Gallagher Command Centre v7.10
Gallagher Command Centre v7.10

Gallagher is proud to showcase Command Centre v7.10, following its launch earlier this year. Gallagher’s latest software release includes significant new features and builds on the capabilities of Command Centre Premier. In v7.10, cardholder and activity reporting is introduced in Command Centre Premier providing new levels of flexibility. Reports can be scheduled to generate automatically in response to an alarm and re-usable reports can be created in minutes using filters that are powerful yet simple to configure. The touch-screen Visitor Management Kiosk makes its debut and allows guests to self-register their visit, eliminating the need for front-line staff. The Kiosk is integrated with Command Centre and can be configured to accommodate a wide variety of requirements ensuring that you have maximum control over your site. The system will manage both arrival and departure processes, including the ability to access and update their visit details and issue their own visitor card or badge. On completion of sign-in, you can automatically be notified of a guest’s arrival via email or SMS. Additional new features include: Multi-server event aggregation - protects your business by enabling events to be sent to an alternate server where they can be used for global cardholder and site activity reporting. URL tile - permits operators to access information on the internet, intranet or LAN within the Command Centre Premier viewers. This allows a centralized view of external information to occur alongside key information controlled by Command Centre. Tag board tile - allows operators to actively monitor the cardholders within a zone in real-time on either local or remote site as they enter or leave an area. It has a number of potential safety applications; for example ensuring blast zones in a mine have been cleared before blasting.

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Access control software - Expert commentary

Artificial Intelligence (AI) in physical security systems: Trends and opportunities
Artificial Intelligence (AI) in physical security systems: Trends and opportunities

If you’ve been paying attention over the last twelve months, you will have noticed that deep learning techniques and artificial intelligence (AI) are making waves in the physical security market, with manufacturers eagerly adopting these buzzwords at the industry's biggest trade shows. With all the hype, security professionals are curious to know what these terms really mean, and how these technologies can boost real-world security system performance. The growing number of applications of deep learning technology and AI in physical security is a clear indication that these are more than a passing fad. This review of some of our most comprehensive articles on these topics shows that AI is an all-pervasive trend that the physical security industry will do well to embrace quickly. Here, we examine the opportunities that artificial intelligence presents for smart security applications, and look back at how some of the leading security companies are adapting to respond to rapidly-changing expectations: What is deep learning technology? Machine Learning involves collecting large amounts of data related to a problem, training a model using this data and employing this model to process new data. Recently, there have been huge advances in a branch of Machine Learning called Deep Learning. This describes a family of algorithms based on neural networks. These algorithms are able to learn efficiently from example, and subsequently apply this learning to new data. Here, Zvika Ashani explains how deep learning technology can boost video surveillance systems. Relationship between deep learning and artificial intelligence With deep learning, you can show a computer many different images and it will "learn" to distinguish the differences. This is the "training" phase. After the neural network learns about the data, it can then use "inference" to interpret new data based on what it has learned. For example, if it has seen enough cats before, the system will know when a new image is a cat. In effect, the system “learns” by looking at lots of data to achieve artificial intelligence (AI). Larry Anderson explores how new computer hardware - the Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) – is making artificial intelligence accessible to the security industry. Improving surveillance efficiency and accuracy with AI Larry Anderson explains how the latest technologies from Neurala and Motorola will enable the addition of AI to existing products, changing an existing solution from a passive sensor to a device that is “active in its thinking.” The technology is already being added to existing Motorola body-worn-cameras to enable police officers to more efficiently search for objects or persons of interest. In surveillance applications, AI could eliminate the need for humans to do repetitive or boring work, such as look at hours of video footage. Intelligent security systems overcome smart city surveillance challenges AI technology is expected to answer the pressing industry questions of how to use Big Data effectively and make a return on the investment in expensive storage, while maintaining (or even lowering) human capital costs. However, until recently, these expectations have been limited by factors such as a limited ability to learn, and high ongoing costs. Zvika Ashani examines how these challenges are being met and overcome, making artificial intelligence the standard in Smart City surveillance deployments. Combining AI and robotics to enhance security operations With the abilities afforded by AI, robots can navigate any designated area autonomously to keep an eye out for suspicious behaviour or alert first responders to those who may need aid. This also means that fewer law enforcement and/or security personnel will have be pulled from surrounding areas. While drones still require a human operator to chart their flight paths, the evolution of artificial intelligence (AI) is increasing the capabilities of these machines to work autonomously, says Steve Reinharz. Future of artificial intelligence in the security industry Contributors to SourceSecurity.com have been eager to embrace artificial intelligence and its ability to make video analytics more accurate and effective. Manufacturers predicted that deep learning technology could provide unprecedented insight into human behaviour, allowing video systems to more accurately monitor and predict crime. They also noted how cloud-based systems hold an advantage for deep learning video analytics. All in all, manufacturers are hoping that AI will provide scalable solutions across a range of vertical markets. 

