Hirsch's Velocity Security Management System on show at ISC West
Hirsch's Velocity Security Management System on show at ISC West

Velocity Security Management SystemHirsch's Velocity delivers total security in an all-in-one package: Access control: readers, keypads, biometrics, controllers for doors, gates, elevatorsAlarm monitoring, intrusion detection: sensors, alarm routing, automated responses, history/reports Video, CCTV: cameras, DVRs, links to analyticsIdentification management: smart cards, photo badges, integration with IDMS, CMS, watch listsInteroperability: with personnel system, network log-on, provisioning, command & control, central station, parking, HVAC, lighting, other devices, other databasesVelocity is network-ready & IT friendly.  Velocity employs IT-centric tools such as integration with directory services, encrypted TCP/IP communications, and support of split server configurations and high-availability environments.The system is highly secure, requires little bandwidth, and is scalable to even the largest organisations.  Velocity supports Unified Identity Management with a full line of smart card readers, biometrics and privacy-sensitive keypads.  Velocity's open architecture, SDK, and built-in XML interoperability enable you to integrate Velocity with building automation and other systems.  Velocity is designed to tightly integrate with personnel and network provisioning systems, allowing it to serve as the physical security component of an overall Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) and policy-based security management system.  This approach can help enhance security, improve operational efficiency and reduce administrative and compliance costs.Velocity has earned numerous industry awards including an unprecedented five-time winning of the U.S. Security Industry Association's Product Achievement Award.

Add to Compare

Access control software - Expert commentary

“The potential is enormous” - Interview with Dr. Henrik Siegle, CTO at Bosch Building Technologies
“The potential is enormous” - Interview with Dr. Henrik Siegle, CTO at Bosch Building Technologies

