, the dairy plant of Italian food company Granarolo is anything but small: More than 600 farmers, 70 trucks for the collection of milk and 720 vehicles handle 850,000 tons of milk every year. Its dairy products such as milk, yogurt, ice cream, cheese, and lately also ham and pasta, supply several million Italian families every day. The plant’s huge production capacity is reflected in the size of the perimeter: The Soliera facility stretches out over 45,000 square metres. Furthermore, it is located near a wooded land which is important when it comes to designing a security system aimed at protecting the plant against intrusion. Video surveillance system Granarolo wanted to replace an old analogue video surveillance system by a digital one as its security challenges exceeded the limits of the old installation. The project posed several challenges. The most significant being the vast area of the factory itself, as well as the location of the perimeter near an area that can only be poorly overseen. Since the factory is located in a heavily wooded area, building an appropriate video security system is more challenging because it needs to be safeguarded against false alarms, triggered by ever-changing lights, shadows and the constant movement of trees and plants. Tackling these challenges, Naples-based Bosch partner Gruppo Sirio worked out the modernisation of the plant’s security system, with Bosch cameras featuring built-in Intelligent Video Analytics (IVA) at the heart of the system. Detecting suspicious objects Bosch provided a video surveillance system with 48 cameras of the Dinion series With the help of the security cameras’ integrated video analytics, virtual lines were drawn around the area to be protected against intrusion. When these lines are crossed by intruders, the programmed rules automatically generate alarms, alerting on-site security personnel to intervene. Whether the cameras are tasked with detecting suspicious objects or unusual movements in daylight or night-time, constant surveillance with a special focus on sensitive areas ensures security. In total, Bosch provided a video surveillance system with 48 cameras of the Dinion series. The system, which is managed on one central platform, is completely autonomous and entirely separate from any other system or network in the plant. This ensures maximum security even in the event of potential failures of other systems on site. Perimeter protection solution As a result of the modernisation process, Granarolo can now rely on a system specifically designed for its needs. The newly established, digital video surveillance and perimeter protection solution supports the security personnel in maintaining maximum levels of security through the entire area. It also guarantees that food safety standards in the protected facility are guarded against outside influences. Ultimately, the system allows the staff to fully focus on keeping the production running at all times, thereby contributing to secure the sensitive chain of the Italian food supply against interruptions.

Bosch Security Systems unveil version 4.8 of its Building Integration System to enable a safe and contactless access control environment
Bosch Security Systems unveil version 4.8 of its Building Integration System to enable a safe and contactless access control environment

Bosch Security Systems has released version 4.8 of its Building Integration System (BIS) which offers safe, touchless access control solutions to curb the spread of viruses like Covid-19. Secure access control solution BIS 4.8 supports biometric and mobile device authentication and provides building managers enhanced integration of fire panels and intrusion panels to ensure the security of buildings. The global COVID-19 pandemic has caused building operators to rethink their access control solutions In light of the global COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic, building operators need to rethink their access control solutions. Instead of systems that require physical touch and thereby increase the risk of virus transmission, contactless solutions that still meet the highest security guidelines are preferable. BIS 4.8, Building Integration System In response to these requirements, BIS 4.8 expands on the trusted features and benefits of version 4.7 to now work with three different touchless solutions that safeguard personal health: Face recognition - BIS 4.8 has been redesigned to work with the face recognition solution from Idemia. The face recognition device obtains a biometric scan from a safe distance and matches facial features with credentials in an encrypted database. Doors and gates open via the BIS Access Engine and the Bosch Access Modular Controller (AMC2). Touchless fingerprint readers - Integrated with Idemia’s Morphowave reader, BIS 4.8 controls access via a touchless fingerprint scan. A simple wave of the hand in front of the touchless sensor triggers a 3D scan of four fingers. Access rights are confirmed within less than one second by the system's fingerprint database for a clean and highly secure solution. Access via mobile phones - In conjunction with the mobile access control solutions from STid and HID, BIS 4.8 allows users to use their mobile phone instead of a card for access at the secure reader. For STid’s Mobile ID, the method requires a STid reader, while a Bosch Lectus secure reader works with HID’s Mobile Access solution. Users only need to install an app to verify access rights and use the safe, wireless technology. Aside from facilitating contactless access, all three solutions are also intuitive, quick and convenient compared to keycards and similar methods as there is no need to carry an access card or remember a password in order to gain entry to a building or area. Seamless fire and intrusion panel integration Combining BIS 4.8 with Bosch B and G Series intrusion panels unlock a new level of convenience Combining BIS 4.8 with Bosch B and G Series intrusion panels or MAP 5000 panels unlocks a new level of convenience. Users require only one authorisation badge to control two systems. Disarming areas of the intrusion system and granting access can be realised with the same badge on the same reader, without entering a PIN code for easy, one-step authorisation. Improved flexibility and efficiency With the introduction of version 4.8, BIS continues to unify the management of multiple security and safety domains and maximise flexibility for key customer requirements. New features include: Integration of the latest Bosch Avenar 2000 and 8000 fire panels and peripherals, along with command and control via BIS, with devices and status shown on maps, and events managed more intuitively via an alarm list. User authorisation for Bosch B and G Series intrusion panels are managed directly within BIS for up to 2,000 users on as many as 25 intrusion panels, instead of handling authorisations separately on each of the 25 panels. Central overview of all existing access and B and G Series intrusion authorisations for the complete installation within one system. With these updates, BIS 4.8 helps operators meet the health and safety demands of the new reality without compromising on functionality and security. As a centralised platform for operational building management, the new version of BIS offers greater convenience, flexibility, and efficiency.

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