Open platform security solutions: Managing customer expectations
Open platform security solutions: Managing customer expectations

It’s not hard to see why more and more locations are requesting security solutions that operate on an open system. Selecting products and platforms that utilise open standards—Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), HTTP, IEEE, RESTful APIs, etc.—provide additional levels of interoperability, scalability and versatility that give organisations the flexibility they want to be proactive with safety and security. Unfortunately, creating the right solution today isn’t quite as simple as reading a product sheet or specification. In the past, end users frequently were forced to pick hardware and software products that were proprietary to each individual manufacturer, meaning pieces of technology often didn’t have the ability to talk and interact with products that didn’t also carry its brand name. In the future, all systems likely will be open in some form and will provide a litany of connectivity options with little-to-no additional development time and resources. But until that day is here, it is important to manage the expectations for stakeholders involved with the project appropriately, knowing that the current security landscape has not yet evolved to the point that all systems are truly open. The current security space can resemble its past almost as much as its future Consumer technology expectations To be fair, the end user’s expectations are often set by what they see happening with consumer technology and not by what is currently available in the security marketplace. There, technological advancements can seem to happen overnight. The apps on your smartphone, for instance, perform almost instantaneous updates, even while you are not actively using it. As convenient as that may be with social media or gaming apps, this also can signal a system that regularly requires fixes and patches, a scenario that would not provide stakeholders with the advanced level of reliability that is demanded for adequate safety with commercial security products, in large part because it will expose locations to numerous liability issues. As a result, the current security space can resemble its past almost as much as its future. Decreased potential for compatibility Make no mistake, there are certainly many products available today that can easily integrate into open platforms, only in a more limited capacity. An IP desk phone, for example, could easily connect to another IP PBX system that can then place basic calls. But as the customer’s demand for additional sophisticated options increases—diagnostics, event triggers, location identification, etc.—the potential for compatibility decreases. When it comes to security, this is due to the fact that two products or systems rarely expose similar functionality using the same technology or language. Take this example, for instance: Manufacturer A sells a product that contains Features X and Y; Manufacturer B offers one with Y and Z. The customer therefore assumes - or may even be sold - a solution where X, Y and Z can all be configured. Pairing the two may give you interoperability with Feature Y fairly easily (if they are implemented the same way), but X and Z will not happen without an additional investment that may be difficult to procure. It benefits all parties to have a common understanding of the project from the very beginning Many manufacturers offer a list of ‘integration partners’ they are compatible with, but may not match the end user’s expectations Meeting end user expectations The devil, however, is in the details, a message that isn’t always effectively communicated to end users. Excusing it all off with the old idiom ‘It’s all Greek to me’ only sets up the project for potentially expensive revisions later on – costs that the integrator often has to eat. Therefore, it benefits all parties to have a common understanding of the project from the very beginning. Given the current state of the consumer marketplace, it is vital for integrators to understand the reality of the products they are considering before seeking out potential solutions. Many manufacturers offer a list of ‘integration partners’ they are compatible with, but these scenarios will carry a predefined scope that may not match the end user’s expectations. Assessing compatibility  To understand the full options available, a copy of a manufacturer’s Software Development Kit (SDK) needs to be requested, which should include detailed information about the possibilities for integrations with their products. A third-party development firm or contractor is fully capable of providing the same level of work as the manufacturer From there, you can compare the devices being considered to see how compatible they are with one another. Finally, it is important to consider the practical implications of financing. If the end user is seeking features that are not currently possible, then additional development will need to be contracted in order to make it happen. Some manufacturers offer design services with developers who are acclimated to their platforms that can help expedite the learning curve. However, with the right SDK and a background in the platforms being used, a third-party development firm or contractor is fully capable of providing the same level of work as the manufacturer. To understand the full options available, a copy of a manufacturer’s Software Development Kit (SDK) needs to be requested Considerations for security system integration To reiterate, any integration, no matter the scope, requires you to consider the following three questions: What does the end user want? What can the products do today? How can you bridge the gap?   It is imperative that both integrators and end users take the time to do the homework required with those three key questions to ensure they are selecting a solution that will not only work tomorrow, but also provides an appropriate layer of protection for people and assets today. Each party involved in an integration project needs to understand what exactly is available from a hardware and software standpoint This also should help mitigate any confusion or frustration that may be experienced by the customer. As much as we all would like to believe that each and every feature available is a viable option that simply isn’t feasible given the realities we face today. There will come a day when the technological advancements enjoyed by consumers around the world provide the type of experience that can be applied to security. Until that time arrives, though, each party involved in the project needs to understand what exactly is currently available from a hardware and software standpoint. The safety of everyone at that location depends on it.