Dr. Henrik Siegle has been the CTO at Bosch Building Technologies since November 2021. In this interview, he speaks about the megatrends of energy efficiency and sustainability, and about new developments in the building technology sector. Dr. Siegle, the building industry is currently facing major challenges in the form of climate change and energy shortages. How is Bosch Building Technologies dealing with these challenges? Dr. Henrik Siegle: Energy efficiency and sustainability have long been key priorities for us – and, indeed, for the entire Bosch Group. For Bosch Building Technologies, this also particularly applies to building automation. We have continually built up our strengths in this area in recent years, including through the takeover of other companies, especially in the United States and Germany – all with the aim of making buildings more energy efficient and more sustainable. We do this in a variety of ways, including automated HVAC control systems based on presence detectors, intelligent lighting and shade control. This approach enables us to optimise the operation of buildings, cut costs for customers and play our part in saving resources. Bosch itself became climate-neutral in 2020. How did you manage that? To achieve climate neutrality, we have implemented measures in four key areas Dr. Henrik Siegle: Bosch started addressing energy efficiency issues early on, which is why the Bosch Group, with more than 400 sites worldwide, is already climate-neutral. To achieve climate neutrality, we have implemented measures in four key areas – increasing energy efficiency, using more renewable energy from our own production, purchasing green energy and, finally, offsetting unavoidable CO2 emissions. We are working on further optimising our mix of measures, because the Bosch Group is totally committed to energy efficiency. We want to promote use of our energy-efficient products, but that’s not all – we are also keen to demonstrate our corporate commitment to sustainability. That’s why we analysed all our divisions, documented energy consumption and developed strategies for each individual division to cut our use of energy further. As the Bosch Building Technologies division, we supply solutions for the Group. One example is our cloud-based energy platform, which is used to analyse the individual energy flows in a factory on a very frequent basis and to predict future consumption. This enables us to continuously optimise our energy consumption at each individual site. The Bosch plant in Homburg is a good example. Since introducing the energy platform there, we have cut CO2 emissions by 6,700 metric tons in the first two years alone – that’s a reduction of 12 percent. At the Bosch Group, we also aim to reduce the CO2 emissions that we don’t generate ourselves directly, but which are produced in the supply chain, for example, or when our products are used. At Bosch, we are aiming to reduce these emissions by 15 percent by 2030. Can you give us some more examples of what Bosch Building Technologies is doing to help improve sustainability? Dr. Henrik Siegle: There are many initiatives and projects underway to increase sustainability at Bosch Building Technologies. One example is an environmentally friendly packaging concept that recently won an award within the Bosch Group. The concept, which involves reusing packaging material, not only significantly reduces the volume of waste, but also speeds up the repackaging processes. What’s more, the optimised size of the packaging also substantially reduces freight and storage volumes, which again cuts CO2 emissions. Our remote services are another fantastic example of the steps we are taking to increase sustainability. By offering our customers remote maintenance, we reduce the working hours involved, but that’s not all – this also prevents our service engineers having to travel to the customers’ premises, which again helps cut CO2 emissions. What is the significance of energy efficiency in the building sector overall? Dr. Henrik Siegle: Alongside industry, the building sector is responsible for approximately 40 percent of total CO2 emissions, so energy efficiency is clearly hugely important. The high proportion of emissions demonstrates the enormous potential for reducing energy consumption in the building sector and what big contribution we can make in this area with our sustainable solutions. Bosch turned the climate neutrality that we achieved as a Group into a business model Bosch turned the climate neutrality that we achieved as a Group into a business model and set up Bosch Climate Solutions GmbH, which is now part of Bosch Building Technologies. This means we are now in a position to offer to develop a climate neutrality strategy for other companies and supply them with the solutions they need through our system integrator. Companies have growing obligations to report on what they are doing to help the environment – and that’s why we’re working together with our partners to develop the building management services suite, or BMSS for short. This open, domain-spanning service offering combines and integrates the individual building systems, services and software solutions from various areas of application. This means the reliable facts about sustainability that are needed for ESG reporting can be generated – in other words, facts that constitute evidence of environmentally friendly operations. When it comes to the demand for energy efficiency solutions, is there such a thing as a typical customer? Dr. Henrik Siegle: We have a huge range of customers – from schools and hospitals to drugstore chains and industrial sites. Bosch Building Technologies offers a smartphone-based solution to provide contactless access to buildings Alongside sustainability, the connection of individual systems in safety and security technology has been a key topic for a long time now. How is Bosch Building Technologies positioning itself here as a full-service provider? Dr. Henrik Siegle: When it comes to connectivity, Bosch Building Technologies benefits hugely from cross-divisional collaboration within the Bosch Group. Overall, connectivity and the Internet of Things (IoT) are topics that we actively addressed at Bosch at a very early stage. As a result, we now have many years of experience of developing relevant technologies and applying these solutions professionally. There are a few solutions, in particular, that really stand out, such as Aviotec, our VdS-approved video-based fire detection system. The system’s security camera performs intelligent video analysis, which means we can detect a fire at a much earlier stage compared to conventional fire detection technology. What’s more, the camera’s built-in intelligence means it can be used for other purposes What’s more, the camera’s built-in intelligence means it can be used for other purposes, too, such as anti-intruder and anti-theft protection. We can also use it to monitor compliance with social distancing rules, for example. This is an innovative example of the connection of domains. However, it also goes without saying that connectivity plays a major role in our business within systems, too. In this context, I would like to mention our connected solutions that make it possible for technical building equipment processes to run as smoothly and efficiently as possible. These solutions include condition monitoring and predictive maintenance, for instance. One example is fire detection systems that independently supply information about their own operating condition and the necessary maintenance intervals. Another example comes from our Access & Intrusion business unit: We now also offer contactless access to buildings via a smartphone-based solution, i.e. via mobile credentials. In your view, what are the current and future market trends in security and building technology? Dr. Henrik Siegle: Well, regardless of market trends, it’s really important to us that we always put the customer at the centre of everything we do. What we want are solutions that meet customers’ needs – both now and in the future. Thanks to our user experience, or UX, method, we have an excellent understanding of what a customer actually wants and needs. That’s why we involve customers in the testing of our innovations as early as possible – it helps us find out whether and how the future product works in practice. We’re therefore always particularly close to our customers. We don’t just develop our products and solutions on this basis, but our services, too. When it comes to video security and intelligent building control in particular, artificial intelligence plays a key role Innovations in building technology are very wide ranging and, in my view, they all revolve around the megatrends of energy efficiency, sustainability, security and artificial intelligence. When it comes to video security and intelligent building control in particular, artificial intelligence plays a key role. This has huge potential – and we want to realise this potential more and more at Bosch. The video-based fire detection system that I’ve already mentioned is an excellent example. The thing that makes us stand out on the market is our business model, which is based on two key pillars. One of these is our system integrator business. This means we offer everything from a single source, right from the initial inquiry, consultancy and planning through to implementation and operation. The second pillar is our product business. The direct customer interface in the system integrator means we get direct feedback in the system integrator itself, both from customers themselves and from our colleagues. We incorporate this feedback into our product development processes. How is your system integrator business doing? Dr. Henrik Siegle: Very well. We’ve experienced good growth in this area in both Europe and North America. What’s more, just recently, we’ve also significantly expanded our system integrator business again through acquisitions in Germany, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. One of our priorities is ensuring that our technology is always state of the art. Developing our expertise in this area also means that regular training for our associates is important, since technical developments are becoming more and more dynamic. Given this background, are you also feeling the impact of the skills shortage? Our business model can only work if we have skilled, motivated associates Dr. Henrik Siegle: It may sound obvious, but needless to say, our business model can only work if we have skilled, motivated associates. The question of how we attract new associates is not the only important one – it’s also vital to consider what we do for the ones we already employ. For example, we have our own academy spread across three sites in Germany, where we provide our associates with regular training, and we also put on a wide range of professional development seminars. To attract new talent, we offer dual study programmes along with programs for trainees, Master’s students and PhD students. We also often attend various career fairs. What’s more, we’re working more closely together with universities and institutes. We have quite a lot to offer in this regard. Our purpose, ‘Building solutions for a better life,’ doesn’t just motivate me personally – it also resonates very well outside Bosch. Bosch gives its associates the opportunity to work directly on important topics of both the present and the future with the aim of making the world a safer, more sustainable place – using state-of-the-art technologies such as artificial intelligence! Nevertheless, the skills shortage naturally still poses a major challenge.