How the convergence of physical security and cybersecurity will benefit businesses
How the convergence of physical security and cybersecurity will benefit businesses

The physical security industry is rapidly changing, ever evolving, and one that is growing faster than most other sectors of the greater global market. The latest research shows that the forecasted growth rates will be a compound average growth rate (CAGR) of 7.2% and a total market revenue opportunity of $41.27B through 2022. These economic indicators make the industry a very attractive investment for entrepreneurs and for investment from large corporations from other industries. At ISC West 2018, this was extremely evident as there was a palpable buzz from technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, cloud-based video management systems and cloud-based access control systems. New market entrants such as Amazon, and a seemingly increased interest and investment from the likes of Intel, IBM, and even Microsoft were present and contributed strongly to the buzz of the industry’s largest tradeshow.The global managed security services market is projected to reach nearly $40.97 Bn, with a CAGR of 16.6% over the next five years Need for education and enhanced security With the increased profile of the industry, one can clearly see that the physical security industry is expanding globally to new consumers; bringing with it an increased need to further secure products and services with comprehensive physical and cybersecurity protocols and the need for education. This convergence of physical security and cybersecurity will create new industry leaders that will emerge to lead a new segment of the combined market through strong investment and leadership. According to a report published from Allied Market Research (AMR), the global managed security services market is projected to reach nearly $40.97B, with a CAGR of 16.6% over the next five years. Correlating these two market data points, the forecast for the physical security market is expected to have nearly 18% of the total market opportunity comprised of cloud services at nearly $7B. Sharing security service best practices In September 2017 at the Cloud+ Conference in Austin, Texas, the leaders of the Access Control as a service (ACaaS) and Video Surveillance as a Service (VSaaS) markets, converged to share industry trends, observations of customer adoption, best practices in implementation and service, financial models, and several in-depth discussions on securing physical security of cloud implementations through cybersecurity. The physical security market will have nearly 18% of the total market opportunity comprised of cloud services These cybersecurity discussions absolutely dominated every discussion with the clear message that as a cloud service provider, manufacturers and integrators must continue to create robust and scalable cybersecurity offerings to protect customer data and facilities. Interestingly, an analysis of all of the past cyber breaches was presented by keynote speaker Dean Drako of Eagle Eye Networks, who, through a powerful visual diagram, noted that all existing breaches in the physical security industry were entirely on manufacturer provided hardware solutions; VMS physically installed on customer premises, and camera specific vulnerabilities across multiple providers.Network personnel, cybersecurity personnel, firewall experts, and cloud-specific software development staff all need to be added to core physical security engineering expertise Cloud versus non-cloud services The insight that one was able to glean from this information and, that of a greater analysis of cybersecurity hacks across all industries, was that manufacturers and providers of cloud services were more secure and reliable by orders of magnitude than non-cloud solutions. The reason for these phenomena also became glaringly evident; the security protocols of a cloud service provider is central to the business’s value proposition and as such should be addressed across all levels of manufacturing, implementation, and customer utilisation. Conversely, non-cloud deployed products rely on field implemented cyber strategies from integrators and end users which often expose lack of skills, education and budget to fully secure these physical security products. Ensuring successful deployment As a SaaS service provider, the technical personnel