Importance of protecting educational establishments: privacy vs. visibility
Importance of protecting educational establishments: privacy vs. visibility

The UK’s future depends on our children. Within the four walls of classrooms around the country, young minds are inspired, practical skills are learnt, and new passions are established; these will be tapped into by pupils for decades to come. To make sure outmoded security measures are not having an adverse effect on the performance within, we must first examine the limits and physical safeguards around these educational institutions. When planning and building any facility for the education sector, security should be given high consideration from the beginning. Following the COVID pandemic, the attendance of pupils is estimated to be 80.8% in 2022, which is still low. Are parents reluctant to send their kids to school due to safety worries perhaps? With around 8.5 million children attending schools every day in the UK, parents must be able to put their children's safety and security in the hands of the school's head teacher and staff. Children's safety and security When planning renovations or the construction of a new school, it's crucial to take the school fence, entrance gates, and access control into account. A perimeter should either stand out on its own or fit in with the surroundings while providing an acceptable and realistic level of physical security against any potential threats. When planning renovations or the construction of a new school, it's crucial to take the school fence For a special report titled ‘Protecting the Future,’ we commissioned research for which we polled 75 architects, 280 teachers (including around 50 heads), and 1,000 parents (a nationally representative sample) on numerous security-related themes. Our research shows that three out of ten teachers still believe that the school grounds are not secure enough. Design security solutions In 28% of schools, our research shows that criminal damage is a problem. Along with burglary, vandalism, arson, and anti-social behaviour, there are numerous other hazards. Criminals often target schools because they contain valuable resources. Other risks include excessive traffic or the chance that students will unintentionally use the fencing as a climbing frame. Any security plan for a school should start with a risk analysis. As every school site is different, facilities managers must design security solutions for schools on an individual basis. These findings prompted us to create our list of the top five factors to consider when evaluating the security of an educational site. Residential area risks: entrance points According to 56% of teachers, there are many entrances at their institution Access control is a crucial component of any school's security plan. According to 56% of teachers, there are many entrances at their institution. Access points should be strictly controlled, and there should be one central entry that is visible from the reception area or school office. Make sure to include a pedestrian gate near any car entry points for safety. If you do have extra gates, it is a good idea to only allow people to use them during peak hours. You may, for instance, designate a one-way path through the property. Make sure to post signage directing them to the main door and displaying the operating hours. The local surroundings It is essential to look closely at the surrounding environment in order to spot risks and potential problems. For instance, can fences, gates, and other barriers be successfully supported by the foundations? It is essential to look closely at the surrounding environment in order to spot risks and potential problems Are there any obstacles that should be avoided, such as hanging branches from trees on the boundary, storage containers or cars that can be used as climbing aids? Consider how security measures can influence the neighbourhood residents if your school is situated in a residential area. Acoustic fencing can provide security and seclusion in addition to reducing noise entering and leaving the school grounds. A softer look It can be challenging for any institution to strike the correct balance between allowing students and visitors in while also keeping out potential trespassers. Innovative colour use can soften the appearance of a perimeter and improve the school's image. Metal railings may be advantageous for some schools, but nurseries and primary schools may benefit more from timber fencing, which still offers security and protection but has a ‘friendlier’ aspect and greater seclusion. Designated pathways and times Sixth Form students are frequently allowed to leave the campus during lunch or free study periods At the busiest times of the day, many schools deal with considerable pedestrian and vehicular traffic. To maintain safety during these busy times, consider designing distinct designated pathways for cars and pedestrians, and spend time devising a plan for site security during off-peak hours. Are there any maintenance or delivery trucks entering the school grounds, for instance? While younger students may be picked up by parents at the halfway point of the school day in primary schools, Sixth Form students are frequently allowed to leave the campus during lunch or free study periods in secondary schools. Range of security options For schools with any level of risk, there are fencing and gates available in both wood and steel. Even if a slatted design is ideal, panels should be placed vertically to make them difficult to climb. The resistance of fences against climbing is increased by welded mesh designs with smaller gaps between the horizontal and vertical wires. A fence must have a minimum height of 1.8 metres overall and be able to maintain that height over irregular terrain without gaps. The resistance of fences against climbing is increased by welded mesh designs with smaller gaps Consider installing LPS 1175-certified fencing that is at least 1.8 metres high for schools that are in high-crime regions. The Loss Prevention Certification Board's (LPCB) security ratings, which are only awarded to products after extensive independent testing, demonstrate the resistance perimeter fencing systems may offer against several assault tools. Best learning environment Additionally, learning and health are significantly impacted by noise pollution. Only 30% of specifiers have used acoustic solutions for schools, making it a common oversight during the design process for schools. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends less than 35 dB of noise in classrooms for the best conditions for instruction and learning. But the EU estimates that more than 100 million people in Europe typically face noise levels above 55 dB. Acoustic barriers are one solution that can help create a quiet setting for the best learning environment, thus headteachers need to make acoustics a priority when consulting architects and specifiers. There are several choices, including earth bunds or berms, steel and aluminium barriers, and wooden acoustic barriers. Among security experts No matter how high the quality of the fence, if a tree or other item that may be climbed is nearby Although there isn't a single solution for all of the security issues that schools confront today, architects can help head teachers secure and welcome their children. No matter how high the quality of the fence, if a tree or other item that may be climbed is nearby, getting in becomes a simple process. Therefore, to examine any security measures that are being constructed or maintained at a school, specialists, architects, and contractors should all be invited to collaborate and advise school administrators. The significance of well-planned, protected, and designed schools for the safety of our children cannot be overstated. The design process requires careful consideration and adequate time. There is no doubt that enhanced communication and the sharing of specialised knowledge among security experts, designers, and teachers may dramatically increase the safety of our schools.

Protecting privacy: Tackling the oncoming wave of marketing data regulation
Protecting privacy: Tackling the oncoming wave of marketing data regulation

The nuances of data privacy continue to bombard organisations from all angles, and, amid the impending sunset of Universal Analytics (UA), it’s time to stop playing catch-up. Instead, by enacting future-proofing strategies around data as a first port of call, long-term compliance can be achieved as an automatic byproduct. Data privacy At data privacy’s ‘sunrise’, companies’ efforts were largely targeted towards the customer, ensuring that the ever-growing extent of information being handed over wittingly or otherwise was kept secure. Next came the juggling act of leveraging that information in the most responsible, yet personalised way possible. The tightrope of a more bespoke and smart service, without looking invasive or ‘creepy’, is one that many businesses still fall off. Regulation of privacy laws You only have to look to the UK, US, and India to see how regulations can evolve, or take time to reach Across both of these critical junctures, however, and underpinning every decision that an organisation makes in the data privacy space, is regulation. Four years ago, GDPR prototyped this more strict landscape, and several countries around the world have followed suit by ushering in their interpretations of data protection. But, as demonstrated by the upcoming depreciation of third-party data, compliance is never a rigid concept, nor set in stone. You only have to look to the UK, US, and India to see how regulations can evolve, or take time to reach even a temporary form. Future-proof, privacy-centric content strategy In some countries the implementation of these rules can vary from within, with different states updating their privacy laws according to their timescales, making it difficult to keep track of which regulations apply to what region. With this in mind, instead of waiting for each new direction in this evolving journey, marketing leaders should look further down the road with their next steps. By creating a future-proof, privacy-centric content strategy for their organisations now, they can both protect and delight customers, while remaining agile to future regulatory changes to come. Put the customer first Rewinding briefly to phase one of this data privacy conversation, the customer should still be at the forefront of their minds when visualising future regulatory adherence. After all, much of the changing legislation revolves around evolving consumer demands. The upshot is where marketing teams need to delve deeper to create a more individualised strategy Concerns around privacy have indeed grown in recent years, as reliance on digital means of service provision has become more commonplace. However, what has also grown in tandem, is the expectation for a more personalised experience. The often conflicting, the upshot is one where marketing teams need to delve deeper into personal information to create a more individualised strategy, without breaching their privacy or jeopardising data security. Self-accountability and compliance Compliance-wise, this is reflected in regulators giving companies just two weeks to turn around any recognised issues of non-compliance before shutting down their entire online presence. Self-accountability is part of the process, so it only makes sense to get that balancing act correct from the outset. If done successfully, not only will organisations be offsetting the need to reveal their shortfalls in such a way, but customer loyalty will be emboldened in the process. So, be transparent, be candid and be clear. Show customers how their data will be used, how it will be protected, and how such stringent regulatory requirements are being met. First-party data presents a first-class opportunity There is a slight, immediate glitch, to the above plan of action, however. The removal of third-party cookies is set to eliminate the head start organisations have been getting to this point, their secret gateway to try and optimise data, and win over customers through indirect means. The removal of third-party cookies is set to eliminate the head start organisations have been getting This naturally places all of the emphasis on the collation of first-party data instead, which is not necessarily a bad thing. If an organisation is already striving towards a sustainable future built on notions of transparency, relationship building, and mutual trust, then dealing directly with consumers can be a great opportunity to showcase that approach and philosophy. Data Enrichment Again, there is a tightrope to be walked in terms of not coming across as too invasive, as individual profiles and accounts are built. But, if handled delicately, and requested in exchange for incentives and rewards, then the payoff can be game-changing. Here, the key is ‘data enrichment’. By enacting strategies such as extended reality campaigns, or incentivised data sharing, companies can begin to form more complete pictures of individual users and collective demographics. Improved customer experience  That first-hand knowledge can then be converted into improved customer experiences more generally, and more bespoke offerings on a person-by-person basis. Data enrichment is so valuable as it largely offsets the risk of changing regulatory landscapes. By dealing with first-party data only, the perfect representation of the ideal customer is formed; and best of all, it is formed with those customers’ direct permission and input. A first step toward the future The benefits of meeting customer expectations, and enriching data, should be goals The benefits of meeting customer expectations, and enriching data, should be goals with or without regulatory pressures. It, therefore, makes no sense to wait for the exact dynamics of compliance to come to light before putting in place this future-proofing strategy. The legislation will indeed continue to change for different nations, regions, and sectors. Similarly, we’re likely to witness similar step changes to the imminent removal of third-party data in the future as well. Human-centric, responsible approach But compliance can be achieved ahead of time if the actions being taken are responsible, customer-centric, and most importantly, still place data privacy as a priority. Such an approach can get ahead of upcoming developments such as AI governance or data localisation because the core fundamentals will already be that perfect mix of lucrative and ethical. All companies need to do to get ahead of the curve is to maintain and demonstrate this human-centric, responsible approach to how data is gathered and used. It is a mindset and course of action that should be taken even without the threat of legislation. Ultimately, it is an opportunity to build stronger, more loyal relationships with customers, en route to a more valuable data-driven business proposition.