makeup results in an expansion of staff and expertise. Network personnel, cybersecurity personnel, firewall experts, and cloud-specific software development staff all need to be added to core physical security engineering expertise to ensure that the product developed can be successfully implemented and deployed.Implementing a process to protect millions of customer’s data records and facilities begins with mapping out a strategy to secure software and hardware. These new jobs in the physical security industry will astronomically expand as the market continues to grow $6 Bn in a little over 4 years providing new opportunities to existing and new personnel to enter the industry. As a leader in access control hardware and an ACaaS provider, ISONAS has taken it upon themselves to implement a process to ensure that their customers can easily implement their products and gain great peace of mind in regard to the security of the solutions. Data security strategies Implementing a process to protect millions of customer’s data records and facilities begins with mapping out a strategy to secure software and hardware. This means employing high-level, seasoned cloud deployment experts to create a strategy in our AWS infrastructure and all ancillary supporting technologies to minimise attack surfaces, create complex, proprietary associations in a multi-layered and multi-tiered connection throughout the application and lastly ensuring that all communication to and from customers’ devices are encrypted and secured. Implementing a process to protect customer’s data records and facilities begins with mapping out a strategy to secure software and hardware Once implemented ISONAS took it upon themselves to validate the infrastructure and the customers experience by subjecting the environments to 3rd party penetration tests. Addressing cyber threats These tests, taken up quarterly, ensure a customer that the latest in cyber threats are being addressed and that the manufacturer is providing the latest solutions available in the market.Integration implementation personnel should gain greater knowledge in networks and cybersecurity best practices for their solutions An added benefit is that customers gain the scalable benefits of enterprise corporate cybersecurity protocols at a fraction of the cost of implementing these on their individual premises. As an industry, however, it is not simply the responsibility of the cloud service provider to ensure that the customers data in video and access control are being protected. It is also incumbent on the integrator to ensure that the installation and implementation of the products and solutions are deployed in an educated and skill-based manner. Knowledge of networks and cybersecurity best practices The products and services utilised must be easy to implement, be clear in their requirements of the end user networks, and simplistic to apply. Nearly all manufacturers of these products are working diligently to ensure that the integrator has all of the tools at their fingertips to ensure a successful implementation. However, it will remain important that the integration implementation personnel gain a greater knowledge in networks and cybersecurity best practices for their solutions.The products and services utilised must be easy to implement, be clear in their requirements of the end user networks, and simplistic to apply In most cases, this will mean additional jobs for new higher-level personnel, access to additional services to provide to end users, and an elevation of networking and security expertise within their business. Expanding the reach of physical security These new-found skills and expertise will likely bleed into new markets and expand the reach of the traditional physical security market. It truly is an exciting time to be a part of a rapidly expanding market in the physical security space and to watch the industry react to the growing need for cybersecurity within products and services. In the next four years, there will be new innovations, new investments, and new winners and losers in products and services. It seems clear that those integrators and manufacturers who have begun to create the strategies and products for tomorrow will be well ahead of those who are not actively addressing the need for SaaS products, yet the window to opportunity remains wide open.

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