Latest Hirsch / IDENTIVE news

Identiv’s COVID-19 response solutions support enterprises and government customers in reopening of global offices
Identiv’s COVID-19 response solutions support enterprises and government customers in reopening of global offices

Identiv, Inc. has announced its cohesive collection of COVID-19 response solutions in order to support enterprises and government customers in worldwide offices that are now reopening. Identiv’s frictionless, touchless solutions create healthier and more hygienic offices. The hands-free technology also streamlines transactions and access, temperature tracking, and contact tracing to help employees and visitors feel safe and secure. Frictionless, hands-free technology “With the threat of COVID-19 still around us, frictionless, hands-free solutions are a key part of any organisation’s efforts to make a healthier, safer environment,” said Steven Humphreys, Identiv Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Identiv’s highly secure access and identity solutions address multiple business needs to re-open and grow" Steven adds, “Identiv’s highly secure access and identity solutions address multiple needs for businesses to re-open and grow again in the new pandemic-era normal.” Quick, affordable temperature tracking “As large public venues begin to reopen, quick, affordable temperature tracking will be the first line of defense to assure visitors and employees that operators have their safety at top of mind,” added Dr. Manfred Mueller, Identiv Chief Operations Officer (COO) and General Manager, Identity. Dr. Mueller adds, “For those not yet comfortable returning to work, secure network log-in options facilitate a bridge between on-site and telecommuting teams.” Identiv’s complete portfolio of COVID-19 response solutions include: Smart, frictionless access control MobilisID uses the latest in Bluetooth and capacitive technologies to allow complete frictionless access, no touching required. The MobilisID App (available via Apple iOS and Android) acts as a physical credential — the user can keep their mobile device in their pocket, wave their hand near the MobilisID Reader and the door automatically unlocks. MobilisID can also integrate with ADA-compliant automatic door hardware to form a complete touchless solution. With the Freedom access control system, no reader is even required at the door. Freedom’s software-defined architecture uses the location of a user’s mobile device to determine their proximity to a door for hands-free ingress and egress. The system can also be used in parallel with conventional reader doors. Frictionless, battery-less uTrust UHF Credentials work with identification applications that require long-distance reading (i.e., more than 18 - 21 feet). Ultra high-frequency (UHF) technology is ideal for parking lot access and gate control, door entry in hospitals or gated communities, logistics, object and people tracking in emergency situations, real-time locationing, cafeteria access, and any hands-free environment, including medical or care facilities, club and resort membership, sport facilities, and universities. The credentials can be read through badge holders, handbags, pockets, and  No-touch time and attendance uTrust 3721 F multi-technology smart card reader features multiple frequency options and a keyboard emulation. Perfect for employers who use a mixture of technologies for logical access, uTrust 3721 F leverages existing 125 kHz low-frequency (LF) or 13.56 MHz high-frequency (HF) cards. Out-of-the-box, uTrust 3721 F can work with most time and attendance systems, letting employees simply tap a card to the reader to clock in.  Nearly hands-free transactions and access With Near Field Communication (NFC) technology, it’s easy to get near an access point without ever actually touching it. Identiv’s NFC-enabled solutions feature a catalogue of transponders compatible with NFC Forum created for secure contactless transactions and connecting electronic devices with a simple tap-and-go model. Designed for comfort and wearability, the uTrust Proximity Wristband keeps wearers from reaching for their phone or card every time they need to gain access to a parking garage, building, room, or elevator. A passive radio frequency identification (RFID) device, the no-battery credential is robust, resistant to cracking, and impervious to moisture.  Temperature tracking and contact tracing Identiv’s Body Temperature Measurement Patch is a wearable NFC-enabled transponder that supports the reopening of public spaces worldwide, including theme parks and stadiums, and helps operators keep attendees and employees comfortable, confident, and safe. The patch also supports global governments and healthcare workers that need to periodically monitor quarantined patients diagnosed with COVID-19. The new solution combines the simplicity of using NFC and the smart technology potential of the Internet of Things (IoT), making body temperature monitoring easier than ever. Identiv has partnered with Telaeris to deliver a rapidly deployable, industry-renowned, mobile access control hardware and software solution that provides security in a variety of mission-critical situations where traditional systems cannot be supported. By leveraging Telaeris’ mobile credential verification hardware, Hirsch Velocity Software-based access control systems can go beyond protecting the perimeter and empower security staff to authenticate and authorise users with photos from anywhere, at any time, with real-time server synchronisation. Telaeris handheld units with HealthCheck functionality can prompt staff to ask a series of health questions and input the taken temperature of a validated user to create a ‘health/access check’ profile upon entering which can then be repeated upon exiting. If a person enters a building and is later found to be symptomatic, Hirsch Velocity Software with Contact Tracing can pull a report of everyone who entered the same door who can then be notified to either get tested or self-quarantine. While this is useful during the days of COVID-19, it can also be used for other applications, such as the seasonal influenza. This means every office can be proactive in responding to potential outbreaks, while simultaneously providing employees with the peace of mind that there are measures in place to keep them safe.  Working from Home For some organisations, even as worldwide economies are restarting, employees continue to or are more comfortable working from home. Identiv’s smart card reader portfolio keeps work flowing while ensuring everyone’s data and health stays safe and secure. Top selections for secure network log-in while telecommuting include, uTrust Token Pro Mini Type A (smallest form factor, strong PKI, and Java Card technology, uTrust Token Pro Mini Type C (USB C and can feature user branding and applets), uTrust 2700R Contact (supports all PC operating systems and cards ICs), 0 USB (ultra-compact, CAC and PIV-approved, and available in USB C, uTrust 4701 F Dual Interface (combines contact, contactless, and NFC tech), and uTrust SmartFold SCR3500 A (USB A, ultra-compact, and CAC and PIV-approved). As the economy begins to open up and people around the world return to work, it’s critical to have solutions in place that keep employees and visitors feeling safe, comfortable, and confident.

Identiv’s Hirsch Velocity access control platform now enables contact tracing for Hirsch customers
Identiv’s Hirsch Velocity access control platform now enables contact tracing for Hirsch customers

Identiv, Inc. announced the availability of Hirsch Velocity Software with Contact Tracing. Available via download for Hirsch customers, the free feature has been launched to support worldwide office re-openings with improved health and safety management tools. Based on the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions’ (CDC) recommendations, contract tracing is a key strategy for preventing further spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).  Hirsch Velocity Software with Contact Tracing is a means of proactively and reactively protecting visitors. If a person enters a building and is later found to be symptomatic of an illness, Velocity can pull a report of everyone who entered the same door who can then be notified to either get tested or self-quarantine. The feature is free, easy to download, and simple to implement into existing Velocity physical access control system (PACS) platforms.  Manage access control While this is useful during the days of COVID-19, it can also be used for other applications, such as seasonal influenza" “While this is useful during the days of COVID-19, it can also be used for other applications, such as seasonal influenza,” said Mark Allen, Identiv GM, Premises. “This means your office can be proactive in responding to potential outbreaks, while simultaneously providing your employees with the peace of mind that there are measures in place to keep them safe.” Hirsch Velocity Software provides the security and functionality expected from high-end systems with the ease-of-use found in entry-level packages. Velocity is an integrated platform that manages access control and security operations in thousands of different facilities, from single high secure rooms to multi-building, multi-location campuses with the most stringent security compliance. Prevent unwanted access With Velocity, users can control doors, gates, turnstiles, elevators, and other equipment, monitor employees and visitor behaviour, prevent unwanted access, maintain compliance, and provide a robust audit trail. The latest version of the software platform is designed to deliver the highest level of security, interoperability, and backwards compatibility, and it accommodates the evolution of security technology.

Identiv's Hirsch Velocity physical access control solution approved by the UK Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure
Identiv's Hirsch Velocity physical access control solution approved by the UK Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure

Identiv, Inc. has announced that after extensive testing of its Hirsch Physical Access Control System (PACS) CPNI solution, the platform is now approved by the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI), the UK government authority for protective security advice to the country’s national infrastructure. CPNI-approved physical access control platform The CPNI works with partners in government, police, industry, and academia to protect the nation from threats and terrorism, only recommending physical security equipment that meets its stringent certification requirements.  “UK sites classified as critical infrastructure, where deep encryption standards are paramount, can confidently deploy the Hirsch CPNI-approved physical access control platform,” said Mark Allen, Identiv General Manager, Premises Security Solutions. Hirsch Velocity Software Hirsch products, like our innovative Scramblepad readers, protect critical government and infrastructure facilities" Mark adds, “Hirsch products, like our innovative Scramblepad readers, protect critical government and infrastructure facilities across the UK, the U.S., and other governments around the world. Our CPNI-approved Hirsch Velocity Software security management system provides a highly scalable, end-to-end physical access control solution from the door to the server cluster, ideal for mission-critical environments. He further stated, “We are proud to continue to work with the UK government’s risk-critical sites to provide the most robust, reliable, highly secure yet cost-effective access control solution.” Hirsch PACS CPNI solution The Hirsch PACS CPNI solution encompasses Identiv’s highly secure product portfolio, including Hirsch Velocity Software, Hirsch Mx-8 Controllers, and Secure Network Interface Board 3 (SNIB3). Identiv’s suite of advanced access control solutions is approved for use in some of the world’s most security-sensitive organisations, including many UK government agencies. Hirsch Velocity Software’s security management system is an integrated platform that manages access control and security operations across thousands of disparate facilities, from single highly secure rooms to multi-building, multi-location campuses, with the most stringent security compliance. Hirsch Mx-8 Controllers Users can control doors, gates, turnstiles, elevators, and other equipment, monitor employees and visitors as they move around a facility, prevent unwanted access, maintain compliance, and provide a robust audit trail. Hirsch Mx-8 Controllers provide scalable, networked communication and are also available in two or four supervised door models. The modular design and scalable architecture enable an installation to start small and grow large, from a single controller system to a larger, multi-site enterprise. The Mx Controller is fully firmware, function, and communication protocol compatible with Hirsch systems so that existing credentials, readers, and databases can be retained. SNIB3 communication device SNIB3 is a renowned communication device that provides IPv6, Gigabit Ethernet, and AES 256 bit encryption SNIB3 is a renowned communication device that provides IPv6, Gigabit Ethernet, and AES 256 bit encryption. These features are already foundational for the critical U.S. FICAM security standard. For deployments already equipped with a Hirsch solution, SNIB3 is a drop-in replacement for Identiv’s SNIB2 and SNIB communications boards. Identiv Global Services Identiv Global Services (IGS) provides a comprehensive cybersecurity-hardening service to ensure the solution is deployed to the rigorous CPNI standard. This covers securing the operating system, database, and services, including all Identiv-supplied server components and networking equipment, as well as the Velocity client workstation. To protect against the rapidly evolving threat landscape, IGS through service-level agreement (SLA) supports the customer and the solution, updating security patches and applying the latest information assurance guidelines following UK standards and best practices.

Related white papers

The critical role of access control in K-12 school security

The benefits of Edge AI + Cloud for security systems

Unified physical security